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  • reviews
  • 3
  • helpful votes
  • 5
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  • The Real Great Escape

  • By: Guy Walters
  • Narrated by: Richard Burnip
  • Length: 13 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 113
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 100
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 99

In early 1942 the Germans opened a top-security prisoner-of-war camp. Called Stalag Luft III, it soon contained some of the most inventive escapers ever known. They were led by Squadron Leader Roger Bushell who masterminded an attempt to smugglehundreds of POWs down a tunnel built under the noses of their guards. The escape would come to be immortalised in the famous film The Great Escape, but in this book Guy Walters takes a fresh look at this remarkable event and asks what was the true story?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • This Is The Great Escape

  • By Dinah on 24-12-13

A thoroughly researched re-telling.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 20-09-17

Any additional comments?

The story of 'The Great Escape' is well known and admired for its daring and spectacular attempt to disrupt the German forces on their home front. This book, however, asks some critical questions - not least of which is, should it have actually been attempted at all?

This incredibly well researched and detailed book looks at the central characters on both sides. Explains the similarities and differences between the commonly known accounts of the escape and the actual records pertaining to it and the individual experiences of the escapers themselves, before during and after the event.

It looks at the reasons why the 50 were shot and insights into the motivations of those who executed them.

I loved the famous all star film. I have seen documentaries and read previous accounts. Without doubt, this is a brilliant book, well balanced and a fitting story for the REAL Great Escape.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Haraken

  • A Silver Ships Novel, Book 4
  • By: S. H. Jucha
  • Narrated by: Grover Gardner
  • Length: 10 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 77
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 65
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 64

Nine years of tranquility came to an abrupt end when a Méridien starship entered the Hellébore system, sounding a dire warning for Alex Racine, the Haraken president. Unwanted visitors had arrived again. But this time, they're not alien; they're human. Claiming to have followed the course of a colony ship launched a millennium ago when Earth wrestled with resource wars and climate change, the mission commander, Antonio García, requests a meeting with the planet's leaders.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Awesome Series !!!

  • By Ostfeld on 13-09-18

Ripping Yarns in space (Episode 4)

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 28-06-17

Any additional comments?

The best yet! Gets my 5 Star rating.

The mystery of the Silver Ships is solved and the evil plan behind them is resolved ... for now. Alex and his band of refugees have found a home and a peaceful time ensues .... until a new enemy appears!

This episode of a highly enjoyable adventure series gets more faced paced, more inventive and contains elements of real jeopardy for our beloved characters. The villains of the piece are well drawn and it is clear that if our heroes are to win, and there is a very real sense that they may not .... then the price of any victory will be high .....

I loved this episode and I have now bought number 5 ....

  • Méridien

  • A Silver Ships Novel, Book 3
  • By: S. H. Jucha
  • Narrated by: Grover Gardner
  • Length: 14 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 85
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 74
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 73

The Méridiens are fleeing to their far colonies - and they have reason to run. Over the course of decades, they have lost hundreds of ships, billions of people, and seven Confederation colonies to an alien enemy: an advancing swarm of silver ships transported in the bowels of a gigantic, spherical vessel. Alex Racine, who once enjoyed the solitary life of an explorer-tug captain, is now an admiral and responsible for the lives of a quarter million Librans.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Beautifully done.

  • By Ostfeld on 22-08-18

More Yarn - bit less ripping - but that's fine!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 26-06-17

Any additional comments?

In this episode three, (non-spoiler review) the first quarter of the book is taken up with resolving the twist ending of episode two. Then we get into the meat of this part of the yarn .... exactly what is the nature of the inhabitants of the Silver Ships? Where are they from? Why are they here? What can be done about them? I can understand why some people think this section is a little long but as I am already deep into episode 4, I understand that episode 3 makes absolute sense!

The final quarter of episode 3 is a simple problem for our hero and his friends to solve ... They now have a quarter of a million refugee Librans, Meridians and New Terrans drifting through space in their small armada, just how do you start a new world? I am loving this adventure serial .... and if you trust me? Episode 4 gets ripping again!

  • Libre

  • A Silver Ships Novel
  • By: S. H. Jucha
  • Narrated by: Grover Gardner
  • Length: 10 hrs and 36 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 115
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 100
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 99

The surviving Méridiens have returned to Confederation space, aided by their recently discovered cousins, the New Terrans. They expect a celebration after their 71-year absence. Instead, they're shocked to find the silver ships have destroyed half the Confederation. The Méridiens are fleeing in advance of the horde of alien ships. But Alex Racine and his crew didn't come this far to run away from humanity's enemy.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Ripping Yarns in space (part deux)

  • By Del on 20-06-17

Ripping Yarns in space (part deux)

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 20-06-17

Any additional comments?

