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Kallie Harris

  • 13
  • reviews
  • 9
  • helpful votes
  • 13
  • ratings
  • A Discovery of Witches

  • The All Souls Trilogy, Book 1
  • By: Deborah Harkness
  • Narrated by: Jennifer Ikeda
  • Length: 23 hrs and 59 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,829
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,305
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,307

It begins with absence and desire. It begins with blood and fear. It begins with a discovery of witches. Diana Bishop, a young scholar and descendant of witches, discovers a long-lost and enchanted alchemical manuscript deep in Oxford's Bodleian Library. Its reappearance summons a fantastical underworld, which she must navigate with a vampire, Matthew Clairmont. This manuscript, Ashmole 782, holds the secrets of their past...and the key to their future. 

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A surprisingly mature paranormal romance

  • By Caroline Marks on 01-03-11

Huh.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-12-18

I came to this via the series recently shown on Sky as it caught my interest enough to want to actually get around to reading the books that have been sitting on my bookshelf for years. I wasn't disappointed per se but I wasn't exactly blown away either. I moved back and forth between audio and hardcopy so it was more immediate to me that I would have made different choices on inflection and narration than the narrator but that's why I like audio books, they take me out of my comfort zone. The narrator here is excellent - although, again, if you can't do regional accents then please DON'T - and she did the best she could with what she had. The story is good but would have benefited from some heavy editing and, yep, Twilight for grown-ups fits pretty well. I like the historical detail and descriptions of the settings but it could be mostly trimmed by about thirty percent and you wouldn't have lost much. The author tumbles headlong into the trope of using 'the vampire' or 'my vampire' as descriptive terms where 'he' or 'him' would have worked just as well. In mainstream fiction do we have protagonists constantly referred to as 'the man' or 'my human'? Once you have established a character's species and the associations and habits of that particular species then assume your reader has enough intelligence to remember them from sentence to sentence and stop hammering them home. I didn't particularly engage with the primary two characters but the secondary cast definitely had me coming back for more. I also found it jarring that once the author set world rules she almost immediately forgot them if they conflicted with where she was taking the story or undermined her characters' power. Also the ridiculous adding on of every single witch power ever heard of in existence to Diana and the increasingly sentient house just got silly towards the end. This is a suitable foundation for the next book in the series (which I've started and already seems much stronger in every way) but if you're expecting standards of Gabaldon then you will be disappointed. I want to see where it goes and get some more backstory on several characters so I'm going to stick with it and I'm sure the excellent narration is going to contribute to my enjoyment very much.

  • Sin and Tonic

  • Sinners Series, Book 6
  • By: Rhys Ford
  • Narrated by: Tristan James
  • Length: 10 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 9
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 9
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9

Miki St. John's best friend, Damien, is back from the dead, and their new band, Crossroads Gin, is soaring up the charts. Miki’s got a solid, loving partner named Kane Morgan - an inspector with the SFPD whose enormous Irish family has embraced him as one of their own - and his dog, Dude, at his side. It’s a pity someone’s trying to kill him.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Please stop trying to do accents. Please.

  • By Kallie Harris on 14-11-18

Please stop trying to do accents. Please.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 14-11-18

Rhys Ford is one of my favourite authors and I have been following this series all along - with some minor quibbles - and I was looking forward to the wind up. The narrator gave it his all, as always, and is reliable and enjoyable when telling the story but is appalling when trying to deviate to a new accent. He tries to differentiate between so many characters with so many different accents that he manages to mix them up more than once (or ten times) and completely butchers them when he’s just doing a two person scene. It’s not jarring enough to take you out of the story, just mildly annoying if you let it register too much. What IS annoying is the constant need everyone in the story has to reassure Miki and tell him what a precious little treasure he is and how much he’s cherished and adored. A good third of this book could have been edited out thanks to this constant repetition of the theme. It kind of read like a bad hurt/comfort fanfic at times. The author has a wonderful way with words and descriptive narrative but, again, I don’t know what the editor was thinking. This could have been tightened up so much and the story would have been kept on track and flowed much better without half the flowery fluff that chokes almost every scene. The central plot is fascinating and as a long time follower of the series answers so many questions that you didn’t even know you wanted answers to and I loved that. I was a bit miffed that one really important character was introduced and got very little ‘screen time’ or development in favour of focusing on Miki’s relationship with another major character (and, again, we get it. He’s very special. Show don’t tell and *definitely* not every damn scene.) and I would have really liked to see that particular character and the tie he has to Miki developed more. I found it a bit of a struggle to get through the story but I made it because I had already invested so much in the characters I knew. It’s not one of the author’s best but it’s worth a credit. I gave the story four stars overall partly because of loyalty but mainly because it is a good performance and story and wraps up all loose threads from the stories that precede it.

