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Anonimo Nonlodico

  • 33
  • reviews
  • 57
  • helpful votes
  • 156
  • ratings
  • Catching Fire

  • How Cooking made us Human
  • By: Richard Wrangham
  • Narrated by: Kevin Pariseau
  • Length: 6 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 19
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 12
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12

Ever since Darwin and The Descent of Man, the existence of humans has been attributed to our intelligence and adaptability. But in Catching Fire, renowned primatologist Richard Wrangham presents a startling alternative: our evolutionary success is the result of cooking. In a groundbreaking theory of our origins, Wrangham shows that the shift from raw to cooked foods was the key factor in human evolution. When our ancestors adapted to using fire, humanity began.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fantastic Evolutionary Psychology and Anthropology

  • By Jeanette on 01-07-12

Interesting but fundamentally incorrect

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-12-18

We evolved as carnivores, subsisting on fatty meat for millions of years. The author fails to grasp the existence of the megafauna and its significance to our evolution. The fact that he’s a vegetarian isn’t helping either, he’s motivated to justify his extreme and dangerous diet.

  • A Brief History of Britain 1660 - 1851

  • Brief Histories
  • By: William Gibson
  • Narrated by: Roger Davis
  • Length: 12 hrs and 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 41
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 34
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 35

In 1660 England emerged from the devastations of the Civil Wars and restored the king, Charles II, to the throne. Over the next 190 years Britain would establish itself as the leading nation in the world - the centre of burgeoning Empire, at the forefront of the Enlightenment and the Industrial Revolution. However, radical change also brought with it anxiety and violence. America is lost in the War of Independence and calls for revolution at home are never far from the surface of everyday life.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • One damn thing after another

  • By Anonimo Nonlodico on 19-02-18

One damn thing after another

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-02-18

Disappointing. Completely lacking in deeper reflection. Just a long litany of unconnected facts. Sad! I had to return it.

  • Mismatch

  • How Our Stone Age Brain Deceives Us Every Day (and What We Can Do About It)
  • By: Ronald Giphart, Mark van Vugt
  • Narrated by: Roger Davis
  • Length: 12 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 9
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 9
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 8

Our brains evolved to solve the survival problems of our Stone Age ancestors, so when faced with modern-day situations that are less extreme, they often encounter a mismatch. Our primitive brains put us on the wrong foot by responding to stimuli that - in prehistoric times - would have prompted behaviour that was beneficial. If you've ever felt an anxious fight-or-flight response to a presenting at a board meeting, equivalent to facing imminent death by sabre-toothed tiger, then you have experienced a mismatch.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Superficial, patchy and quite often factually incorrect

  • By Anonimo Nonlodico on 18-02-18

Superficial, patchy and quite often factually incorrect

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 18-02-18

This is a well written and easy to listen to book on an important subject. It could serve as an introduction to readers unfamiliar with it. The problem is, many areas are treated very superficially, some are omitted altogether despite their importance and some information is simply factually wrong. I’m rather disappointed and will return this audiobook.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Utopia for Realists

  • By: Rutger Bregman
  • Narrated by: Peter Noble
  • Length: 6 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 549
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 506
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 501

We live in a time of unprecedented upheaval, when technology and so-called progress have made us richer but more uncertain than ever before. We have questions about the future, society, work, happiness, family and money, and yet no political party of the right or left is providing us with answers. So, too, does the time seem to be coming to an end when we looked to economists to help us define the qualities necessary to create a successful society. We need a new movement.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Food for thought...

  • By Lister on 18-04-17

Economically illiterate propaganda piece for the new left

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 27-01-18

Leftist populism devoid of economic understanding. One long propaganda piece. Distorted vision of intellectual and economic history too. No serious consideration given to arguments against the author’s thesis. Anyone interested in serious intellectual arguments on the subject would do much better listening to Ludwig von Mises’ “Liberalism in the classical tradition”.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • On the Historicity of Jesus

  • Why We Might Have Reason for Doubt
  • By: Richard Carrier
  • Narrated by: Richard Carrier
  • Length: 28 hrs and 8 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 62
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 56
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 54

The assumption that Jesus existed as a historical person has occasionally been questioned in the course of the last hundred years or so, but any doubts that have been raised have usually been put to rest in favor of imagining a blend of the historical, the mythical, and the theological in the surviving records of Jesus. Historian and philosopher Richard Carrier reexamines the whole question and finds compelling reasons to suspect the more daring assumption is correct.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Even more convincing than I thought it would be!

  • By Jack on 14-03-16

Thorough, informative and well written

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 16-01-18

Solid examination of historical evidence. Careful application of conditional probability and Bayes theorem. Decent style. Highly recommended for anyone seriously interested in the subject.