I loved this book as much as the first. Having just finished book 2 (and now purchased book 3) it is clear to me that this is not so much a book series as an adventure SERIAL. Each book is one complete episode of an extended story.This episode carries us to the next staging post for the Meridien survivors as they try to survive the invasion of the silver ships and our hero, Alex Racine, leads them with skill, judgement, commitment and, of course, good luck in the nick of time!I found the Meridien's salute to the fallen quite moving and my eyes misted over - soft, old fool that I am.There is more exploration of the developing relationship between the two species of humans and the added flavour of additional SADE's (Self Aware Digital Entities) as they collect more ships.A neat surprise at the end of episode 2 sets us up for episode 3 .... Holy space opera, Batman .... I am loving it !!!!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Silver Ships

  • The Silver Ships, Book 1
  • By: S.H. Jucha
  • Narrated by: Grover Gardner
  • Length: 10 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 186
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 171
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 171

An explorer tug captain, Alex Racine detects a damaged alien craft drifting into the system. Recognizing a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to make first contact, Alex pulls off a daring maneuver to latch on to the derelict. Alex discovers the ship was attacked by an unknown craft, the first of its kind ever encountered. The mysterious silver ship's attack was both instant and deadly.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Slow Start but got better - Worth a Listen

  • By stig1875 on 16-11-15

Ripping Yarns in deep space!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 14-06-17

Would you listen to The Silver Ships again? Why?

I loved this book. The themes it follows are familiar, there is nothing significantly original in the story but it does take some of those themes to interesting tangents. I have read several other reviews and some do complain that there is a great deal of 'not much going on', lots of polite talking - plenty of 'melo' but not much drama? Actually, these sequences are as fascinating for me as the action sequences.

What did you like best about this story?

Much of the story is taken up with two diverse cultures of human (ex - Earth) Colonists, who have been separated from each other for 700 years and some 23 light years distance who accidentally meet for the first time. They have developed into two very different societies..

The parts of the book that are described by some as 'polite talking' are some of the most interesting for me. The two races (the Meridians and the New Terrans) are trying to find common ground and to adapt to each other's ways in order to work together against a common threat. The way that this part of the story is written made it an entertaining, amusing and engaging aside from the main theme, which is that the Meridiens are an attacked but pacifist race who turn for help to the New Terrtans who are more in line with 'ourselves' (?) and more powerful physically and aggressive when faced with the threat.

A second plotline I loved involved the character,Julian who is a SADE (Self Aware Digital Entity - essentially a programme) who runs the Meridien ship. Again, this is not an original idea but this time it is nuanced by the way that the AI (who is deemed to be 'alive' in Meridien culture) having only been exposed to their thoughts, beliefs and behaviours throughout his existence is suddenly exposed to interaction with the main New Terran character, Alex Racine. Julian's AI adapts as a result of these interactions, his personality changes and this Digital Entity, more than any other character becomes an amalgam of both cultures (one might say the best of both cultures)..

The main storyline is familiar - an unknown, implacable and destructive alien race attacks a peaceful utopian society (the Meridiens). The invading aliens have something of 'The Kraken Wakes' about them so also not entirely original but around this rather exciting space adventure is wrapped a fascinating story of two peoples having to cross a gaping cultural divide to succeed.

The story of the alien invasion is not resolved by the end of the book, which leaves us with more to come in future instalments. I can't wait!

What does Grover Gardner bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you had only read the book?

I thought that Grover did a good job. His style is slightly robotic but given the storyline this actually felt the right style!

Did you have an emotional reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

I loved the humour in this book. The way the characters developed alongside each other made me care for them. Sure, 'the luckiest man alive' goes from awkward loner to beloved and brilliant leader too easily but it is fiction! It is a space opera and I unashamedly loved it enough not to care that our hero prevails in all circumstances with all virtues intact - and gets the girl - well, why not?

Any additional comments?

If you like a story that is dual paced with politics, relationships and emotional struggle set alongside your invasion space battles then you will love this book as much as I did. I gave it four stars rather than five simply because it is John Wayne in space not Tolstoy - but for what it wants to be - it succeeds for me. Bring on book two!!!