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  • The Silkworm

  • Cormoran Strike, Book 2
  • By: Robert Galbraith
  • Narrated by: Robert Glenister
  • Length: 17 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,485
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,937
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,917

When novelist Owen Quine goes missing, his wife calls in private detective Cormoran Strike. At first, she just thinks he has gone off by himself for a few days - as he has done before - and she wants Strike to find him and bring him home. But as Strike investigates, it becomes clear that there is more to Quine's disappearance than his wife realises. The novelist has just completed a manuscript featuring poisonous pen-portraits of almost everyone he knows. If the novel were published it would ruin lives - so there are a lot of people who might want to silence him.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 star rating based on quality not name

  • By Linda on 06-08-14

Too long

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 17-09-14

Would you be willing to try another book from Robert Galbraith? Why or why not?

This is the second Robert Galbraith book I have read. The Cuckoo's Calling promised and delivered much, but I was disappointed with this one. Although Robin's character is developing well Cormoran's seems to be at a standstill, and there is too much time spent describing the pain he suffers from his war wound. Keep a stiff upper lip Mr. Strike.

What about Robert Glenister’s performance did you like?

Robert Glenister's ability to produce a range of accents and voices, both male and female is a joy to listen to.

  • The Monogram Murders

  • The New Hercule Poirot Mystery
  • By: Sophie Hannah
  • Narrated by: Julian Rhind-Tutt
  • Length: 11 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 645
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 603
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 606

Hercule Poirot's quiet supper in a London coffee house is interrupted when a young woman confides to him that she is about to be murdered. She is terrified, but begs Poirot not to find and punish her killer. Once she is dead, she insists, justice will have been done. Later that night, Poirot learns that three guests at a fashionable London hotel have been murdered, and a cufflink has been placed in each one's mouth. Could there be a connection with the frightened woman?

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • The Boring Monogram Murders

  • By Ulla on 18-09-14

There's a good plot here…somewhere

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 17-09-14

Would you say that listening to this book was time well-spent? Why or why not?

Sadly only parts of this book grabbed my attention and I was relieved when the narration finished. It seemed to go on for ever, and even the denouement lasted for more than three hours. Not good use of my time.

Would you recommend The Monogram Murders to your friends? Why or why not?

I wouldn't recommend this book to ardent Christie fans. Although parts were reminiscent of Christie's excellent Poirot stories The Monogram Murders was overlong, over-complicated and had too many characters, many of whom served no real purpose.

Would you listen to another book narrated by Julian Rhind-Tutt?

Julian Rhind-Tutt had a difficult task in trying to make so many characters sound unique. By and large he managed and produced a credible Hercule Poirot voice. On this basis I'd listen to other books narrated by him.

Could you see The Monogram Murders being made into a movie or a TV series? Who would the stars be?

With very heavy editing this might make a half decent 'made-for-TV' film, but who could be cast as Poirot if David Suchet turns the part down?

14 of 15 people found this review helpful

The Blood Detective cover art
  • The Blood Detective

  • By: Dan Waddell
  • Narrated by: Colin Mace
  • Length: 8 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 83
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 24
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 24

As dawn breaks over London, the body of a young man is discovered in a windswept Notting Hill churchyard. The killer has left Detective Chief Inspector Grant Foster and his team a grisly, cryptic clue... However it's not until the clue is handed to Nigel Barnes, a specialist in compiling family trees, that the full message becomes spine-chillingly clear. For it leads Barnes back more than one hundred years - to the victim of a demented Victorian serial killer.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Is this his first novel?

  • By Ronald on 06-06-09

An outstanding book

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 29-01-10

What a superb story, so different from many run-of-the-mill books of this genre. Characterisation is good and the reader makes identification of the different characters, through voice alone, easy. Dan Waddell skillfully weaves crime fiction with geneological research in a tale that had me guessing almost to the end. I'm looking forward to downloading his next book.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful