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Moteridgerider

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  • Soul Wars

  • Warhammer Age of Sigmar, Book 1
  • By: Josh Reynolds
  • Narrated by: Andrew Wincott
  • Length: 16 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 106
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 100
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 99

It is said that all who live belong ultimately to the Undying King. In the shadowy lands of Shyish, Nagash, God of Death, calls forth his soulless legions to reassert his dominion. His dread advance begins with the free city of Glymmsforge, bastion of Azyr in the Realm of Death. Standing between Nagash and his prize are the brooding Anvils of the Heldenhammer, an ancient host of Stormcast Eternals, and Lord-Castellant Pharus Thaum, guardian of the Ten Thousand Tombs. As battles between the living and the dead rage throughout the Mortal Realms, the War of Heaven and Death begins anew.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • And now I feel invested in Age of Sigmar

  • By Jamie Lewis on 27-05-19

Immerses you in the lore of Soul Wars

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 20-04-19

Tomes from the Black Library are probably best enjoyed when you’re actually part of the world of Warhammer i.e. you’re a table top gamer. There’s something about taking part in the narrative play and painting the miniatures that brings you close to the characters and the world (or in this case realms) they live in. That’s not to say this book can’t be appreciated without playing Age of Sigmar, but it certainly helps. As to the story; well, I’d say it was pretty good. Some reviewers have commented that it seems to consist of many dramatic characters and demi-gods making grand, doom-filled speeches, and this is true. But if you’re Nagash, Lord of the Undead, used to whiling your time for centuries regenerating your body and inner energy, then what else have you got left to do? Andrew Wincott’s narration is superb in this respect, and his narration of the different Nighthaunt characters is immensely entertaining. Who knew there were so many ways to speak in the voices of the undead? In places the story is a bit repetitive. I lost count of the number of times that someone said ‘... all are one in Nagash’. There’s also no trace of romance or development of ‘relationships’ if you”re looking for those elements. This is probably the ethos of Warhammer, and aficionados won’t miss this, but it does tend to make you not care as much for the characters if you don’t think they have much to lose. It also doesn’t help knowing that you can always be reforged by Sigmar or recast by Nagash if you happen to fall by the Lord Executioner’s axe or mashed by a stormsmite maul. But overall I enjoyed this story and it will certainly colour my perceptions when launching my Nighthaunts in future battles!

  • Joyride

  • By: Jack Ketchum
  • Narrated by: David Stifel
  • Length: 6 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 2
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2

Carole and her lover thought they had committed the perfect crime, murdering Carole’s abusive husband and making it look like an accident. Unfortunately there was a witness, someone far more twisted than they are, with plans for a killing spree of his own.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Classic Ketchum doesn’t disappoint

  • By Moteridgerider on 08-12-18

Classic Ketchum doesn’t disappoint

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-12-18

A couple murder the ex-husband of the woman in the new relationship. The ‘victim’ had been an abusive husband in the extreme and continued to stalk and harass her long after the divorce. So, they attack him on a mountain and dispose of his body in a river. But their crime has been observed by Wayne - a psychotic time-bomb waiting for the right set of events to light his fuse. What he observes is the said trigger-point. He seeks out the couple and abducts them at gunpoint, taking them on a ‘joyride’ as witnesses to his brutal killing spree.
The plot is a fairly simple one, but Ketchum weaves his magic and gets us inside the heads of all the characters involved, including the tortured cop, Raoul who is tasked with chasing down Wayne before he can wreak havoc across two counties.
This book can’t top ‘Girl next door’ - that would be a feat hard to accomplish, but this is nonetheless a gripping tale and, if you like Ketchum, you won’t be disappointed.
There’s a fascinating footnote to the story where Ketchum details where his ideas for the story came about and how he amalgamated the mos of two real life killers to produce Wayne.
The narrator, David Stifel, does a superb job. His smouldering, brooding style lends itself well to the messed up characters in this story.
This is the third book of Ketchum’s I’ve read/listened to and I’m not going to stop until I’ve finished every one of them. There’s a reason this late author is revered so much. Listen and enjoy.

