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Debra K

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  • 22
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  • 108
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  • The Furthest Station

  • A PC Peter Grant Novella
  • By: Ben Aaronovitch
  • Narrated by: Kobna Holdbrook-Smith
  • Length: 3 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,820
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1,693
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,683

There's something going bump on the Metropolitan line, and Sergeant Jaget Kumar knows exactly whom to call. It's PC Peter Grant's specialty.... Only it's more than going 'bump'. Traumatised travellers have been reporting strange encounters on their morning commute, with strangely dressed people trying to deliver an urgent message. Stranger still, despite calling the police themselves, within a few minutes the commuters have already forgotten the encounter - making the follow-up interviews rather difficult. 

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Ok but

  • By Jeffrey Slater on 06-10-17

Beautifully creepy

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 24-01-19

BA continues with a typically densely written tale, with a light touch. There is something a little sad and beautiful about this book. Enjoy.

  • The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck

  • A Counterintuitive Approach to Living a Good Life
  • By: Mark Manson
  • Narrated by: Roger Wayne
  • Length: 5 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,676
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,027
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,954

For decades we've been told that positive thinking is the key to a happy, rich life. "F*ck positivity," Mark Manson says. "Let's be honest, shit is f*cked, and we have to live with it." In his wildly popular Internet blog, Manson doesn't sugarcoat or equivocate. He tells it like it is - a dose of raw, refreshing, honest truth that is sorely lacking today. The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck is his antidote to the coddling, let's-all-feel-good mind-set that has infected modern society and spoiled a generation, rewarding them with gold medals just for showing up.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Worth a listen but nothing new or revolutionary.

  • By Alex Gerard Black on 21-01-18

An aroundabout take on viewing difficulties

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 24-01-19

Some useful view points to help balance inner dialogue. A great deal of attention paid to those with a sense of entitlement.

  • Betty Church and the Suffolk Vampire

  • A Betty Church Mystery Book 1
  • By: M. R. C. Kasasian
  • Narrated by: Emma Gregory
  • Length: 14 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 159
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 151
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 150

Inspector Betty Church - one of the few female officers on the force - has arrived from London to fill a vacancy at Sackwater police station. But Betty isn't new here. This is the place she grew up. Time ticks slowly in Sackwater. Having solved the case of the missing buttons, Betty's called to the train station to investigate a missing bench. But though there's no bench, there is a body. A smartly dressed man, murdered in broad daylight, with two distinctive puncture wounds in his throat. While the locals gossip about the Suffolk Vampire, Betty Church readies herself to hunt a dangerous killer.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Promising

  • By K on 06-12-18

Suffering fools

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-01-19

The enjoyable parts were to do with March, Sidney, learning about this new character Betty and some intriguing possibilities. However, the style of humor is a bit 'Dad's Army' and I could feel the empty silence where canned laughter would have been after every inane utterance and there is a ton of these.
Listening to Emma Gregory narrate is always a pleasure.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Travels with My Aunt

  • By: Graham Greene
  • Narrated by: Tim Pigott-Smith
  • Length: 9 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 329
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 283
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 285

Henry Pulling, a retired bank manager, meets his septuagenarian Aunt Augusta for the first time in over 50 years at his mother’s funeral. Soon after, she persuades Henry to abandon South wood, his dahlias and the Major next door to travel through Brighton, Paris, Istanbul, Paraguay...

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Hugely entertaining

  • By DartmoorDiva on 17-11-15

I didn't realise this was suppose to be funny

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-08-18

I found the characters in this book pretty awful. I hope the big reveal at the end was suppose to be ironic because it was blindingly obvious throughout. The protagonist marriage confirmed my theory that the whole bunch are irredeemable, yuk. The buzz about this novel was positive, so I may have missed something essential. I will not be recommending this novel to anyone. However, Tim Piggot-Smith's had a voice full of character and is soothing to listen to.

  • Northanger Abbey

  • By: Jane Austen
  • Narrated by: Juliet Stevenson
  • Length: 8 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 358
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 272
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 271

When Catherine Morland, a country clergyman's daughter, is invited to spend a season in Bath with the fashionable high society, little does she imagine the delights and perils that await her. Captivated and disconcerted by what she finds, and introduced to the joys of "Gothic novels" by her new friend, Isabella, Catherine longs for mystery and romance. When she is invited to stay with the beguiling Henry Tilney and his family at Northanger Abbey, she expects mystery and intrigue at every turn.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent

  • By Miss on 27-09-14

Recommend Mansfield Park instead.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-08-18

Northanger Abbey has a similar theme to Mansfield Park relating to so called friends and their double dealings. The protagonist in Northanger Abbey is a tad too daft for me to sympathise with her endless dilemmas and she will only accept the reality of deceit when it is repeatedly explained to her. If you prefer your Georgian heroines with a bit more brains about them, I suggest Mansfield Park instead.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Mansfield Park

  • By: Jane Austen
  • Narrated by: Juliet Stevenson
  • Length: 16 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 430
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 347
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 347

At the tender age of 10, Fanny Price is 'adopted' by her rich relations and is removed from the poverty of her home in Portsmouth to the opulence of Mansfield Park. The transplantation is not a happy one. Dependent, helpless, neglected and forgotten, Fanny struggles to come to terms with her new life until, tested almost to the limits of endurance, she assumes her righful role...

