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John

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So important I’m going to re-read parts

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 23-04-20

Not only does this book touch a nerve the ideas around social norms and experiencing discrimination are hard to deal with because they are true- like a stone in our shoe. When we experience this stone can we welcome it, allowing the unexpected guest to teach us something? How do we experience this thought in our own body - where do we feel it? Can we turn towards the place of discomfort with mindful compassion breathing in and out that part of our body and noticing what happens? Maybe we’re experiencing less than 1/1000th the pain someone dealing every day with this discrimination is experiencing. What does this show us about our own therapeutic window? Can we use this insight to help us relate better to someone who is going through trauma reliving it day in day out?We begin to see just being mindfully with the pain - the first arrow - can be too much because the pain is so great. It’s the skilful teaching about how to bring compassionate wisdom to that: so important. Long meditations for trauma victims can be too much. This book raised an important question and begins to show a way through. There are other mindfulness audiobooks notably Tara Brach’s work with RAIN meditation in Radical Self Acceptance that are also helpful.

1 person found this helpful

Let down by endorsement of Tantra

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-04-20

I am profoundly disturbed by the references to Tantra in this audiobook especially mention of eating human feces and urine as “ambrosia”, this in the context of when the Dalai Lama states sometimes being okay for a Monk to have sex with a “consort”. On researching this Tantric teaching I discovered such Buddhist “consorts” have at times be non-consensual sexual partners, which is horrific: one can only imagine the social pressures brought to bear in a Buddhist developing country and even in the West in context of vulnerable people drawn into a religious setting, which the Dalai Lama has indeed been slow to condemn: pressure both on the “consort” and perhaps also the initiate, who has now gone too far in agreeing to undergo such a Tantric ceremony and does not wish to lose face by refusing to participate once they understand what is at stake since they are by means of the ceremony in a position of complete obedience to their Lama. Such Tantra is in shocking opposition to the advice to respect all beings - but such contradictions should not come as a surprise in the context of Tantra which may involve learning acceptance of otherwise shocking experiences as a way of teaching. The Dalai Lama’s endorsement of Tantra profoundly undermines this book’s other more ethical advice and actually raised questions about his personal integrity. It’s eye-opening once you understand the implications of what he is saying.

Very persuasive

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 17-12-19

My GP recommended The Fast Diet some years ago and I bought a paperback when it was sold under the 5:2 title. I found it hard to sleep on the nights after fasting. However I like the research on PubMed that really backs up the health benefits of this diet. You need to keep going with a day a week (6:1) at the end of your diet. It was not so clear to do this in the old book. I put the weight back on. This audiobook is well read and highly persuasive. I’m starting again- right before Christmas- as that’s a high risk time to gain weight and I can fit the plan in around the week and still have a normal family Christmas. This time I have an idea from this audiobook to try fasting starting in the evening so I eat a tiny meal one evening, a breakfast of porridge and skim milk, keep going with black coffee (decaffeinated) through the day and eat a normal supper that night. This’ll work a lot better. I won’t be hyper alert any given night. And I know the weight comes off.

Moves as fast as James Bond - but it’s for real

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-11-19

I couldn’t stop listening to this audiobook. Moves as fast as James Bond across UK, USA, Africa, Caribbean and Russia - but this is for real. Don’t wait to check it out.

Don't buy this book

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 14-07-19

I bought this mistakenly thinking it will give me an insight into lucid dreaming. I am incredibly disappointed, I got no insight into this at all. Writing down dreams after we wake up and recollecting them can give an insight into what we have been dreaming about but not enable us to develop lucid dreaming (where we may be able to recognise and even alter the actual outcome of our dream, during the dream). This book is a pop-psychology work about the unconscious (as a psychoanalyst might refer to this aspect of ourselves) but Charlie Morley is encouraging us to explore this profound aspect of self in a superficial way. Simply with the aid of his book, without a qualified professional to unearth and discuss the disturbing aspects of ourself that we may begin to touch on through insights provided by our dreams. This is like sending the reader or listener up a dangerous mountain alone, with a map but with no experienced guide - just a book on mountaneering.

2 people found this helpful

A kaleidoscope of sounds memories and people

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-06-18

This isn’t a fast moving book and the story is loosely related. But it’s a bit like a curry. Keep eating and you will enjoy the wonderful descriptions of Calcutta and its teeming humanity.

Fascinating and very impressive

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-03-18

This book should be required reading for doctors, educators, business CEOs and political parties everywhere. It’s also the best self help book you can read this year if you want to learn more, lose weight, increase your life expectancy, cut the lifetime risk of serious disorders like diabetes, Alzheimer’s and even cancer and become more efficient at work and enjoy your downtime better. The evidence presented is impressive and the narration is polished and professional

Utter rubbish

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-02-18

What would have made Ayahuasca: Soul Medicine of the Amazon Jungle better?

I'm so disappointed in this audiobook - the author is very confused and talks boringly. Don't bother buying it.

Has Ayahuasca: Soul Medicine of the Amazon Jungle put you off other books in this genre?

No

Would you be willing to try another one of Javier Regueiro’s performances?

No

If you could play editor, what scene or scenes would you have cut from Ayahuasca: Soul Medicine of the Amazon Jungle?

All of it

Any additional comments?

Instead read "Five weeks in the Amazon" by Sean Michael Hayes, it's a really good book (at least the Kindle version) Sean is open and honest.

A real gem

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-01-18

Don’t be put off by Eva Delectorskaya’s rather contrived name - yes she does share her surname with (in real life) Russian model and emigré Lydia who collaborated with Henri Matisse rather than Britain’s secret service and throughout the book I couldn’t help but wonder if that seductive choice was somehow no literary accident. The book is beautifully read far better than the average spy story.

Rushdie sends up NYC

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 18-09-17

If you could sum up The Golden House in three words, what would they be?

No going back

What other book might you compare The Golden House to, and why?

Compared to Midnight's Children this book lacks bite. One senses the author isn't drawn to New York - he hasn't really settled but lives out his time there. And so with the Golden family. Rushdie plays games with the reader, slowly building the personal architecture of the Golden household in satirical manner, then deliberately shocking.

Have you listened to any of Vikas Adams’s other performances? How does this one compare?

Vikas Adams could not be bettered

Did you have an emotional reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

Anodyne. His writing has become like white jazz, intellectual, emotionally flippant/disengaged to avoid the pain of looking too closely.

1 person found this helpful