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Mark Turgid

  • 3
  • reviews
  • 1
  • helpful vote
  • 8
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  • Alan Partridge: Nomad

  • By: Alan Partridge
  • Narrated by: Alan Partridge
  • Length: 6 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,276
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 4,799
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,774

In Alan Partridge: Nomad, Alan dons his boots, windcheater and scarf and embarks on an odyssey through a place he once knew - it's called Britain - intent on completing a journey of immense personal significance. Diarising his ramble in the form of a 'journey journal', Alan details the people and places he encounters, ruminates on matters large and small and, on a final leg fraught with danger, becomes not a man (because he was one to start off with) but a better, more inspiring example of a man.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Every line has a joke.

  • By Dickie Armstrong on 24-10-16

Brilliant

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 27-10-16

It's a different beast to the first book - more of a narrative - but just as good. A genuine snorty laugh every 2 to 3 minutes. So glad Partridge continues.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Cloud Atlas

  • By: David Mitchell
  • Narrated by: Garrick Hagon, Jeff Harding, Steve Hodson, and others
  • Length: 21 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 909
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 781
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 786

Cloud Atlas features six characters in interlocking stories, each interrupting the one before it: a reluctant voyager crossing the Pacific in 1850; a disinherited composer blagging a precarious livelihood in between-the-wars Belgium; a high-minded journalist in Governor Reagan's California; a vanity publisher fleeing his gangland creditors; a genetically modified dinery server on death row; and Zachry, a young Pacific islander witnessing the nightfall of science and civilisation.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great book, brought to life better than any movie

  • By T on 25-02-13

Characterful Production

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-07-16

Firstly I must say I love the novel for many reasons - its perfect pastiches of literary genres, echoing repetitions, memorable scenes and the underlying social commentary; I've re-read it multiple times and it always drags me back - so this review will purely focus on the narrators, who I feel take you through the book very enjoyably. With one exception...

Adam Ewing (Garrick Hagon): As prior reviews have mentioned, this narrator doesn't seem well prepared. Sentences are oddly inflected, words mispronounced, papers can be heard shuffling and a sense of the character doesn't come through. It's a real shame and even worse since he's the first in line and the opening passage of archaic sea journals has put off many readers. See Tim Piggot-Smith's reading in the abridged version for an example of how to do this right.

But then comes Robert Frobisher (David Thorpe): such a rich and layered reading, every sentence is performed beautifully, as it should be; and the raffish, privileged, bipolar musical genius is brought fully to life. And with what heartbreaking results! Some say they want a book read, but this story is all about different viewpoints and so the differences must be felt.

Luisa Rey's narrator (Regina Reagan); smooth, sassy and ideal for this noir thriller told in the third person.

Timothy Cavendish (Steve Hodson): the clackety dentures and tone of pompous derision are wonderfully suited.

Somni-451 (Liza Ross): the robotic Archivist voice aside - they could have used an actor but it works okay and fits in with the genre - this is another measured performance, the frustrated but patient mentor making her point clearly.

Zachry (Jeff Harding): the centrepiece is a fantastic performance; folksy but wise and weathered, you can feel the hard life he's had, picture the dirt in his fingernails and most of all understand easily his pigdin, post-apocalypse future dialect. A masterful achievement.

So hats off to (almost) all concerned and give it a go if you're interested in literature or just fancy an adventure story... that's also comedic and fanciful. I'm more than sure these voices provide the perfect craft for this choppy thoughtful epic journey.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Waiting for Godot

  • By: Samuel Beckett
  • Narrated by: Sean Barrett, David Burke, Terence Rigby, and others
  • Length: 2 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 111
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 76
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 75

There is now no doubt that not only is Waiting for Godot the outstanding play of the 20th century, but it is also Samuel Beckett's masterpiece. Yet it is both a popular text to be studied at school and an enigma. The scene is a country road. There is a solitary tree. It is evening. Two tramp-like figures, Vladimir and Estragon, exchange words. Pull off boots. Munch a root vegetable. Two other curious characters enter. And a boy. Time passes. It is all strange yet familiar.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • In a word, Brilliant

  • By Gryfynn on 21-01-17

Above average performance

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-07-16

Occasionally the main two actors hit the wrong notes but this version was well-produced and would serve as a fine introduction to the text.