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  • Christ the Way, the Truth, the Life

  • Book 20
  • By: William Kelly
  • Narrated by: Alex Wyndham
  • Length: 1 hr
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 2
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2

In Christ the Way, the Truth, the Life (John 14:6), William Kelly clearly brings out the Gospel message and the centrality of Christ in all things. The Lord Jesus Christ said, "I am the Way, the Truth and the Life, no man cometh unto the Father, but by me".

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • The Raven

  • By J on 05-08-18

The Raven

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-08-18


No soul needs to end up trapped under the shadow of the raven as in The Raven (Edgar Allen Poe). As in:

‘Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary,
Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore—

Ah, distinctly I remember it was in the bleak December;
And each separate dying ember wrought its ghost upon the floor.

Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there wondering, fearing,
Doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before;

Open here I flung the shutter, when, with many a flirt and flutter,
In there stepped a stately Raven of the saintly days of yore;

Not the least obeisance made he; not a minute stopped or stayed he;
But, with mien of lord or lady, perched above my chamber door—

Perched upon a bust of Pallas just above my chamber door—
            Perched, and sat, and nothing more.’

Why not? Well, because the writer implores this question:

—‘tell me truly, I implore—
Is there—is there balm in Gilead?—tell me—tell me, I implore!"’

The answer to this is ‘Yes’.
            
Today it can be understood the Raven’s answer is actually apt to the question that follows:

‘But the Raven, sitting lonely on the placid bust, spoke only
That one word, as if his soul in that one word he did outpour.

Nothing farther then he uttered—not a feather then he fluttered—
Till I scarcely more than muttered "Other friends have flown before—

On the morrow he will leave me, as my Hopes have flown before."
            Then the bird said "Nevermore”.’

Nevermore need our hopes leave us.
Hope in the balm from Gilead is still with us. Both Elijah’s and a 21st century firm scientific proof of God’s existence are with us.

  • The Garden of the Gods

  • By: Gerald Durrell
  • Narrated by: Christopher Timothy
  • Length: 6 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 72
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 54
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 53

The enchanted island of Corfu was home to Gerald Durrell and his family for five years before the Second World War. For the passionate young zoologist, Corfu was a natural paradise, teeming with strange birds and beasts that he could collect watch and care for. But life was not without its problems - Gerald’s family often objected to his animal-collecting activities, especially when the beasts wound up in the family’s villa or even worse - the fridge.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • This is a great book.

  • By L on 24-12-12

If you would like to read something ‘delightful’ this is the book.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 27-11-16

One can come back to listening to this book, read in this way, time and again.

(It is certainly possible to be tired of London, but it can more surely be said that if one is tired of listening to this, ‘one is tired of life’..)

; )

  • Short Writings, Volume 1

  • Book 19
  • By: Hamilton Smith, F.S Marsh, Watler Scott
  • Narrated by: Alex Wyndham
  • Length: 1 hr and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 2
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2

We need every scripture for conviction, correction, and instruction; but the scriptures that present "the things concerning himself" must have a special charm for the Christian. It is this that makes Psalm 16 so attractive, for it sets forth the moral perfections of Christ, the perfect man, as he trod the path of life through this world of sin and death.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Faithfulness and fragrance

  • By J on 31-10-16

Faithfulness and fragrance

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 31-10-16

It is true that to some, speaking the truth to them is the fragrance of life, and to others, it seems like death (in terms of realising the necessity of dying to self, when they have no intention of doing so).

It has to be noted, though, that a foreign agent may pretend to be someone of one's own country, but may later be shown not to be, but to be only posing as one, while having a foreign agenda.

Double agents are more like those who 'promise you freedom, while they themselves are slaves, for a man is a slave to whatever has mastered him'. They seem to offer a way out, or secret knowledge, but their motives are the same, a harmful and foreign agenda of their own. So it is generally.

  • Jehoshaphat

  • Worldliness, Book 17
  • By: C. H. Mackintosh
  • Narrated by: Alex Wyndham
  • Length: 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 2
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2

Jehoshaphat: Worldliness looks at the life of this Old Testament king of Judah and encourages us to examine ourselves in the light of his mistakes. When a Christian enters into connection with the world, he lays himself open to be "persuaded" by the world - to enter upon an unchristian course of action.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Worldliness and popularity..

  • By J on 30-10-16

Worldliness and popularity..

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 30-10-16

If only it were better understood that worldliness in this context includes the problem of people seeking to please 'the world' in telling others what their "ears want to hear" rather than the actual truth.

Aescetism in itself in not the answer, as we are assured in scripture, but we have been told things for too long, even by 'science' that make out as if we 'decide the terms' of how we are to see the creation, and all our relations to it, and to all others, when we simply do not.

Even the term 'childish wonder' is confused for us by others speaking of 'science'.

Being childish includes qualities of ignorance and arrogance, (eg reductionist thinking and over-simplifications) whereas childlike wonder is the quality, as we have been told, that we should strive to keep, including humility, as it does.

It is in these critical things that we stand or fall. Thinking carefully for oneself is so important, as we will each still have to give account for ourselves, each of us, alone.

  • Job's Three Questions and Their Answers

  • Book 16
  • By: H .L. Rossier
  • Narrated by: Alex Wyndham
  • Length: 36 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 2
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2

In the book of Job we find the highest and deepest questions and some of them elucidated in a way that far exceeds any other revelations in the Old Testament. It is marvelous to see this book's all-important questions. In them questions of forgiveness - and of the mysterious ways of God - are satisfactorily answered.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A foreshadowing

  • By J on 17-10-16

A foreshadowing

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 17-10-16

It is interesting that Job was confident and 'yearned' to actually one day see, and that we are to have the same confidence today. It must have been 'pretty cool' then to hear live, in real-time, "Today this has been fulfilled in your hearing."

  • Elijah

  • Brethren Writers Library Book 11
  • By: Hamilton Smith
  • Narrated by: Alex Wyndham
  • Length: 2 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 3
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 3
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 3

In Elijah, Hamilton Smith traces the major events of the life of Elijah, the Prophet of God, with all the highs and lows in his work as a prophet. Elijah knew only too well the inadequacies of his own humanity - he was a man who was "subject to like passions as we are". But Elijah knew the living God, was conscious of His presence, and was aware that prayer brought him into contact with the greatest power in the universe.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Really, very helpful

  • By J on 05-10-16

Really, very helpful

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-10-16

Apart from the encouragement of remembering these times of Elijah's life, and that we really do need to learn and never forget these spiritual truths and lessons in life, and can grow from hardships that are then not wasted, another aspect of this I can say I know. That is that it is not only possible to ask for a double portion of Elijah's spirit, as Elisha did, but to then even be able to convey what Elijah did in the burning up of his sacrifice, and to have that outcome, that he did. ('Whether they listen or fail to listen'..)

  • The Boy in the Mirror

  • By: Tom Preston
  • Narrated by: Alex Wyndham
  • Length: 2 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 4
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 4

In January 2011, aged 21, Tom Preston was diagnosed with stage four advanced aggressive lymphoma. His chances of survival were optimistically placed at around 40 percent. This short, autobiographical work tells the story of the fight in the months that followed - but this is no ordinary cancer memoir.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A MAMOTH JOURNEY..

  • By Jinty on 09-12-16

A very well-written and honest account, that must inspire efforts in treating and finding cures for cancer.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-09-16

It is right that the book is written, as it is, in the second person, cancer being a condition that could affect anyone. It is also right that it is written in a way, and comes across in a way, that avoids many mistakes that could be made in such an account- without varnish or excessive self-focus. Researchers in the field would do well to hear it, giving, as it does, a personal account of having to go through treatments that are often seen as dry or theoretical facts from the researchers' side. One thing that could be disagreed with, is that cancer 'belongs' to the patient. 'Your' cancer it is not- considering that cancer cells have broken out of following the carefully-patterned rules of the cell, and are rogue cells- disobedient, malignant, invasive and destructive in their very essence. They no longer 'respect' other cells, or are of the same makeup any longer. The tension is well maintained in the account, to the end.