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JohnW

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  • Clothes, Clothes, Clothes. Music, Music, Music. Boys, Boys, Boys.

  • By: Viv Albertine
  • Narrated by: Jasmine Blackborow
  • Length: 13 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 38
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 35
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 35

In 1975, Viv Albertine was obsessed with music, but it never occurred to her she could be in a band, as she couldn't play an instrument, and she'd never seen a girl play electric guitar. A year later, she was the guitarist in the hugely influential all-girl band the Slits, who fearlessly took on the male-dominated music scene and became part of a movement that changed music. A raw, thrilling story of life on the frontiers and a candid account of Viv's life post-punk - taking in a career in film, the pain of IVF, illness and divorce and the triumph of making music again - Clothes, Clothes, Clothes. Music, Music, Music. Boys, Boys, Boys. is a remarkable memoir. 

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Sounds like a novel

  • By Venta on 30-01-19

Glad it eventually came out as an audiobook

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 22-02-19

I'm a listener not a reader so even though I'd heard and seen many reviews of this book when it came out (and bought the solo album that came out at the same time), I've only now caught up with this as an audiobook.
The book is really interesting and filled in a lot of holes in the various story threads that I read in music papers at the time. Viv's only a couple of years older than me so much of the early stuff rang very true.
Generally I thought the narration was excellent but ultimately it was the one thing that really grated about the book was the mispronunciation of some of the key players names, the main ones were Palmolive and Poly Styrene surely it's possible to make sure the narrator knows these things before starting out.
Overall - recommended and I'll be downloading Viv's second book soon.

  • Respect Yourself

  • Stax Records and the Soul Explosion
  • By: Robert Gordon
  • Narrated by: Cassandra Campbell
  • Length: 17 hrs and 54 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3

The story of Stax Records unfolds like a Greek tragedy. A white brother and sister build a record company that becomes a monument to racial harmony in 1960’s segregated south Memphis. Their success is startling, and Stax soon defines an international sound. Then, after losses both business and personal, the siblings part, and the brother allies with a visionary African-American partner. Under integrated leadership, Stax explodes as a national player until, Icarus-like, they fall from great heights to a tragic demise.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A complete and comprehensive record.

  • By Mr Potts on 15-05-19

Very good scene setter

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-06-18

I knew we were due to spend a week in Memphis so I downloaded the book. The historical context information about Memphis made our visit to the Civil Rights Museum far more interesting and while I was listening I knew that we would have to visit the studio as it is today.
I think anyone thinking of visiting either (or both) would find this book illuminates the visits.
The narration is so good, yet oddly unobtrusive that I found myself investigating the reader as well!
I was pleased that it seems equal effort was spent on the good times as the bad times and the detail in places was a credit.
Sometimes it seemed almost like a fiction but two weeks after I'd finished listening, we were standing outside at McLemore & College!

  • Fire and Rain

  • The Beatles, Simon and Garfunkel, James Taylor, CSNY and the Lost Story of 1970
  • By: David Browne
  • Narrated by: Sean Runnette
  • Length: 11 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 10
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10

January 1970: the Beatles assemble one more time to put the finishing touches on Let It Be; Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young are wrapping up Déjà Vu; Simon and Garfunkel are unveiling Bridge Over Troubled Water; James Taylor is an upstart singer-songwriter who's just completed Sweet Baby James. Over the course of the next twelve months, their lives---and the world around them---will change irrevocably.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Good journalism, boring narration

  • By Goldfrapper on 07-05-17

Were The Beatles really Irish?

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-06-15

Would you listen to Fire and Rain again? Why?

No, I've never listened to an Audiobook twice yet and, although very good, this is unlikely to be the first.

What three words best describe Sean Runnette’s voice?

Can't do accents

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

The Kent scene setting was particularly well presented.

Any additional comments?

I know the reader is American, I'm fine with that, he didn't seem to try to do regional accents when quoting US artists so why did he attempt such a thing when quoting British artists? We all know The Beatles were all Liverpudlian so why did they (and Graham Nash) end up with an Irish accent? It was rather off-putting. Otherwise a very interesting well woven (if there was a section that didn't interest me, it didn't dwell there too long) story. I'm glad I've got a Spotify sub as I was often using it to play the songs and albums talked about.