  • Heirs of Grace

  • By: Tim Pratt
  • Narrated by: Leslie Hull
  • Length: 9 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 37
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 33
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 33

Recent art school graduate Bekah thought she’d hit the jackpot: an unknown relative died, and she inherited a small fortune and a huge house in the mountains of North Carolina. Trey Howard, the lawyer who handled the estate, is a handsome man in his 20s and they hit it off right away - and soon become more than friends. Bekah expected a pleasant year to get her head together and have a romantic fling. Problem is, the house is full of junk...and siblings she didn’t know she had are willing to kill her for it.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Good supernatural storyline

  • By Fallon-Stacey on 13-06-18

Felt like it should have been bigger

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 18-06-18

I really enjoyed the first half or so of this book. The main character was very likeable and determinedly pragmatic and her sidekick/love interest much the same but with all the interesting back story and secondary characters I was expecting a much more intense and finely tuned climax. It was entertaining and had so much more potential than the very blah ending we ended up with. It would have been fine for the first book in a series or as the first part of a much longer novel but as it stands it was surprisingly unsatisfying in the end. I also think a major plot point that would have added another layer to the back story and the character’s history was completely overlooked and was surprised that Becca didn’t voice her curiosity on the maternal half of her parentage more or *at all*. The narration was excellent and I really enjoyed the performance. Overall a nice way to spend a few hours but expect to come away with a simmering frustration if you expect something more than a ‘and then they all lived happily ever after’ when you’ve invested a good slice of time in such a promising and interesting beginning.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Digging Up Mother

  • A Love Story
  • By: Johnny Depp - foreword, Doug Stanhope
  • Narrated by: Doug Stanhope and Friends
  • Length: 12 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,066
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 996
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 991

Doug Stanhope is one of the most critically acclaimed and stridently unrepentant comedians of his generation. What will surprise some is that he owes so much of his dark and sometimes uncomfortably honest sense of humor to his mother, Bonnie.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Worthwhile Listen

  • By Kathleen on 21-09-16

If I was his mother I'd have killed myself too....

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 22-09-17

What would have made Digging Up Mother better?

Literally anything. Other narrators. Other writers. Someone breaking it to this man that he's nowhere near as hilarious as he thinks he is.

What was most disappointing about Doug Stanhope and Johnny Depp - foreword ’s story?

The grating, self-indulgent, arrogant manner of the author and his ear blistering narration.

How did the narrator detract from the book?

As the book seemed pretty dreadful anyway I don't think I can say that he in any way detracted from the book, just confirmed it's overwhelming awfulness.

If you could play editor, what scene or scenes would you have cut from Digging Up Mother?

All of them.

Any additional comments?

In all seriousness this book really is terrible. The 'cast' of additional narrators do nothing to add or detract from the author/main narrator who comes across as wholly unsympathetic and unpleasant, even when he's trying to demonstrate he's now evolved as a human being and learned from his and his parents' life experiences. Don't waste your money or credit. I've returned it after sticking it out for five chapters as I think chapter 6 would have caused actual hemorraging from my ears.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • How to Be a Normal Person

  • By: TJ Klune
  • Narrated by: Derrick McClain
  • Length: 11 hrs and 7 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 84
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 78
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 79

Gustavo Tiberius is not normal. He knows this. Everyone in his small town of Abby, Oregon, knows this. He reads encyclopedias every night before bed. He has a pet ferret called Harry S. Truman. He owns a video rental store that no one goes to. His closest friends are a lady named Lottie with drag queen hair and a trio of elderly Vespa riders known as the We Three Queens.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Wonderful

  • By Kallie Harris on 10-03-17

Wonderful

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-03-17

I've got a fair few of TJ Klune's books on Audible and I do enjoy them immensely but this is the first book I've listened to with this narrator and it's taken it into a new level of enjoyment. This is simply beautifully performed and I know that as soon as I've finished (one chapter left!) I'm going to go straight back to the beginning and start it again. The characters are so easy to like, the love story unusual and compelling and the narrator does an equally wonderful job of comedy and pathos. Yes it's long (it seems to be TJ Klune's trademark) but this is the first book of the author's that I haven't got a little bit impatient with as the story played out and I put that down to this brilliant narrator. I'll definitely be seeking out more of his work and can throughly recommend this as one of TJ Klune's most outstanding works.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • The Lightning-Struck Heart

  • By: TJ Klune
  • Narrated by: Michael Lesley
  • Length: 19 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 204
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 190
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 189

Once upon a time, in an alleyway in the slums of the City of Lockes, a young and somewhat lonely boy named Sam Haversford turns a group of teenage douchebags into stone completely by accident. Of course, this catches the attention of a higher power, and Sam's pulled from the only world he knows to become an apprentice to the king's wizard, Morgan of Shadows.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Utterly hilarious

  • By Sarah Louise Smits on 18-01-16

Good use of a credit

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-03-17

Would you consider the audio edition of The Lightning-Struck Heart to be better than the print version?

