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Too far fetched for me!

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-03-18

This features a lawyer who has an IQ of 158. She can do nothing domestic at all. SHe finds herself agreeing to being a domestic servant. I can't suspend disbelief long enough not to get extrememly annoyed with the silly woman. I have enjoyed many of Sophie Kinsella's books but this is a waste of space!

2 people found this helpful

A meandering story about Fine Art

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-04-15

Would you recommend this book to a friend? Why or why not?

I wouldn't recommend this book unless my friend was really interested in art and art galleries. I felt that not a lot happened in the novel, characters were not developed well and the plot, when evident, jumped about a lot. I bought this book because it is by an Icelandic writer. Maybe I was expecting a different type of book.

What was your reaction to the ending? (No spoilers please!)

I felt the ending was a bit lame. The 'love interest' which was hardly there anyway just fizzled out.
I think this book is a 'rites of passage' for middle aged women. If so it definitely had the wrong ending.

Have you listened to any of Mary Robinette Kowal’s other performances? How does this one compare?

I haven't heard this reader before. She reads well and does numerous different voices with conviction. I guess she isn't British as she read a couple of words wrongly. I remember particularly the word 'plait' which she read as 'plate' which confused me somewhat for a minute. 'She wore her hair in a long blonde plate!'

Could you see The Perfect Landscape being made into a movie or a TV series? Who would the stars be?

I don't think this story is dramatic enough for TV or film. THere are too many locations and flashbacks too.

Well who did it?

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 21-02-15

If you could sum up Calling Out for You in three words, what would they be?

good tale unfinished

Would you recommend Calling Out for You to your friends? Why or why not?

Not really. The story was inconclusive. THe whole point of a crime story is to solve the crime but this didn't happen here.

Any additional comments?

I don't think the author told us who dunnit. Unless I missed a vital sentence (I listen while I'm machining) there was no proper conclusion to this story. THere were several threads not explained.

Wonderful wit

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 22-11-12

Twain is a master of throwaway lines, and there are so many here. It is read with intelligence and a very good insight into Twain's language.

The story is about travelling by stage from Missouri to Nevada through perilous deserts inhabited by native Americans and alsorts of bad and good guys. Twain's brilliant observation and ability to describe everything that happens to them with humour and consummate language skills is enhanced by Robin Field's excellent reading. Can't praise this book enough.

3 people found this helpful

Hard to 'put down'. Marvellous dialogue.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-07-12

I have really enjoyed this book. I have been transported back to Tudor times effortlessly. The characters are very well formed and the narrator successfully portrays this in his reading. Hilary Mantel is able to explain complex political situations so they are accessible to all through the voice of Thomas Cromwell. I think she must have a particular sympathy with Thomas Cromwell which enables the reader (listener) to empathise with him even when he is carrying out the most horrific shenanigans in the name of his king. The fact that he is living on a sword edge is never far from your mind.
That Hilary Mantel is able to create a fascinating story out of the real facts makes the recent 'Tudors' television show even less acceptable.

Roopa does it again

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-06-12

Roopa Farooki writes fantastic stories about mainly Indian subcontinent characters but with accessibility to everyone. THis story has so many twists as it follows the lives of several generations from Bengal to Tooting Broadway that it will keep you guessing until the last chapter.
THe author has a great ear for dialogue and understands family situations well.
THis is the third book of hers I have read/listened to and I look forward to the next one.

3 people found this helpful

Might be Described as a Romp

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-06-12

If you can suspend disbelief sufficiently to be able to get engulfed in the amazing occurences, you will enjoy this book. Its a bit of a mix of Agatha Christie, Enid BLyton and Janet Evanovitch! I found the tongue in cheek humour quite amusing but got a bit frustrated with the plot which involved people being very gullible about events and rather 'olde English' stiff upper lip refusing to report people to the police to protect them. For instance when the barmy vicar drives off in the main character's car she doesn't consider telling the police, although it is missing for several days and has a vital piece of evidence on the front seat, because it will go badly for the vicar if she tells. THe story depends on a lot of very strange unrealistic characters but kept me listening until the end.

A Brilliant Bodice Ripper!!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 21-06-11

Wonderful escapism.........just what I expected from Nora Roberts. A splendid story of a feisty independent woman warrior from another world; thrust into present day New York and the arms of a rather tasty PI. Of course the inevitable happens and they rid both their worlds of nasties while falling madly in love. Very convincing with a good twist in the understanding and misunderstandings of their worlds.
Would recommend this to anyone who wants to be entertained.

1 person found this helpful

A Suburban Death cover art

Stereotypical classist story

Overall
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 21-06-11

This was written in 2005 but fits better in the genre of the 1950's. The authors characterisation of working class (feckless and dishonest) and upper middle class (to be shielded and protected and can do no wrong) are shockingly stereotypical.
I found the main character (Daisy) irritating and not at all convincing. The plot depended on some very insecure suppositions and obscure relationships.

In all I did not have much sympathy for any of the characters and only listened to the end in case there may have been a twist which tried to switch my nonexistant sympathy towards the working class characters.

Peter Wickham did a valiant job, switching his accents skillfully but it didn't save the story for me.