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  • 16
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  • 46
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  • The Epic City

  • The World on the Streets of Calcutta
  • By: Kushanava Choudhury
  • Narrated by: Homer Todiwala
  • Length: 8 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 6
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 6

Everything that could possibly be wrong with a city was wrong with Calcutta. When Kushanava Choudhury arrived in New Jersey at the age of 12, he had already migrated halfway around the world four times. After graduating from Princeton, he moved back to the world which his immigrant parents had abandoned, to a city built between a river and a swamp, where the moisture-drenched air swarms with mosquitos after sundown.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Calcutta: heaving with humanity and history

  • By Rachel Redford on 24-08-17

A kaleidoscope of sounds memories and people

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-06-18

This isn’t a fast moving book and the story is loosely related. But it’s a bit like a curry. Keep eating and you will enjoy the wonderful descriptions of Calcutta and its teeming humanity.

  • Why We Sleep

  • The New Science of Sleep and Dreams
  • By: Matthew Walker
  • Narrated by: John Sackville
  • Length: 13 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 1,814
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1,591
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 1,554

Why can some birds sleep with only half of their brain? What really happens during REM sleep? Why do our sleep patterns change across a lifetime? Sleep is one of the most important but least understood aspects of our life, health and longevity. Until very recently, science had no answer to the question of why we sleep or what good it serves or why we suffer such devastating health consequences when it is absent. In this book, neuroscientist and sleep expert Matthew Walker charts 20 years of cutting-edge research.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Is Sleep just for the Weak?

  • By R Blades on 15-01-18

Fascinating and very impressive

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-03-18

This book should be required reading for doctors, educators, business CEOs and political parties everywhere. It’s also the best self help book you can read this year if you want to learn more, lose weight, increase your life expectancy, cut the lifetime risk of serious disorders like diabetes, Alzheimer’s and even cancer and become more efficient at work and enjoy your downtime better. The evidence presented is impressive and the narration is polished and professional

  • Ayahuasca: Soul Medicine of the Amazon Jungle

  • By: Javier Regueiro
  • Narrated by: Javier Regueiro
  • Length: 6 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 8
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7

Javier Regueiro not only provides general information about ayahuasca, but he bridges the cultural gap between the native and the current use of ayahuasca by Westerners. This guide offers background about the plant medicine, its history, and how to engage with and learn through its use. It includes stories of Javier's personal experience of transformation as well as stories from those he's guided in ceremonies.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent

  • By SJRod on 28-12-17

Utter rubbish

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-02-18

What would have made Ayahuasca: Soul Medicine of the Amazon Jungle better?

I'm so disappointed in this audiobook - the author is very confused and talks boringly. Don't bother buying it.

Has Ayahuasca: Soul Medicine of the Amazon Jungle put you off other books in this genre?

No

Would you be willing to try another one of Javier Regueiro’s performances?

No

If you could play editor, what scene or scenes would you have cut from Ayahuasca: Soul Medicine of the Amazon Jungle?

All of it

Any additional comments?

Instead read "Five weeks in the Amazon" by Sean Michael Hayes, it's a really good book (at least the Kindle version) Sean is open and honest.

0 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Restless

  • By: William Boyd
  • Narrated by: Rosamund Pike
  • Length: 10 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,369
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 925
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 919

Shortlisted for the British Book Awards, Richard and Judy Best Read, 2007.
Winner of the Costa Book Awards, Novel of the Year, 2006.
A Richard and Judy Book Club selection.
Longlisted for the Audiobook Download of the Year, 2007.

What happens when everything you thought you knew about your mother turns out to be an elaborate lie? During the summer of 1976, Ruth Gilmartin discovers that her very English mother, Sally, is really Eva Delectorskaya, a Russian émigrée and one-time spy.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A gripping and thoughtful book

  • By Tom on 03-11-07

A real gem

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-01-18

Don’t be put off by Eva Delectorskaya’s rather contrived name - yes she does share her surname with (in real life) Russian model and emigré Lydia who collaborated with Henri Matisse rather than Britain’s secret service and throughout the book I couldn’t help but wonder if that seductive choice was somehow no literary accident. The book is beautifully read far better than the average spy story.

  • The Golden House

  • By: Salman Rushdie
  • Narrated by: Vikas Adams
  • Length: 14 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 58
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 55
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 53

When powerful real estate tycoon Nero Golden moves to the States under mysterious circumstances, he and his three adult children assume new identities, taking Roman names, and move into a grand mansion in downtown Manhattan. Invoking literature, pop culture, and the cinema, Salman Rushdie spins the story of the American zeitgeist over the last eight years, hitting every beat. In a new world order of alternative truths, Rushdie has written the ultimate novel about identity, truth, terror and lies.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Where imagination meets reality...

  • By James_Rock on 24-09-17

Rushdie sends up NYC

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 18-09-17

If you could sum up The Golden House in three words, what would they be?

No going back

What other book might you compare The Golden House to, and why?

Compared to Midnight's Children this book lacks bite. One senses the author isn't drawn to New York - he hasn't really settled but lives out his time there. And so with the Golden family. Rushdie plays games with the reader, slowly building the personal architecture of the Golden household in satirical manner, then deliberately shocking.

Have you listened to any of Vikas Adams’s other performances? How does this one compare?

Vikas Adams could not be bettered

Did you have an emotional reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

Anodyne. His writing has become like white jazz, intellectual, emotionally flippant/disengaged to avoid the pain of looking too closely.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Agatha Raisin: Dishing the Dirt

  • Agatha Raisin Series, Book 26
  • By: M. C. Beaton
  • Narrated by: Penelope Keith
  • Length: 6 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 491
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 443
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 443

A therapist moved into the village of Carsely, and Agatha Raisin hated her. Not only was this therapist, Jill Davent, romancing Agatha's ex-husband, but she had dug up details of Agatha's slum background. Added to that, Jill was counselling a woman called Gwen Simple from Winter Parva, and Agatha firmly believed Gwen to have assisted her son in some grisly murders, although has no proof she had done so.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great Fun!!

  • By Winsome Gillette-Fussell on 11-02-16

A huge disappointment

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-04-17

What could have made this a 4 or 5-star listening experience for you?

If only this had been as good as her first book

What could M. C. Beaton have done to make this a more enjoyable book for you?

I really enjoyed the original Agatha Raisin and the Quiche of Death. That was light reading and rather endearing, a great send-up of village life in the Chilterns. I hoped this book would follow in the same vein. Instead it reads like a worn-out horse that can scarcely take another step. An appalling novel, characters so thin you can see through them.

What three words best describe Penelope Keith’s voice?

Posh but fun

What character would you cut from Agatha Raisin: Dishing the Dirt?

All of them

Any additional comments?

The arrival of a psychotherapist offers many delightfully embarrassing Freudian possibilities to the occupants of an English village but nothing is made of it. Instead she is disposed of much too early in the plot.

0 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Cartes Postales from Greece

  • By: Victoria Hislop
  • Narrated by: Dan Stevens, Victoria Hislop, Esther Wane, and others
  • Length: 8 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 216
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 199
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 198

Week after week the postcards arrive, addressed to a name Ellie does not know, with no return address, each signed with an initial: A. With their bright skies, blue seas and alluring images of Greece, these cartes postales brighten her life. After six months, to her disappointment, they cease. But the montage she has created on the wall of her flat has cast a spell. She must see this country for herself.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Wonderful - dig out your passport!

  • By Helen on 17-05-17

Wonderful holiday reading

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 14-11-16

I love the narration: the postcards come to life and the events stay with me

  • The Name of the Rose

  • By: Umberto Eco
  • Narrated by: Sean Barrett
  • Length: 21 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 583
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 553
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 554

This hugely engaging story of murder, superstition, religious politics and drama in a medieval monastery was one of the most striking novels to appear in the 1980s. The Name of the Rose is a thrilling story enriched with period detail and laced with tongue-in-cheek allusions to fictional characters, the most striking of which is the Franciscan friar William of Baskerville, who displays many characteristics of Sherlock Holmes.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Sean Barrett does justice to this wonderful text.

  • By Booklover on 12-01-15

Beautifully narration

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 25-10-16

As slow paced as the monastic era in which it was set, this is a hugely enjoyable holiday read.

  • The Churchill Factor

  • How One Man Made History
  • By: Boris Johnson
  • Narrated by: Simon Shepherd
  • Length: 11 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,233
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,103
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,101

The point of The Churchill Factor is that one man can make all the difference. On the eve of the 50th anniversary of Winston Churchill's death, Boris Johnson explores what makes up the 'Churchill Factor' - the singular brilliance of one of the most important leaders of the 20th century.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Blood, toil, tears and sweat...

  • By FictionFan on 19-11-14

Brought history to life

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-04-16

This book is wonderful- it brings British history to life through the actions of one man: Churchill. Boris Johnson makes it all so vivid. It was tough for me that he confuses British with English at various points throughout the book as my uncles and Father - all Scots - risked their lives and died for Britain in the war despite not being English. That's the only inaccuracy in this book. I cannot believe Churchill would have made this mistake. He was a man who understood Britain to the core.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Remains of the Day

  • By: Kazuo Ishiguro
  • Narrated by: Dominic West
  • Length: 7 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,348
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,244
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,240

A contemporary classic, The Remains of the Day is Kazuo Ishiguro's beautiful and haunting evocation of life between the wars in a Great English House. In the summer of 1956, Stevens, the ageing butler of Darlington Hall, embarks on a leisurely holiday that will take him deep into the countryside – and into his past.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • heartbreaking

  • By Emily Essex on 14-05-16

Beautifully read

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-03-16

This is a wonderful book greatly enhanced by the narrator- my only wish is that he pronounced valet in the British rather than American manner. I couldn't help reflecting on the true greatness of our rather understated culture and how much this great nation owes to the contributions of seemingly ordinary people who achieved great success without ever appearing in the limelight.