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A reluctant Janeite not reluctant any more.

  • By Colin Davey on 20-11-16

Long live Fanny Price

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-08-18

The main character's moral compass and especially her power of conviction blew me away as she never wavered despite enormous pressure to comply to social expectations and demands. Long live Fanny Price.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Jane Austen at Home

  • By: Lucy Worsley
  • Narrated by: Ruth Redman, Lucy Worsley
  • Length: 14 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 224
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 204
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 202

On the 200th anniversary of Jane Austen's death, historian Lucy Worsley leads us into the world in which our best-loved novelist lived. This new telling of the story of Jane's life shows us how and why she lived as she did, examining the rooms, spaces and possessions which mattered to her and the way in which home is used in her novels to mean both a place of pleasure and a prison. It wasn't all country houses and ballrooms; in fact her life was often a painful struggle.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Outstanding!

  • By Gabrielle Harvey-Jones on 27-05-17

"Every word is written with love".

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-07-18

This book does a nice cross reference with other Jane Austin biographies and recorded memoirs to give a broad view of her life and times. The descriptions make it easy to visualise Jane Austin's homes and family members, sometimes feeling insufferably stifling and at other times completely joyful and hopeful. Lucy Worsley makes regular comparisons to characters in Austin's novels that show a real love for the stories and a deep understanding Austin's motivations. Lucy narrates the introduction, where she says the quote in this headline and the epilogue,which were both funny and enlightening. Ruth Redman is also a very good narrator and her voice and steady style suited the subject perfectly.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry

  • By: Rachel Joyce
  • Narrated by: Jim Broadbent
  • Length: 9 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,465
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,921
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,916

When Harold Fry nips out one morning to post a letter, leaving his wife hoovering upstairs, he has no idea that he is about to walk from one end of the country to the other. He has no hiking boots or map, let alone a compass, waterproof, or mobile phone. All he knows is that he must keep walking - to save someone else's life.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Gentle but engaging

  • By Ms on 17-06-12

Pilgrimage to sanity

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 14-06-18

To follow such a gentle, kind and unassuming character as Harold Fry throughout was a lesson on an effective and human approach to achieving goals. Harold is lost but his innate selfish-less and determination to do the right thing forms his moral compass. Harold's pilgrimage is an inspiration. There are funny moments and wry observations as Harold deals with the good and bad of human nature. I recommend this book to anyone who enjoys through provoking, quirky and charming novels.

  • Never Let Me Go

  • By: Kazuo Ishiguro
  • Narrated by: Kerry Fox
  • Length: 9 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 936
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 866
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 868

In one of the most acclaimed novels of recent years, Kazuo Ishiguro imagines the lives of a group of students growing up in a darkly skewed version of contemporary England. Narrated by Kathy, now thirty-one, Never Let Me Go dramatizes her attempts to come to terms with her childhood at the seemingly idyllic Hailsham School and with the fate that has always awaited her and her closest friends in the wider world.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Haunting and thought provoking

  • By Stephibobz on 08-09-15

Definitely not romantic mush.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-06-18

Feel kinda flooded with dystopia books, films and TV just now. However, this book is one of the creepiest due to how normal the lives and destinies appear to the characters. There is little to no questioning of the system, which I found chilling and unreal. I equally found the premise doubtful and gratuitous.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Memento Mori

  • Roman Empire Series, Book 8
  • By: Ruth Downie
  • Narrated by: Simon Vance
  • Length: 10 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 54
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 49
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 49

A scandal is threatening to engulf the popular spa town of Aquae Sulis (modern-day Bath). The wife of Ruso's best friend, Valens, has been found dead in the sacred hot spring, stabbed through the heart. Fearing the wrath of the goddess and the ruin of the tourist trade, the temple officials are keen to cover up what's happened. But the dead woman's father is demanding justice, and he's accusing Valens of murder. If Valens turns up to face trial, he will risk execution. If he doesn't, he'll lose his children.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The odd couple in Bath

  • By Mary Carnegie on 14-04-18

Yay, Ruso's back

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-06-18

I really enjoy what I call the Ruso series of books and snapped this up as soon as I saw it. It didn't disappoint, it was as nail biting and funny as always. A new location for Ruso and company that inspired me to look up the Roman history of this city. This was a very good listen and well narrated. If you enjoy historic drama type books with a capable but fallible characters, you may well become a Ruso fan too.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful