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Mark

  • 14
  • reviews
  • 33
  • helpful votes
  • 59
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  • Theory of Everything

  • An Integral Vision for Business, Politics, Science and Spirituality
  • By: Ken Wilber
  • Narrated by: Fajer Al-Kaisi
  • Length: 5 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 20
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 17
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 17

Here is a concise, comprehensive overview of Wilber's revolutionary thought and its application in today's world. In A Theory of Everything, Wilber uses clear, nontechnical language to present complex, cutting-edge theories that integrate the realms of body, mind, soul, and spirit. He then demonstrates how these theories and models can be applied to real-world problems in areas such as politics, medicine, business, education, and the environment.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A genuine open and truly logical vision.

  • By M on 25-06-18

Pompous overbearing self-referencing dry & boring

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 28-03-16

If the author quotes another one of his works one more time as a reference... This book is boring and dry. The reader is flat and uninteresting. It sounds like an academic lecture and tries to scan like an academic work with lots of references. And given nearly all the references are to the author's other works or to works the author claims to have influenced - then it just ends up sounding like bragging, If there is an actual IDEA in this book, then our dear self important writer takes so long to get to the actual point that I have... Ah wait - yes of course - DIED - death of ego - enlightenment - is this what he tries to achieve? Bore the listener to death and hope the ego drops away? I can't imagine what it must be like being this man's poor wife - or maybe "honey I have this idea" is the perfect way to get to sleep every night? Sorry - what is this book about again!

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Waking Up

  • By: Sam Harris
  • Narrated by: Sam Harris
  • Length: 5 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,204
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,034
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,015

For the millions of people who want spirituality without religion, Sam Harris’s new book is a guide to meditation as a rational spiritual practice informed by neuroscience and psychology. From bestselling author, neuroscientist, and “new atheist” Sam Harris, Waking Up is for the increasingly large numbers of people who follow no religion, but who suspect that Jesus, Buddha, Lao Tzu, Rumi, and the other saints and sages of history could not have all been epileptics, schizophrenics, or frauds.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • This is Important.

  • By Lucas on 15-02-15

Keep coming back to this book

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 26-01-16

Rational yet expansive. This book is well written and ties up a lot of loose ends. Recommended.

  • Detox Your Ego

  • 7 Easy Steps to Achieving Freedom, Happiness and Success in Your Life
  • By: Steven Sylvester
  • Narrated by: Des Yankson
  • Length: 8 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars 18
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars 16
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 17

What stops you from winning and performing at your best? Your ego. Your ego ensures you get in the way of yourself when you're doing something important: whether you're preparing for school exams, taking your driving test, playing a sport, speaking in public or making a business presentation. Whatever you do, your ego is sure to interfere with your performance. We all have egos: it's our natural defence system which is triggered when we experience strong emotions, such as anxiety and fear.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Has given me a real sense of power in my life

  • By Victoria N on 03-05-16

Smug kindergarten psychobabble

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 14-01-16

Narrate your own book! The guy reading this makes it sound even more smug! Not being egotistical? Helping others? This is the biggest ego trip of all. Having just read The Antidote in contrast this book is utter rubbish - so bad I don't think I will ever reach the end of it and will almost certainly be asking for a refund. Why would the story flow better if you read it yourself? Because the narrator simply doesn't understand the book. Oh and STOP LOOK LISTEN is just twee and condescending. ABC and a woman called Jane? Did Ladybird publish this? Is the whole thing just a joke? Sorry but you should really rewrite it. The underlying concept is on the right track but the context missed the most important point!

2 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Born on a Blue Day

  • A Memoir of Asperger's and an Extraordinary Mind
  • By: Daniel Tammet
  • Narrated by: Daniel Tammet
  • Length: 2 hrs and 57 mins
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 34
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 19
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 20

Daniel Tammet can perform extraordinary maths in his head, sees numbers as shapes, colours, textures, and motions, and can learn to speak a language fluently from scratch in three days. He also has a compulsive need for order and routine. He eats exactly 45 grams of porridge for breakfast and cannot leave the house without counting the number of items of clothing he's wearing. If he gets stressed or unhappy, he closes his eyes and counts. But in some ways, Daniel is not all like the Rain Man.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I am diagnosed with Aspergers too

  • By Mark on 12-01-16

I am diagnosed with Aspergers too

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-01-16

Thank you so much for your book Daniel and for taking the time to narrate it. I bought the hard cover book when you wrote it and it kicked around the house for years without getting read. I find it quite hard to concentrate on books so I was really pleased to see the audiobook turn up here. Your story is really interesting and hearing someone else talk about autism and their experience of it always helps me with my own puzzling mind.
I really enjoyed the book and it is one I will listen to again.
Thanks.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

The Antidote cover art
  • The Antidote

  • Happiness for People Who Can’t Stand Positive Thinking
  • By: Oliver Burkeman
  • Narrated by: Oliver Burkeman
  • Length: 6 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 652
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 548
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 527

In this fascinating new book which he narrates himself, Oliver Burkeman argues that "positive thinking" and relentless optimism aren't the solution to the happiness dilemma, but part of the problem. And that there is, in fact, an alternative path to contentment and success that involves embracing the things we spend our lives trying to avoid - uncertainty, insecurity, pessimism, and failure. Thought-provoking, counterintuitive, and ultimately uplifting, The Antidote is a celebration of the power of negative thinking.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • No Antidote just another path to the truth

  • By Mark on 11-01-13

I live in Glastonbury for God sake...

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-01-16

I live in Glastonbury for God sake... A place it seems where all who tread a spiritual path must pass through. Eckhart Tolle used to live here. Other self styled gurus come here on a regular basis and hold satsangs. There is an ashram and an organic supermarket which sells raw food. There are pilgrimages, séances and tarot.

My fortune however is to be surrounded by people who are negative about being negative. There seems to be an irony in noticing that some of the most negative people here are positive thinkers. "You gotta think positive man!" grasping a pint of cider and pulling strong tobacco from a hand rolled cigarette. "You are always so negative, so miserable, no wonder nobody wants to be around you" - and in turn I have come to be negative with myself about being negative. I mean being told nobody likes you for your negativity is not exactly positive feedback is it? So on reading the synopsis this book looked like it was just what I needed.

This book is more than that. I have read Alan Watts and if you asked me what it was about I would struggle to tell you. This young man's explanation of both Eckhart Tolle and Alan Watts philosophy was a clear pointer to the realms of consciousness their work points to.

As I listened to this book, while walking my dog, on the High Street I stopped and stared at a lamppost and experienced on of those huge transformational shifts. "Is this Mark looking at a lamppost? or is looking at a lamppost happening?" I think the revelation that unfolded was that positive thinkers tend to make oneness an identity and I have been guilty of buying into this fantasy. It is obvious that the symbolic self "Mark" does not exist as a separate thing. Not so obvious that oneness itself has no identity.

The last thing I was expecting from this book was a random awakening / recognition of deeper awareness experience while walking the dog.

Or to suddenly find it is perfectly okay to be a miserable old sod. In fact I can now get on with my miserable life and celebrate this as a way of being.

OH JOY!

All in all a thoroughly enjoyable read.

  • The Leader's Guide to Storytelling

  • Mastering the Art and Discipline of Business Narrative, Revised and Updated
  • By: Stephen Denning
  • Narrated by: Graeme Malcolm
  • Length: 10 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 9
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 6
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 6

This revised and updated edition of the best-selling book A Leader's Guide to Storytelling shows how storytelling is one of the few ways to handle the most important and difficult challenges of leadership: sparking action, getting people to work together, and leading people into the future. Using myriad illustrative examples and filled with how-to techniques, this book clearly explains how you can learn to tell the right story at the right time.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • The book is so dull I can't bear to finish it :-(

  • By Mark on 04-06-14

The book is so dull I can't bear to finish it :-(

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-06-14

Some good general advice but the format it so convoluted that now half way through the book, I seem to have unlearned half of it through boredom and confusion. It is so dry. I bought the book because the person who read it sounded a bit like Sir Ken Robinson and I love his delivery. And while Graeme Malcolm modulates, it is just feelingless, like he is not really connected with the material he is reading? Yesterday, I noticed I have over 5 hours left to listen to, so I actually started a new book. I expect I will give up and get a refund so I can learn how to story tell from someone else. They are a few good solid arguments but perhaps if the author thought about how to convey the information, rather than trying to prove how clever he is, it might be a more dynamic and interesting read.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Breaking the Spell

  • Religion as a Natural Phenomenon
  • By: Daniel C. Dennett
  • Narrated by: Dennis Holland
  • Length: 12 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 39
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 37
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 37

For all the thousands of books that have been written about religion, few until this one have attempted to examine it scientifically: to ask why - and how - it has shaped so many lives so strongly. Is religion a product of blind evolutionary instinct or rational choice? Is it truly the best way to live a moral life? Ranging through biology, history, and psychology, Daniel C. Dennett charts religion’s evolution from “wild” folk belief to “domesticated” dogma.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Poor narration cheapens an otherwise great book

  • By Robert on 04-12-16

I just can't get past the condescending tone

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-03-14

I am open minded. I listen to books by authors from all walks of life on a variety of subjects. I am interested in humanity and what makes the species tick. I particularly enjoy books on religion by philosophers because they ask questions which open my mind to new possibilities, make me think and expand my world. This book assumes too much. The author spends too much time at the beginning of the book telling me what I would not be willing to do and trying to justify the way he writes without telling me a damn thing. This author claims to be open minded and yet is more pious about his standpoint than most religious advocates. Worse still, the narrator has chosen a condescending tone to voice the authors ideas. Disappointing and hard to listen to.

5 of 16 people found this review helpful

  • Surfaces and Essences

  • Analogy as the Fuel and Fire of Thinking
  • By: Douglas Hofstadter, Emmanuel Sander
  • Narrated by: Sean Pratt
  • Length: 33 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 12
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 10
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 9

Analogy is the core of all thinking. This is the simple but unorthodox premise that Pulitzer Prize-winning author Douglas Hofstadter and French psychologist Emmanuel Sander defend in their new work. Hofstadter has been grappling with the mysteries of human thought for over 30 years. Now, with his trademark wit and special talent for making complex ideas vivid, he has partnered with Sander to put forth a highly novel perspective on cognition.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Trivial and laboured

  • By Louisa on 13-09-17

I simply cannot get on with this book

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-05-13

I am not sure if it is the narrator or the content but this book just drags and drags and drags on and on and on in the first few hours and has made no startling revelations to keep me on the edge of my seat waiting for the next chapter. Douglas Hofstadter seems like an interesting man but if I am going to listen for 33 hours, it needs to be way more entertaining than this. If I was doing a PhD in Analogy perhaps it would be riveting? But alas and despite being a listener with above average intelligence I am bored to death. Maybe it is fascinating later? I'll give it three stars just in case. Or perhaps this work is from a paradigm so alien in concept that my mind simply can't deal with it and I keep falling asleep listening to it. I will not be finishing the book and I am going to return it and get a credit. If I ever get insomnia...

3 of 7 people found this review helpful

Ubik cover art
  • Ubik

  • By: Philip K. Dick
  • Narrated by: Anthony Heald
  • Length: 7 hrs and 7 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 145
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 97
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 98

Glen Runciter is dead. Or is everybody else dead? Chip works for Glen Runciter's anti-psi security agency, which hires out its talents to block telepathic and paranormal crimes. But when its special team tackles a big job on the moon, something goes terribly wrong, and Runciter is seemingly killed.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Visionary

  • By Mark on 29-03-13

Visionary

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 29-03-13

Really enjoyed this book. Fabulous descriptive language, larger than life characters. Interesting plot with plenty of twist both expected and unexpected. Great book!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Self Illusion

  • Why There Is No "You" Inside Your Head
  • By: Bruce Hood
  • Narrated by: Bruce Hood
  • Length: 10 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 118
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 83
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 82

The Self Illusion provides a fascinating examination of how the latest science shows that our individual concept of a self is in fact an illusion. Most of us believe that we possess a self - an internal individual who resides inside our bodies, making decisions, authoring actions and possessing free will. The feeling that a single, unified, enduring self inhabits the body is compelling and inescapable. But that sovereignty of the self is increasingly under threat from science as our understanding of the brain advances.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Well written, well read! I enjoyed disagreeing.

  • By Jim Vaughan on 21-01-13

Good argument,

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 29-03-13

This is a good book. The arguments are well presented. Overall some of these arguments take too long and from time to time there was a sense of frustration that the author was not getting to the point. The conclusion is a little shaky because if there is no me inside my head, after reading such a book, there should be an experiential understanding as well as an intellectual one.

2 of 4 people found this review helpful