  • The Case Against Sugar

  • By: Gary Taubes
  • Narrated by: Mike Chamberlain
  • Length: 11 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 158
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 143
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 137

Among Americans, diabetes is more prevalent today than ever. Obesity is at epidemic proportions; nearly 10% of children are thought to have nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. And sugar is at the root of these, and other, critical, society-wide, health-related problems. With his signature command of both science and straight talk, Gary Taubes delves into Americans' history with sugar: its uses as a preservative, as an additive in cigarettes, the contemporary overuse of high-fructose corn syrup.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Mike Chamberlain's style is extremely irritating

  • By JoLovely on 24-03-17

Highly important and well written

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 28-04-17

Very powerful book, addressing directly one of the most important issues of our era. Well written, pleasant to listen to, highly enjoyable despite the seriousness of the subject. 10/10, would recommend.

  • Les Liaisons Dangereuses

  • Read by the Cast of the Stage Play
  • By: Choderlos de Laclos
  • Narrated by: Dominic West, Janet McTeer, Una Stubbs, and others
  • Length: 2 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 309
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 273
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 270

From the sumptuous private drawing rooms of 18th-century Paris to the decadent estates and chateaus of the French countryside, La Marquise de Merteuil and Le Vicomte de Valmont hatch a long-distance plan of vengeance and seduction. Valmont is determined to conquer the famously pious Madame de Tourvel, whose husband is abroad on business. However, Merteuil has other plans.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A timeless tale of lust and revenge

  • By Ms. D. A. O'neil on 05-02-16

Great dramatisation, extremely abbreviated and simplified story though

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 13-12-16

Between the translation and all the cuts, most of the finesse of the original French novel seems lost. A complex, multilayered, rich in detail saga becomes just a simple story. At least the dramatisation is well done...

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Does Capitalism Have a Future?

  • By: Immanuel Wallerstein, Randall Collins, Michael Mann, and others
  • Narrated by: Stephen Hoye
  • Length: 9 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 3
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 3

In Does Capitalism Have a Future?, a global quintet of distinguished scholars cut their way through to the question of whether our capitalist system can survive in the medium run. Despite the current gloom, conventional wisdom still assumes that there is no real alternative to capitalism. The authors argue that this generalization is a mistaken outgrowth of the optimistic nineteenth-century claim that human history ascends through stages to an enlightened equilibrium of liberal capitalism.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent socio economic analysis of current world

  • By E on 05-09-14

Marxist lunacy

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 26-11-16

Shockingly bad. Completely economically illiterate. Unless you are interested in radical left and its understanding of the current economic and social systems, avoid.

0 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Creating Freedom

  • Power, Control and the Fight for Our Future
  • By: Raoul Martinez
  • Narrated by: Jot Davies
  • Length: 18 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 57
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 54
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 54

The ideal of freedom is at the heart of our political and economic system. It is foundational to our sense of justice, our way of life, our conception of what it is to be human. But are we free in the way that we think we are? In Creating Freedom, Raoul Martinez brings together a torrent of mind-expanding ideas, facts and arguments to dismantle sacred myths central to our society - myths about free will, free markets, free media and free elections.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Amazing food for thought

  • By Christoph Fischer on 10-08-17

Marxist propaganda piece

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-10-16

The author is an economically illiterate marxist. The whole purpose of the book is communist propaganda. It's all quite simple and rather predictable. False dichotomies presented time and again. The other side is completely strawmanned.

If you want an intelligent book on politics and economics, I would suggest The Myth of the Rational Voter instead.

3 of 19 people found this review helpful

  • The Romanovs: 1613-1918

  • By: Simon Sebag Montefiore
  • Narrated by: Simon Russell Beale
  • Length: 28 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 466
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 419
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 413

The Romanovs were the most successful dynasty of modern times, ruling a sixth of the world's surface. How did one family turn a war-ruined principality into the world's greatest empire? And how did they lose it all? This is the intimate story of 20 tsars and tsarinas, some touched by genius, some by madness, but all inspired by holy autocracy and imperial ambition.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fantastic content and narration

  • By H L Condliffe on 03-06-16

Superficial and disappointing

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-09-16

History is just one damned thing after another. This just about sums the approach of the author here. Very little deeper reflection or original thought. Let's add that the choice of facts is often dubious as well, with strange emphasis placed on sexual lives of the Romanovs. Bizarre treatment of personal names and nicknames plus often painfully incorrect pronunciation of Russian, Ukrainian, Polish, German and French top it off. Avoid!