  • The Siren and the Spectre

  • Fiction Without Frontiers
  • By: Jonathan Janz
  • Narrated by: Davis Brooks
  • Length: 10 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 4
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 3
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 3

When David Caine, a celebrated skeptic of the supernatural, is invited by an old friend to spend a month in "the most haunted house in Virginia," he believes the case will be like any other. But the Alexander House is different. Built in the 1700s by a land baron to contain the madness and depravity of his eldest son, the house is plagued by shadows of the past and the lingering taint of bloodshed. David is haunted, as well. Twenty-two years ago, he turned away the woman he loved, and she took her life in sorrow. And David suspects she's followed him to the Alexander House. 

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Suspenseful haunted house tale well worth a check-

  • By Moteridgerider on 02-12-18

Suspenseful haunted house tale well worth a check-

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-12-18

Haunted House scenarios are making a return at the moment and Jonathan Janz’s take on the time-honoured classic has been received to high acclaim. In his tale, the dwelling in question is the ‘Alexander House,’ once owned by a disreputable son of a plantation owner called Judson Alexander. David Cain is a paranormal investigator of sorts, invited to stay in the House by the wife of his old friend, Chris. The wife, is a flaky believer in the supernatural legacy of the House. Like many similar tales there is a grisly history to the property including the murder and vivisection of a whole family. Cain is a sceptic, however, with a long catalogue of books published debunking all kinds of supernatural claims. He is soon to have his worldly views challenged by the Siren - a strange woman who sings a mournful song at night-time, luring Cain out on to the river close to the house. He witnesses her at a distance and she even impinges herself on Cain’s mishap in the river when his kayak is nearly washed away - together with himself.

The House is not without its own apparitions, however and it is quickly established that there are two main lines to the haunting - that of the Siren, and that of the Alexander family.

Just as disturbing, however, are the residents of the Shelby home. Cain is introduced to this sordid den early on by his encounter with a young boy. The family’s involvement in the history of Alexander’s reign of terror becomes apparent as the story unfolds. This aspect to the story introduced a Jack Ketchum-esque slant to things in that man’s inhumanity to man is often of greater dread than supernatural influences.

There are a number of themes that become apparent; the age-old conflict between scepticism/rationalism and the notion that the supernatural dimension might yet be real. There’s Cain’s personal haunting due to a past relationship with a girl from this area (who commits suicide,) coupled with the awkwardness of dealing with her still living sister. Finally, there is the inevitable striving to conquer one’s own personal demons and fears.
Throughout the novel, there is ample opportunity to ramp up the dread as several scenarios depict gruesome encounters and struggles with fiends both natural and supernatural. I felt that some of these conflicts were a bit overdone at times, especially in the last chapters. It was clear to me who was going to survive and who wasn’t, and a certain amount of predictable verbiage could have been trimmed to the benefit of pacing. Plot-wise, there were some interesting twists and turns, but Janz is having to compete, at least in my mind, with the recent spectacle of Netflix’s Haunting of Hill House which raised the bar in terms of character-driven, haunted house horror. Maybe it’s an unfair comparison but I’d just finished watching this after diving into Janz’s audio book.

My other main criticism is that there is perhaps too much plot packed onto the confines of one novel. There are two main strands to the storyline. That of Judson Alexander and his family, and Cain’s estranged girlfriend and her suicide. Bringing these two strands together produces a cumbersome end to the novel and again gave a sense of the story overstaying its welcome a bit.

The narrator, Davis Brooks, does a grand job. He has has an undramatic but pleasing storytelling voice. Nothing jarred in terms of his depiction of the characters, whether male or female, and his interpretation kept me awake during a long 300 mile trip across England - so, thumbs up there.

Verdict: A suspenseful, character driven novel that, despite a burgeoning content in places, was entertaining to listen to and made me want to check out more of Jonathan Janz’s work.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Hunger

  • By: Alma Katsu
  • Narrated by: Kirsten Potter
  • Length: 10 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 101
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 91
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 91

After having travelled west for weeks, the party of pioneers comes to a crossroads. It is time for their leader, George Donner, to make a choice. They face two diverging paths which lead to the same destination. One is well-documented, the other untested but rumoured to be shorter. Donner’s decision will shape the lives of everyone travelling with him. The searing heat of the desert gives way to biting winds and a bitter cold that freezes the cattle where they stand. 

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • History Merged With Supernatural Imaginings!

  • By Simon on 07-04-18

A disturbing horror tale living up to all the hype

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 29-09-18

The Hunger is described as a reimagining of the story of the ill-fated Donner Party expedition with a horror twist. If you want to see how closely it follows the historical narrative you can check out Alma’s blog here. But, in a nutshell, the story follows a real journey of a wagon party in 1846 as some ninety odd settlers as they made their way from Independence, Missouri to California. They became stranded in the snowbound passes of Sierra Nevada and purportedly resorted to cannibalism in their struggle to survive.
Accolades for the book include The Hunger making NPR's list of 100 Best Horror Stories and being named one of the 21 best horror novels written by a woman. It’s now being optioned for film production by Ridley Scott.
So, does the story live up to the hype? Well, if you know how I listen to my audiobooks from previous reviews, then you’ll know I tend to partake during the early hours of the morning. So the idea of listening to a horror book at these times adds some context to how scared I am while immersing myself in the tale.
Let me say straight away that Kirsten Potter’s narration is the perfect mix of storyteller and dramatist for this kind of tale. She has quite a breathy style, but to my mind this doesn’t detract from the listening at all and her separation of character’s voices works very well for both male and female. She succeeds in creating atmosphere in the scenes, particularly in evoking the ambiguous sense of dread that pervades this novel.
Despite a sense of being on the wide open plains of America, the ever impending doom over the party and the notion that they are being tracked creates a ‘closed-box’ feel to the story. There are numerous flashbacks which are skillfully written and I never lost sense of what was happening or when. These serve to set the characters in the mind of the reader, and I think it’s fair to say that the majority have dark secrets to hide and are in some way running from their past. The author manages to make the reader/listener identify with every one of them – even the most despicable. From a teenage girl haunted by the voices of the dead, to a lone man fleeing a misplaced guilty conscience, to the errant wife of the wagon train’s leader.
The setting is wondrously described and I had no problem imagining the baking heat of the mid-west plains to the freezing heights of the Sierra Nevada mountains. All are expertly described, together with harrowing scenes of bestial attacks, mass graves of the Hunger’s victims and depictions of the hardship endured at every step. You get the sense that none of the characters are safe, but I’ll not spoil it for you by saying how things end up. Suffice it to say that the book will leave you affected afterwards. I’d be surprised if it didn’t have you reaching for Wikipedia to see how much of the story was true.
The only niggle I have is that the UK cover for the book does not hold up to the scope and vividness of the UK cover (I’ve shown the latter here.)
So, my verdict? If you’re a horror fan you won’t be disappointed by this offering. Alma Katsu has departed a little from her usual territory with The Hunger and her next book is apparently a thriller drawing on her experience of working as an intelligence operative. But, I hope she’ll bring her pen back top horror in the near future.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Mongrels

  • By: Stephen Graham Jones
  • Narrated by: Chris Patton, Jonathan Yen
  • Length: 9 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 8
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 8

A spellbinding and surreal coming-of-age story about a young boy living on the fringe with his family - who are secretly werewolves - and struggling to survive in a contemporary America that shuns them. He was born an outsider, like the rest of his family. Poor yet resilient, he lives in the shadows with his aunt Libby and uncle Darren, folk who stubbornly make their way in a society that does not understand or want them. They are mongrels, mixed blood, neither this nor that.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • loved it<br />want more!