I have got both and they both bring different qualities. I know reading the print version and aborbing the author's text descriptions of tone and inflections I would have expected different choices to be made by the narrator as his choices sometimes completely changed a scene or description for me from my original perception but I still really liked both versions.

What was one of the most memorable moments of The Lightning-Struck Heart?

The moments for me that stood out were not the comedy (sometimes overly heavy handed) but the emotional scenes, either lone character realisations or connections between two or more of them.

Which scene did you most enjoy?

Ryan, Tiggy and Gary rescuing Sam and Justin from their captor.

If you made a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

See it to believe it....

Any additional comments?

I really, really enjoyed this book. It's overly long and hideously self-indulgent but so light and frothy and sparkly and downright enjoyable that you just don't care. I'm a big fan of both the writer and the narrator so basically had a really good time. Some of the accent choices are downright weird - and horribly off, HORRIBLY - but the whole production is slick, entertaining and the narrator is very, very easy to get swept away with and take you away as he obviously enjoys every single second of what he's reading. I would LOVE the writer to get a strong editor that would help him streamline his works to something a little less cumbersome and unwiedly as I would say at least two-three hours of this book is completely redundant but it doesn't detract from your enjoyment at all and I can't recommend this enough. Spend the credit, you won't regret it!

  • Murder and Mayhem

  • By: Rhys Ford
  • Narrated by: Greg Tremblay
  • Length: 7 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 53
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 52
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 52

Former cat burglar Rook Stevens stole many a priceless thing in the past, but he's never been accused of taking a life - until now. It was one thing to find a former associate inside Potter's Field, his pop culture memorabilia shop, but quite another to stumble across her dead body.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • You won't regret it

  • By Kallie Harris on 07-09-15

You won't regret it

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-09-15

Where does Murder and Mayhem rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

This is one of my favourites by far. I'm a fan of Rhys Ford, although I've always had issues with one or more characters she's produced being a bit O.T.T. in their execution, but on this latest offering she's hit her stride and every single character is pitch perfect. The effort that's gone into every aspect of this book just shines from every page (well, I've 'read' the audio version but you know what I mean!) and this is not only one of my favourite audiobooks but my favourite Rhys Ford book to date as well. I can't wait to read/listen to Alex's story and catch up with Rook and Dante and Archie too! I can't say whether I'd have had such a strong connection to the book if I'd read it as a print offering but I do know Greg Tremblay's performance was absolutely outstanding here and I can't recommend it enough.

What did you like best about this story?

The characters, the thought that has gone into every aspect of the story, the often hilarious dialogue and the slow (even though it only happened over a couple of days!) build between the characters. I could actually believe their relationship - which is unusual to say the least in this or similar genres - and could understand why it progressed as it did.

What about Greg Tremblay’s performance did you like?

Absolutely everything - I've got a couple of his performances for Rhys Ford already and, although good, I didn't experience the breadth of his talent and pacing until this book. Much like Ms. Ford he appears to have hit his stride with this book and absolutely everything is perfect from the accents to the pacing.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Without a doubt, sadly I couldn't but I would have loved to have done.

Any additional comments?

If there is one book that you choose to have as a first experience for either author or narrator then make it this one, you won't be disappointed. Excellent and incredibly enjoyable experience. Can't wait for the sequel, I'll be devastated if there isn't!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Boy with the Painful Tattoo

  • Holmes & Moriarity, Book 3
  • By: Josh Lanyon
  • Narrated by: Kevin R. Free
  • Length: 7 hrs and 36 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 43
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 40
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 40

It's moving day at Chez Holmes. Somehow, against Kit's better instincts, he and J.X. are setting up house together. But while J.X. is off at a writing conference, Kit unpacks a crate that should contain either old books or new china. It doesn't. Within the mounds of Styrofoam popcorn is a dead body. A very dead body. There goes the neighborhood.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent!

  • By Kallie Harris on 08-03-15

Excellent!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-03-15

What did you like most about The Boy with the Painful Tattoo?

Revisiting old friends, the sublime story, the outstanding narration

What was one of the most memorable moments of The Boy with the Painful Tattoo?

The chase in the car park - eek!

What about Kevin R. Free’s performance did you like?

He delivers exceptional performances every time and you know that it will always be of the highest quality. Every tone and emotional inflection is right and he maintains a consistent and pitch perfect manner from beginning to end.

If you made a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

Just When You Thought It Was Safe...

Any additional comments?

Josh Lanyon is, as always, fantastic as an author. He transcends his genre every time and you forget that you're listening to 'gay' fiction and you can just revel in the superior storytelling and characterisation. I've got a lot of his books in audio and I've never been disappointed - I can absolutely recommend anything he's ever created. The narrator here is absolutely brilliant - he drives everything along perfectly and had me glued throughout. So, so much fun and you won't regret the credit spent!

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Dirty Kiss, Book 1

  • By: Rhys Ford
  • Narrated by: Greg Tremblay
  • Length: 8 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 71
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 68
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 67

Cole Kenjiro McGinnis, ex-cop and PI, is trying to get over the shooting death of his lover when a supposedly routine investigation lands in his lap. Investigating the apparent suicide of a prominent Korean businessman's son proves to be anything but ordinary, especially when it introduces Cole to the dead man's handsome cousin, Kim Jae-Min.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Dirty Kiss (っ˘з(˘⌣˘ )

  • By CrBubble on 26-04-14

Entertaining

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-03-15

Where does Dirty Kiss, Book 1 rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

The author is a favourite of mine and I'm always confident of a good, well written story so reasonably highly but the choice of narrator definitely impacted my enjoyment of the story.

What did you like best about this story?

The thought and care given to the characters and their backstories. The surrounding cast and the narrative drive throughout taking you to the big reveal.

What three words best describe Greg Tremblay’s performance?

Stilted, jerky, uncomfortable.

If you made a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

Two Worlds Collide...

Any additional comments?

I did enjoy this book very much (I've mostly come to this author via the audio medium) but I had to work at it because of the narrator. I couldn't work out if he was actually pausing for punctuation in the written text or if his performance style was actually so awkward. It definitely wasn't as smooth a listen as some of the performers I've listened to - the narrator delivers his performance in short, staccato bursts that definitely wear on you after a while. This is the first book by the author that I've had to take a break from and come back to rather than resentfully stopping it to concentrate on other things. The story itself is good - well written, the characters intresting and engaging and the dialogue snappy. The book is well worth a credit and I'm following the series but I probably won't follow the narrator outside of the Rhys Ford's work.

  • Fish and Ghosts

  • Hellsinger, Book 1
  • By: Rhys Ford
  • Narrated by: Tristan James
  • Length: 8 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 37
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 36
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 36

When his Uncle Mortimer died and left him Hoxne Grange, the family's Gilded Age mansion, Tristan Pryce became the second generation of Pryces to serve as a caretaker for the estate, a way station for spirits on their final steps to the afterlife. Tristan is prepared for challenges, though not necessarily from the ghosts he's seen since childhood.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Good paranormal M/M.

  • By Mary on 29-06-17

Really, really good.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 26-01-15

If you could sum up Fish and Ghosts in three words, what would they be?

Fun, exciting, romantic

What other book might you compare Fish and Ghosts to, and why?

I really can't, that's why I enjoyed it so much. The author has a really unique idea here and I absolutely loved it. It's of just as high quality as her other books but, as much as I loved the Sinners Gin saga, this seemed so much more believable to me (I know, ludicrous given the premise) and I loved it from the first word. Rhys Ford is definitely becoming my favourite (if not already is) m/m author.

What does Tristan James bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you had only read the book?

I honestly couldn't say as I haven't read the book. I know that I love his pacing, delivery and he really does keep me hooked on the story and makes it so easy to follow. My house seems very odd when I'm not hearing his voice at the moment as I've listened to him pretty much non-stop for the past month reading various Rhys Ford stories so for me the pairing of this performer and author is cemented in my head as the norm and I'm not sure I could listen to a Rhys Ford book without hearing his voice anyway.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

Any conversation between Tristan and his housekeeper. I much prefer her to the female matriach in Sinners Gin as she seems much more rounded and three dimensional. She's really well written and helps brings real depth to the story.

Any additional comments?

I loved all the Sinners Gin books, I really did, but this book is brilliant and I can't wait to get the next one. The reading of it is sublime and it just feels like the author has really progressed and their talent just shines through in this. I can honestly say that you'll find something to enjoy in any of Ford's stories and James' performance of it, but of you're a first time to either of them then this is the book to start off with. Excellent leads, strong supporting characters, a really intriguing premise and a FLAWLESS performance from James - you can't go wrong!