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  • 106
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  • The Last Days of August

  • By: Jon Ronson
  • Length: 3 hrs and 43 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 523
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 479
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 477

In December 2017 the famous porn star August Ames committed suicide in a park in the Conejo Valley. It happened a day after she’d been the victim of a Twitter pile-on by fellow porn professionals. A month later, August’s husband Kevin connected with the writer Jon Ronson so they could piece together the story of how Twitter bullying killed his wife. What neither Kevin nor Ronson realised was that Ronson would soon hear rumours and secrets hinting at a very different story - something mysterious and unexpected and terrible.   

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Ronson is the Real Deal!

  • By Simon on 04-01-19

What has happened to Jon?

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 21-01-19

I used to love Jon Ronson's books and shows. There was always something conflicting about Jon as a writer and journalist. On the one hand, he would throw himself into unusual and dangerous situations. On the other, he would be racked with doubt and self examination. Jon was always as much a part of the story as his subjects. And that is what has been missing from his adventures in Pornland. I've heard interviews with Jon after the release of Butterfly Effect in which he would come across as some kind of sycophant to the porn industry..representing those in it as ordinary everyday folk, and one big happy family. I even heard him defending the idea of young people going into the porn industry. But nowhere have I found what Jon thinks? What is his relationship to porn? Why did he start (and stay firmly fixed) in this field? It is the absence of Jon's doubt, criticism, or condemnation of his subjects that marks these two exercises in journalism out as different from his usual style. Jon has become, in every sense of the work, a voyeur. A mute puritan neither critical nor startling. The climax [sic] of this podcast is hollow and unsurprising. The porn industry is full of damaged people, damaging each other, and damaging those who view it. I was hoping for something more. I must admit, Louis Theroux did it better. And at least his Wierd Weekends was funny. This is just depressing.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Chalk Man

  • By: C J Tudor
  • Narrated by: Andrew Scott, Asa Butterfield
  • Length: 8 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,276
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,197
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,195

None of us ever agreed on the exact beginning. Was it when we started drawing the chalk figures, or when they started to appear on their own? Was it the terrible accident? Or when they found the first body?

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Good story, narration not so good

  • By C rimmer on 08-11-18

A good read if a bit familiar

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 14-04-18

I got this audio book because Andrew Scott was the narrator. While I appreciate his nonplussed narration, I must admit that I listen to audible while cycling and moving through traffic, and Scott's voice got lost at times due to its quietness. That aside, the story is engaging if a bit familiar. At times I was reminded of the narrative structure of Stephen King's IT (especially one particular scene) just through a British lens. Overall, entertaining mix of suspense and horror.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Girl on the Train

  • By: Paula Hawkins
  • Narrated by: Louise Brealey, India Fisher, Clare Corbett
  • Length: 10 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 22,627
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 20,366
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 20,366

Rachel catches the same commuter train every morning. She knows it will wait at the same signal each time, overlooking a row of back gardens. She's even started to feel like she knows the people who live in one of the houses. Jess and Jason, she calls them. Their life - as she sees it - is perfect. If only Rachel could be that happy. And then she sees something shocking. It's only a minute until the train moves on, but it's enough. Now everything's changed.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • waste of time

  • By Nicole on 02-10-16

Gripping drama - worth the hype

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 13-02-18

Great read. Forget the nay-sayers who criticize the book for having unsympathetic characters - I found them flawed humans that I could relate to and believe in. And the ending may not be the explosive event that some people may wish for - but it did have an element of the 'how will they get out of that' feel that Dan Brown books have, plus a number of red herrings that keep things interesting. Of all the books in this genre that I've read recently, this one kept me gripped the most. And let's not overlook the great voice performers. Worth the hype.

  • The Hanging Club

  • By: Tony Parsons
  • Narrated by: Colin Mace
  • Length: 8 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,030
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 963
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 964

A band of vigilante executioners roam London's hot summer nights, abducting evil men and hanging them. Sentenced to death is the gang member who abused vulnerable girls, the wealthy drunk driver who mowed down a child and the hate preacher calling for the murder of British troops. As the bodies pile up and riots explode all over the sweltering city, DC Max Wolfe embarks on his most dangerous investigation yet: hunting a gang of killers whom many believe to be heroes....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Very enjoyable

  • By tired & cynical on 12-10-16

Atmospheric crime drama but saw the ending coming.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 31-05-16

Stylistically, I enjoyed the book. I've never read anything by Parsons before but I've been aware of him as a journalist and pundit since I was a kid. I found the picture painted of my native London to be quite accurate and relevant to our current climate. The characters were interestingly constructed, though at times rather one dimensional. My big criticism is that I saw the ' twist' coming a mile away. Entertaining pop-crime novel which reveals a bit of London history.

5 of 8 people found this review helpful

  • Frank

  • The True Story that Inspired the Movie
  • By: Jon Ronson
  • Narrated by: Jon Ronson
  • Length: 1 hr and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 329
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 307
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 307

In the late 1980s Jon Ronson was the keyboard player in the Frank Sidebottom Oh Blimey Big Band. Frank wore a big fake head. Nobody outside his inner circle knew his true identity. This became the subject of feverish speculation during his zenith years. Together, they rode relatively high. Then it all went wrong. Twenty-five years later and Jon has co-written a movie, Frank, inspired by his time in this great and bizarre band. Frank is set for release in 2014, starring Michael Fassbender, Maggie Gyllenhaal, and Domhnall Gleeson and directed by Lenny Abrahamson.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • just lovely

  • By Amazon Customer on 12-06-15

An extended newspaper article.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 28-05-16

In reality, this is more of an extended newspaper article to promote the film. I've even heard some of the exact same audio on podcasts such as This American Life. That said, it is worth the £2 I paid for it. Jon Ronson is an acquired taste in voice, but I'm a big fan of his voice so enjoyed the performance thoroughly.