  • By Anonymous User on 25-10-18

A ‘different’ werewolf tale to get your teeth into

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 13-08-18

I’d wanted to read a book by Stephen Graham-Jones for a long time. Firstly, he was making waves with other horror writers and reviewers who I respect. Secondly, I’d listened to some of his videoblogs and become almost entranced by his mode of speaking, almost surreal and shamanic. Thirdly, I’d heard him read some of his stuff and the prose, together with that sense of strangeness had an immediate impact.
My gut feeling was that I wanted to read a paperback of his, but when I saw the audio version of ‘Mongrels’, the one that everyone was talking about, I opted for it.
The narration duties are shared between Chris Patton and Jonathan Yen, an unusual arrangement but one which the listener gets to understand when the structure of the book becomes clear. You see, Mongrels is about werewolves. For such a trope to remotely attract me it would have to possess a unique angle and fiercely engaging prose. Mr Jones doesn’t disappoint in this respect. The ‘take’ is that of a first person narrative for the longer chapters, almost diary-like, from the pov of a teenager being brought up by his uncle and aunt. These chapters are read by Chris Patton, who adopts an engaging but intense drawl to deliver the tale of a teenager coming to terms with his life-companions’ and relations’ nature. We understand from the get-go that his uncle and aunt are werewolves, forced into a vagrant lifestyle because ... well ... once you’ve hunted down and eaten a few prey then it tends to attract the attention of the law. We also learn that it attracts werewolf enthusiasts, other werewolves and ‘sheep.’ Sheep are an example of Mr Jones’ particular werewolf lore - werewolves who have forgotten or given good reason to leave behind their werewolf transition. These ‘types’ seem to be despised by our teenage werewolf’s uncle and aunt - for a reason that is only truly revealed at the end of the novel.
The shorter, interspersing chapters are read by Jonathan Yen. The timbre of his voice evokes that of an uncle telling folk tales as a bedtime story. The pov is that of third person and, at first, it seems that Jones is telling a different story until we realise that his mc is nothing but the teenage werewolf again, but portrayed as a character that a younger version of the teenage werewolf has adopted. So in one chapter we have the ‘vampire’, in another he’s a reporter. Yet another sees him taking on the role of a ‘criminal.’
In both these chapter-styles, the nature of werewolves is revealed, together with the conflicts encountered by the teenage werewolf as he tries to understand where he has come from and what he is to become. Part of him yearns to experience his first transition, while another part is fearful of what that will entail after being put through the trauma of witnessing acts carried out by his guardians. These are bizarre, visceral and awfully described by Jones. From the desecration of graves and consumption of corpses, to a mob-arranged fight between his aunt and another combatant, to a penultimate scene that sees the protagonist’s uncle captured and maltreated.
Mongrels is different to other werewolf stories because it is a coming of age tale, and sees werewolves in a less ‘gothic’ sense, more as entities proud of their heritage but trying to survive in a world where they are shunned by all.
Jones’ dispenses with some apparent ‘givens’. For example, werewolves are not affected by the moon at all; silver has more complex effects than simply killing a lycan in the form of a bullet. There are also some almost comical segments where our teenager is warned not to curl his fists during a change for fear his claws will pierce the hands. Or the ‘never wear lycra’ rule when the change is upon you - I’ll leave you to discover why this can be fatal to a werewolf. I must admit that, at times, it was hard for me to remember what these trope twists were and things got a bit complicated trying to understand the ‘rules’ behind werewolf physiology and behaviour. Maybe Jones tried too hard in this respect. The book is not linear but hops about in terms of timescale. This creates a ‘pastiche’ type of effect where mini-stories exist within the larger narrative. This works well and I didn’t lose track of which events happened in which order as we move toward the later stages of the teenager’s life and that burning question: will he go through the change or not? This is contingent on the relationship with his dead mother (killed at childbirth) and the nature of his unknown father. What adds to this mystery is that (as far as I can remember) we are never told the name of the mc.
From the narration perspective, I liked the voices of both storytellers as they provided an interesting and effective contrast to each other. Patton’s delivery, being intense, doesn’t lend itself to a bedtime story - believe me, this book will keep you awake for all sorts of reasons! So choose the time when you listen to it.
I shall certainly be reading and listening to more from Stephen Graham Jones. He has Native American roots and this sense of having an ostracised and misunderstood culture, yet one you are fiercely proud of, comes through in the story. I sense that his themes will have broader contexts, but suffice it to say, his tales (at least this one) are much deeper than the shock-gory-slasher expectations of your standard horror novel. They provide more satisfying meat.

  • My Absolute Darling

  • By: Gabriel Tallent
  • Narrated by: Alex McKenna
  • Length: 15 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 383
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 356
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 360

At 14, Turtle Alveston knows the use of every gun on her wall; that chaos is coming and only the strong will survive it; that her daddy loves her more than anything else in this world. And he'll do whatever it takes to keep her with him. She doesn't know why she feels so different from the other girls at school; why the line between love and pain can be so hard to see; why making a friend may be the bravest and most terrifying thing she has ever done; and what her daddy will do when he finds out....

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • So grim

  • By Mrs. Caroline Bradshaw on 11-01-18

Will enthrall and appall you in equal measure

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 18-01-18

Where does My Absolute Darling rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

Top 3

What was one of the most memorable moments of My Absolute Darling?

See below

What about Alex McKenna’s performance did you like?

At first, I wasn’t sure I was going to like Alex McKenna's voice. It has a husky quality which made me think she needed to clear her throat, but it gradually grew on me. Being an audio-narrator myself I can only marvel at McKenna’s phrasing and characterisation. From the menace of Martin’s domineering personality, to the hippyish banter of Jacob and Brett, McKenna fleshes out the characters with effortless skill

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

See below

Any additional comments?

I tend to listen to audiobooks in the early hours of the morning when suffering from insomnia. The notion is that reading a book is likely to wake me up too much and that just lying there counting sheep is counterproductive in terms of wrestling with endlessly cycling thoughts and emotions. Audiobooks, in theory, provide a happy medium between the two; hopefully tapping into the childhood ‘bedtime story’ vibe.

With this in mind, Gabriel Tallent’s book in hindsight, was not the best book to choose for this purpose. It is not an ‘easy’ listen. In the same way that Jack Ketchum’s ‘Girl next door’ was not an easy read. It’s a story that grips you, attaches you to the complex characters and pummels your emotions like a butter churner. Definitely not sleep-inducing stuff!

Turtle Alveston is a young teenage girl and protagonist in this story. She has several names. Her real one is Julia, but her Dad, Martin, calls her ‘Kibble’ (don’t know if I’ve spelled that right – it was an audiobook after all.) At first it’s quite difficult to tell what exactly this young girl’s character is or where the story is going. In fact the first chapter or two are very intriguing for this reason. But one thing the reader/listener is left in doubt about, is that Turtle has an extraordinary upbringing and that things are not quite … normal. She meticulously maintains and expertly uses firearms. She eats raw eggs for breakfast. Her morning routine includes uncapping a bottle of beer for her obsessive and controlling father. She knows how to look after herself in the wild.

Turtle has no friends at school but is not bullied. There’s something so edgy about her that other kids keep a respectful distance. In fact, it isn’t until one of her forays into the wilderness turns into a several day absence from home that she forges a relationship of sorts with two, lost teenage hikers.

As a listener, I remained immersed in the story while I figured out my bearings as a result of Tallent’s uncanny … ahem … talent for description and internal dialogue on the part of Turtle. I’ve watched one interview with the author on youtube and he reveals that he purposefully set out to depict Turtle’s character as a ‘glimmer’ that became fully formed after he repeated draft after draft. As such, he has been able to get into the essence of this complex, young, female character and that is a great accomplishment as a male author. Turtle is the ultimate unreliable narrator as she seeks to make sense of and justify her predicament, often mimicking speech and thought patterns of her father.

Tallent interweaves the scenes and settings of North California with consummate skill. As a biologist, I was enthralled at his descriptions of the plant-life in the story. Something that is not incidental. Turtle’s exploration of the local flora is interwoven with some heavy emotional themes that come to the fore in conversations with her grandfather and her struggles with a garden at the end of the book.

It’s hard to chart the emotional roller-coaster that this book takes you on without giving spoilers, so all I can say is that just when you feel you are able to take a breather from the wrenching you have gone through in one scene – bam! Tallent hits you with another. The depictions of violence, cruelty and abuse pull no punches. But these are not prurient or facile attempts to shock. In Tallent’s own words they are an honest effort to treat the subject matter in a manner that has integrity and reality. The book is stronger for it. For me, the most excruciating moments are Martin’s coercive and insidious justifications for his actions and the way he tries to place the responsibility for what happens on Turtle. Like I said – not sleep-inducing fare.

Another drawing point for me were the observations that characters make about the natural world in the story and how they are an allegory for momentous issues in those character’s lives. Particularly poignant are the scenes where Turtles grandfather talks to her about the naming of plants and how sometimes things don’t need an immediate name, just the will to describe them. Another, is when Turtle deals with a black widow spider on behalf of a young girl, Cayenne (spelling may be wrong – it’s an audiobook.)

Stephen King has placed this book on a pedestal with ‘Catch 22’ and ‘To Kill a Mockingbird.’‘My Absolute Darling’ will both entice and appall you in equal measure. Don’t listen if you have a heart condition.

24 of 26 people found this review helpful

  • The Devil's Detective

  • Thomas Fool, Book 1
  • By: Simon Kurt Unsworth
  • Narrated by: David Rintoul
  • Length: 11 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 503
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 476
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 475

Welcome to hell...where skinless demons patrol the lakes, and the waves of limbo wash against the outer walls while the souls of the damned float on their surface, waiting to be collected. When an unidentified, brutalised body is discovered, the case is assigned to Thomas Fool, one of hell's detectives, known as Information Men. But how do you investigate a murder where death is commonplace, and everyone is guilty of something?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Fantastic Horror!

  • By Lynn Worton on 15-10-15

A masterpiece that rewards patience

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 24-09-16

Where does The Devil's Detective rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

It's the first I've completed, but it's been a great start to audiobook listening.

What was one of the most memorable moments of The Devil's Detective?

Scenes with The Man of Plants and Flowers.

What does David Rintoul bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you had only read the book?

Great dramatic delivery.

Did you have an emotional reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

It filled me with dread and morbid fascination - like any good horror/thriller should.

Any additional comments?

For me, this wasn't an easy book to pick up momentum with. Perhaps it was because Unsworth's vision of hell is far removed from the conventional judaeo-christian expectation. Apart from the demons, the whole landscape and parameters are alien and devoid of the usual reference points. But such is the genius of the story. This is a hell where people can still die, where suffering occurs, not by the standard 'fire and brimstone', but by a myriad of tortures designed to allow the damned a glimpse of hope, only to have it dashed utterly. Into this landscape enters the protagonist, Thomas Fool; an information man employed by 'The bureaucracy' (if ever there was a hellish concept then this is the nadir.) His job? To investigate a series of grisly murders so savage that the perpetrator rips the very soul from hapless victims. The strength of Unsworth's writing is in the descriptions of hell and its inhabitants. Scenes from the Orphanage and Crow Heights will inhabit my nightmares for many years to come. Such visions are the literary equivalent of painters such as Wayne Barlowe and Zidislaw Beksinski. What seem to be unrelated scenes at first build toward a story climax that is terrifying and cataclysmic.
And so to the narration. David Rintoul has an impressive acting and narrating pedigree, and is the perfect vehicle for Unsworth's depictions and characters. The drama in his delivery lifts this story to even greater heights and I loved his interpretation of characters such as Elderflower, Rakshassas, the demon and The Man of Plants and Flowers - I know, you see how imaginative Unsworth is? As an audio narrator myself, I've marvelled at Rintoul's expression and learned a thing or two as well. With a sequel on its way I'm hoping that author and narrator will be reunited for the audio version.

10 of 11 people found this review helpful