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Nayu

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Chilling read

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 20-04-17

Would you consider the audio edition of The Missing to be better than the print version?

I don't know because I haven't read the print version.

Who was your favorite character and why?

I can't say I exactly liked Greta, but I guess she was my favourite character if I had to pick one. Greta had a horrific childhood, which she didn't necessarily remember accurately. Her recent present life had it's own horrors which had me almost stop listening for good as they got really unpleasant (that's the exotic relationships part in the content warning). It's not exactly easy to skim past sections I don't like on audiobook as I do with a physical/ebook. But because I was desperate to know if there was a happy ending I kept going until the end, which managed to confuse me because I may have misunderstood what a character said to another (it could mean certain death which Greta miraculously avoided up to the end).

Which scene did you most enjoy?

Probably the end where some characters had a bit of relief.

If you made a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

No idea, sorry.

Any additional comments?

I must state I really loved this book, even if my initial comments may seem to hint the opposite. It was the most confusing read I've ever listened to/read. As someone who can struggle with concentrating because I read when I'm tired (any time of day), following a story with both multiple viewpoints and flashbacks made me thoroughly confused most of the time. I didn't know until the end whether Greta was hallucinating, having a mental breakdown, having cruel tricks played on her. I won't avoid similar reads in the future because I absolutely loved the way tidbits of necessary info was spread throughout the book. It was information that either confirmed my theories or simply confused me some more.

The narration was first class, I was completely immersed into the insanity of the characters and the plot. I think I will relisten to it eventually, after many fluffy listens-I was a bit disturbed emotionally by the end and had to placate the horrors with super cute gaming, as the topics are very hard hitting and made me sad for those whose live through similar goings on.

I received a copy from Audible in exchange for an honest review on my blog Nayu's Reading Corner

1 person found this helpful

A timeless children's classic

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 20-04-17

Would you consider the audio edition of Anne of Green Gables to be better than the print version?

I haven't read the print version, so I don't know.

What did you like best about this story?

Anne's personality, she's an extraordinary child! I couldn't believe how hilarious Anne was. The narrator's voice reminded me of Anna in Frozen, as did how much Anne could talk and her fanciful thinking. Her melodrama did remind me of Amy in Little Women, but overall Anne is a unique character who I gave up anime time just to listen to her exploits. I liked her that much. She is constantly talking, adding drama to non-dramatic events which does drive her adopted parents a little mad, but while her adopted mother slash Aunt rarely shows her amusement, Anne's mannerisms bring lots of love and light to her new home.

What does Rachel McAdams bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you had only read the book?

I wouldn't have necessarily read it as I don't like most books termed as classic literature, she brought it to life!

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

I have to say I preferred the earlier parts of the book when Anne was still a child and getting into an insane amount of scrapes: the later part of the book got a bit more serious, and there was less mischief which I heartily missed. You'll need tissues, that's all I'll say about it, and Anne has to grow up fast. She was 16 or so by the end, so in our day still a teen but back then 16 was classed as an adult which is why Anne has to make a few personal sacrifices when life circumstances change.

Any additional comments?

I knew that Anne was firm friends with Diana before I read the book, which made me curious as to how the two became best friends when an incident split the two up and I couldn't see how they would get back together. You know the times in life where accidents happen which aren't the person involved's fault, yet they get the blame? Those happen to Anne a lot, and were highly amusing to hear about. Anne's love of melodrama does mean her sincerity is sometimes not seen by those she is apologising to, at least not the first time round. Life is never dull with Anne.

I received a copy from Audible in exchange for an honest review on my blog Nayu's Reading Corner

Insightful to life with anorexia

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 20-04-17

What made the experience of listening to The Food of Love the most enjoyable?

Until I wrote this review I hadn't realised that Amanda was the narrator, which is really cool because she knows exactly how each voice should be! & the voices work really well. Shortly after finishing this book it was temporarily unavailable on Audible, who I'm reviewing it for. It may be because closer to the end there were several parts which hadn't been edited out, where Amanda made a mistake in the narration and then repeated herself. I personally didn't mind this, one of the unintended out-takes was hilarious, and answered a question I'd had as to how audiobooks in general are recorded. Thankfully you can now purchase it!

What other book might you compare The Food of Love to, and why?

I haven't got one to compare it to.

Which character – as performed by Amanda Prowse – was your favourite?

It's hard to define one as they were all so brilliantly narrated. I adore family centred reads, which this definitely is. How Lexi's anorexia is discovered had me in tears. Freya goes into a lot of denial which drives her husband potty (at one point I thought they'd split up because of their differing views about Lexi).

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

The lengths Lexi goes to avoid eating are so sad to read, knowing that many people in real life suffer similarly. What is most apparent is the bonds of love between all the family members. No matter how they feel about each individual situation, even when they are extremely mad at each other, they are linked through family love, and do what needs doing rather than what they want to do when times are tough.

Any additional comments?

There is a lot of discord, especially when Freya is trying to pretend Lexi is getting past the anorexia. I sighed a lot when Freya lived in lala land (aka denial), but as both the family and myself were shocked with more revelations about the seriousness of Lexi's condition, Freya and reality met up. It was interesting that Freya knew she was too close to Freya to take difficult decisions, which made the medical and psychological help provided by the medical team very welcome, as some things were taken out of their hands.

There was a very good depiction as to how anorexia affects siblings: poor Charlotte got forgotten about a lot while Lexi was the centre of their parents' interests. She had to skip out on going to events, especially when new disasters cropped up. Naturally Charlotte got a little bitter about it, but she was able to work though that in a sweet way that made me cry. This is an extremely shocking read, I think it's true-to-life too, and I had to take a few breaks in listening to it because it got a bit too hard at times, but that's a personal issue I have. I take a lot of things to heart, which is why I don't read lots of books like this close together. I love it, and I'm already looking forward to relistening to it!

I received a copy of this from Audible in exchange for an honest review on my blog Nayu's Reading Corner

A touching read

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 20-04-17

Where does All I Ever Wanted rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

Very highly due to the quality of the plot and characterisation

What was one of the most memorable moments of All I Ever Wanted?

When Caitlin finally spoke again.

Have you listened to any of Lucy Price-Lewis’s other performances? How does this one compare?

Can't remember.

Did you have an emotional reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

My interest was piqued by Caitlin's daughter losing her voice, and the twists that follow kept me captivated until the end. I can't say much about the prologue without giving spoilers but it really set up the story, and I was on tenderhooks throughout most of the book waiting for Caitlin to somehow figure out why Nancy stopped talking. She is such a sweet girl, very expressive even without a voice. She has a deep link with her brother Joel, who takes her not talking in his stride, somehow knowing what she wants and protecting her as much as he can from people misunderstanding her silence, which was heartwaarming.

I felt so sorry for Caitlin, because she's going through several major issues (child not talking, separation). Occasionally I was surprised she didn't take further action with Nancy's silence, but she was doing her best. Separation (and divorce) is far from simple, and with support from an unexpected ally Caitlin battles through it, almost always putting her children first. I hated when others criticized Caitlin because they weren't the ones in the situation (or if they were they were on the other side of the fence so had a skewed view of Caitlin from the onset).

Any additional comments?

Caitlin's not perfect but she's not a terrible mother either. She does struggle with seeing Eva who appears to be perfect, but having chapters with Eva's point of view helped me understand her further, and made me want to tell Caitlin to give Eva a chance. Eva ends up being the key to unlocking Nancy's voice again in a sweet way which made me tear up when it happened. Although Caitlin doesn't realise it Eva becomes a form of stability within her chaotic life which she sorely needs, and so do the children. I'm looking forward to relistening to this family centred read which gives a lot to think about.

I received a copy of this audiobook from Audible in exchange for an honest review on my blog Nayu's Reading Corner

Tissue needing read

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-12-16

What made the experience of listening to Two by Two the most enjoyable?

It was a beautiful tale about Russell first becoming a father, then due to partially circumstancial separation with his wife, becomes a single dad. It's really tough on him, as it is for any single parent. He learns he can't rely on his family in some respects as much as he naievely hoped to constantly babysit his adorable girl while he works. He has a lot of hurdles, some he stumbles over, but thanks to his close relationship with his sister and a reconnected friendship with a woman he knew in the past he has enough support to get through the tough times.

Who was your favorite character and why?

Russell's daughter who is a sweetheart and most definitely stuck in the middle between her parents.

What about Ari Fliakos’s performance did you like?

All of it, it was a smooth performance, the female parts weren't jarring as they can be with male voices, the pacing was good too.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Yes! It's a charming read, I kept wanting to know what happened next to Russell, especially when things got ugly with the divorce. It got a bit daunting when the separation became an official thing, and it looked like he might lose custody of his daughter, as the two were close (no matter what his wife's lawyer said) and I was heartbroken by the thought of the two being separated. What got insinuated at one point had me fuming and feeling sick for Russell, as the implications were horrendous. As for the title, well it makes sense due to music and a children's book.

Any additional comments?

Will definitely relisten to it & recommend it to others.

Great amnesia tale

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-12-16

Would you listen to Family Tree again? Why?

Most definitely! It's a motivating read, makes my memory lapses seem not quite as bad as Annie, and

What other book might you compare Family Tree to, and why?

House Trained by Jackie Bouchard. Both Annie (Family Tree) and Alex deal with life changing incidents which requires them to adapt to their new circumstances. They have some failings, but manage triumph in the end, just not in the way they originally expected.

What does Christina Traister bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you had only read the book?

I don't really know, as audiobooks feel the same as normal books to me. I only listen to them because it's less tiring than reading, which is necessary since I have a medical condition with high fatigue and love reading so was a bit frustrated before I found audiobooks.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

No. Not because it isn't good, or that in some places I found the plot dragging (which may be because I listen when I'm tired), but because it was a bit of a deep emotional book, and I mostly need light reads so had to take time out to relax.

Any additional comments?

I felt sorry for Annie prior to the accident causing a year long coma, and very sorry after. It was so tough on her to not remember things, to have to relearn how to move her body, to get used to the initial high fatigue which is hard because she was previously a very active person. Her evil ex becomes even evil-er (no such word but who cares), which made me feel even sorrier for Annie. Annie isn't one to mope (much), she works as hard as she can to find her feet following her coma. Thankfully she does have the support of her family, which in itself is a bit of a surprise because there were some issues with her father prior to the coma, so she's got something extra to deal with on top of everything else.

I did cry a few times because there are moments when life overwhelms Annie. She rekindles friendship with someone from the past who could play a big part in her future. She learns the truth behind her previous job in the food cooking show business, which is cruel, and reignites her passion for food (once she's allowed in the kitchen), which is an outlet for any frustrations and her family get to try all the yummy food she creates.