  • The Girl with All the Gifts

  • By: M. R. Carey
  • Narrated by: Finty Williams
  • Length: 13 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,551
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,107
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,087

Melanie is a very special girl. Dr Caldwell calls her 'our little genius'. Every morning, Melanie waits in her cell to be collected for class. When they come for her, Sergeant keeps his gun pointing at her while two of his people strap her into the wheelchair. She thinks they don't like her. She jokes that she won't bite, but they don't laugh. Melanie loves school. She loves learning about spelling and sums and the world outside the classroom and the children's cells.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A stunning read

  • By Simon on 19-01-14

The zombie story gets a new twist.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-05-16

A stands out novel needs to cover familiar ground while also injecting something new into the genre. The Girl With The Gifts manages to balance these elements well. This book is far from genre defining but it is well written and paced which, despite the cross country road trip, retains that claustrophobic air of a zombie movie. The characters are believable, though at times the dialogue does seem a bit stilted. Overall, a good entertaining addition to the post apocalyptic zombie genre. Recommended.

  • The Handmaid's Tale

  • By: Margaret Atwood
  • Narrated by: Joanna David
  • Length: 10 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,178
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,727
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,733

The Republic of Gilead offers Offred only one function: to breed . If she deviates, she will, like dissenters, be hanged at the wall or sent out to die slowly of radiation sickness. But even a repressive state cannot obliterate desire - neither Offred's nor that of the two men on which her future hangs....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A favourite

  • By Raison on 10-11-13

I wish I'd read it sooner.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 20-03-16

My only regret is that I took so long before reading this title. I have read many of MA's books, but I can see why this is regarded as a classic.
As always MA manages to be spot on with her insights into human hubris and desire framed in her familiar futuristic dystopias that feel only too plausible to be comfortable. I particularly like the epitaph that managed to put both the narrator and the reader in their place. Fantastic novel.

  • The Shadow of the Wind

  • By: Carlos Ruiz Zafon
  • Narrated by: Daniel Philpott
  • Length: 17 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 685
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 564
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 562

Hidden in the heart of the old city of Barcelona is the 'cemetery of lost books', a labyrinthine library of obscure and forgotten titles that have long gone out of print. To this library, a man brings his 10-year-old son Daniel one cold morning in 1945. Daniel is allowed to choose one book from the shelves and pulls out 'La Sombra del Viento' by Julian Carax. But as he grows up, several people seem inordinately interested in his find.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Awesome

  • By MRS LESLEY J E MACLEAN on 23-12-12

Gripping tale that keep put me up at night.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-01-16

I was advised to read this book by a friend, and I'm glad I took his advice. Gripping story with intertwining plots that all reach a crescendo at the end. Very well read too.

  • The King's Deception

  • By: Steve Berry
  • Narrated by: Scott Brick
  • Length: 13 hrs and 25 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 40
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 36
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 36

There is a secret from our history - 500 years old - startling in its revelations and devastating in its political impact. A secret that has, thankfully, stayed hidden. Until now. Former Justice Department agent Cotton Malone travels to England and finds himself caught in a dark conspiracy born long ago, in the time of the Tudors. Now both the CIA and MI6 seem to be competing to uncover the mystery, and for Malone, supposedly on holiday with his son, Gary, it's not just the action which comes thick and fast.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Another fantastic Malone adventure....

  • By Salter on 05-09-15

One of the better Malone stories.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 13-11-15

This was definitely one of the better stories in the Malone series. The story unfolds at a good pace and all the clues aren't given away in the first few chapters, as Steve Berry has a tendency to do. The back story to this fiction is interesting too. I'm British and I didn't know about the Queen Elizabeth folk tales. Well worth the read.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Girl in the Spider's Web

  • Continuing Stieg Larsson's Dragon Tattoo Series, Book 4
  • By: David Lagercrantz, George Goulding - translator
  • Narrated by: Saul Reichlin
  • Length: 16 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 3,426
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 3,190
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 3,194

Mikael Blomkvist is contacted by renowned scientist Professor Balder. Fearing for his life, but more concerned for his son's well-being, Balder wants Millennium to publish his story. More interesting to Blomkvist than Balder's advances in Artificial Intelligence, is his connection with a certain female superhacker. It seems that Lisbeth Salander, like Balder, is a target of ruthless cyber gangsters that will soon bring terror to the streets of Stockholm, the Millennium team....

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Sorry, terrible!

  • By DKHerts on 14-11-18

Not bad, but not a classic.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-09-15

It would be hard to surpass the original millenium books, so it should be no surprise that The Girl in The Spider's Web is not the classic that the other books were. The plot attempts the complexities of the first book but doesn't quite enthrall like the first, and, at times, the cliches show their ugly faces. However, despite the lukewarm nature of the fourth chapter in the series, I'm glad to see these two dysfunctional detectives back in print, even if the original author sadly could not be the one to pen it.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful