LISTENER

Amazon Customer

  • 5
  • reviews
  • 3
  • helpful votes
  • 5
  • ratings
  • Get Happy: Introduction to Happiness

  • By: Michelle Gielan, Oliver Burkeman
  • Length: 1 hr and 52 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 7
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 7

In this five-part series, US happiness expert and positive psychologist Michelle Gielan and British journalist and author Oliver Burkeman explore ways to become truly happier, backed up by scientific evidence. Bringing their own unique and counter-balanced personalities to proceedings they ask questions such as: what is happiness? Can we make ourselves happier? And why is everyone talking about mindfulness? Michelle and Oliver tackle these questions with the help of some of the world’s leading experts on the subjects and at the end of each episode, Michelle leads the listener through a quick and easy practical exercise that has been shown to increase happiness. Listeners will be left with a genuine takeaway from each episode and encouraged to explore the topics further and take their own steps towards a happier life.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great overview

  • By Pavol P. on 23-11-18

Useful tips

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 24-11-18

Each episode contained a practical tip to help you become happier in life. I find these tips useful , though the "doubler" sounded very similar to recording gratitude and sounded like the narrators pet invention rather than another proven technique.

I found the American narrator's husband told me more depressing information than information that made me happy. I had to turn it off when he came on talking about suicide as I was listening with my children. I also found guests being introduced as "the best selling author of" a bit irritating as it seemed to be be suggesting that this made them an expert in the field. I've read enough poor books that sold well to know that isn't the case.
In summary, I found the tips useful, but the actual content was quite light.

  • It Takes Guts: Introduction to Gut Health

  • By: Tim Anderson, Giles Yeo
  • Length: 2 hrs and 15 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 16
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 14

MasterChef winner and restaurateur Tim Anderson, with the help of Dr Giles Yeo, ventures into his bowels. "Gut Feeling", "the Gut Instinct", "Trust your Gut". We have so many phrases to talk about the gut, but now science is developing a new language to describe what is really happening down there. Tim and Giles find out how the gut can revolutionize the way we feel in body and mind.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Really interesting intro to git health

  • By Michael on 01-12-18

Lacking in practicality

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 24-11-18

Enjoyable enough, but could have done with more practical tips and information that I could act upon than it did. As it was, I didn't learn much new and didn't really learn anything that I could take away with me.
Needed to be a little less fascinated my fermented foods and poo and which seemed to have much more coverage than they deserved. Not really sure either was much of an expert in the field either.

1 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Lost Connections

  • Uncovering the Real Causes of Depression - and the Unexpected Solutions
  • By: Johann Hari
  • Narrated by: Johann Hari
  • Length: 9 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 824
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 758
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 749

From the New York Times best-selling author of Chasing the Scream, a radically new way of thinking about depression and anxiety. What really causes depression and anxiety - and how can we really solve them?

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • One mans story

  • By Andy T on 04-10-18

Let down by a very poor last third

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 16-10-18

I bought this on the recent Audible Deal and thought that it might help with my anxiety and depression.

I enjoyed Part 1 (why anti depressants shouldn't be given as much as they are and don't actually appear to have benefits for most people, but do have side effects) and Part 2 (what are the causes of depression if its not a chemical imbalance and what can we do that might work better). Both parts had scientific research and experts quoted. However, Part 3 (lost connections?) was a pretty rambling, unfocused waffle which went on at great length about a German housing group's issues and other tales (like using psychedelics) which had little - if any - scientific backing for the conclusions he came to. He would tend to have someone say "this could be of benefit" and run with that as though it was the greatest cure even though it was one person's opinion on (usually) one and only one example, the efficacy of which was frequently subjective. By the end of Part 3, I was fed up of listening to Johann and could understand a previous comment about him having a leftist agenda as it felt to me that this part was using very sketchy at best evidence to support his beliefs and world view.

Pros:
Part 1 provided interesting information as to how drug companies have manipulated trial information and the system to get their drugs on the market when they show little benefit but have been shown to cause harm. I found this enlightening.

Part 2 provided a good list of possible social and environmental causes and what you can do to improve your symptoms. I think I will listen to this again.

Part 2 had a lot of direct references by the people he'd interviewed and a lot of facts and figures (as did part 1)
Parts 1 & 2 had a lot of quoted scientific evidence

Cons:
Narrator: Johann Hari shouldn't have narrated this himself. He's not a professional and it shows. At times he was poor and by the end I was sick of his melancholy voice.

Swearing. There wasn't a lot, but why was it needed at all? It might be quoting someone, but it was jarring and really put me off.

Mealtimes: I don't want to know what Johann was eating when he was interviewing someone. Might be his "chummy" writing style but I really don't care about it and it's not why I got the book. He was always saying what he was eating.

Overly Personalised: Some elements (most of Part 3 was guilty of this) were much too personalised and his own journey with AD's coloured his perception too much and biased his opinions too clearly. For instance, there are many side effects to AD's, but he focused on weight gain as it was the major one for him. Not a mention of suicidal or angry mood swings for instance which are much more devastating. I also read this book with no idea who the author was. Part way through Part 3 I was asking myself "what has any of this stuff about a gay bar have to do with depression?" and later wondered what the tale about the guy who wanted gay marriage had to do with it. I now know that he is gay and I guess that's why he felt I needed to know what the gay bar owner's other clubs were called in a book on depression.

CBT: In part 3 in just one sentence he dismisses CBT saying "there isn't any evidence that it is of benefit to people with depression" (or words to that effect), which a very quick and cursory Google shows is utter nonsense. If that was the case, then why does the NHS advocate it? I've just spent a month studying the efficacy of CBT and I know his flippant claim to be untrue and it makes me concerned about the rest of his claims.

Metaphors: At times the metaphors he used made me cringe.

Bookending: The first chapter struck me as irrelevant and I wondered why it was included. I found out at the end of the book it was so he could refer back to a single line in that chapter (listen to your body and don't mask it) at the end. It felt contrived... like too much of the book.

In summary, had I stopped reading the book at the end of part 2, then I would have rated it much higher. Part 3 seemed to be a waste of my life and a fairly desperate attempt to make the points he wanted despite the lack of compelling evidence for his views.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Ep. 1: What Happens in Vegas (Dom Joly's Big American Vacation)

  • By: Dom Joly
  • Length: 22 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 16
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 13
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 13

Dom sets off on his tour around the US of A, with his trusty sidekick (and complete stranger) Fiona. After the first evening consisting primarily of 'ass juice', a visit to 'Hangover Heaven' is a necessity. Followed by a drive-thru wedding complete with a wigged up 'Emergency Elvis'. Not wigs! Dom has a thing about wigs. Anyway, what if the bride and groom are related? Surely you can't get married if you already have a wife?! So many questions....

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Just bad

  • By Mike Luard on 23-04-18

Very funny

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-08-18

Loved this and wish it had been longer or even better had been on TV. Fionna and Dom were very good company and the whole premise was great. I'll listen again.

Only downside (aside from being shorter than I'd like as I loved it so much) was that at times I couldn't make or what the other people were saying.

Recommended. Some swearing so it's not family friendly.

  • Ep. 2: Natural History (The Ricky Gervais Guide To...)

  • By: Ricky Gervais, Stephen Merchant, Karl Pilkington
  • Length: 46 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 33
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 27
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 27

Areas of discussion include: The heuristic potential of flora and fauna; Karl is impressed by a new motoring accessory; Seashores to semiconductors; Gene genius; Monkey thumping; Karl's instinct for extinction; Self-improvement a la Frankenstein; Dodos - a dead delicacy?; Aurally challenged alligators, hedonistic rodents and horse-biting ranidae; Genital aesthetics - Karl talks bollocks.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Ruined by Ricky

  • By Amazon Customer on 11-08-18

Ruined by Ricky

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-08-18

Karl is funny and at times had me laughing out loud, but Ricky and his awful laughing, abundant swearing and hus puerile fascination with sexual organs ruined it for me.

Would have been much better without him on top be honest. He came across as a pillock who was trying too hard to make Karl look stupid. Why he wouldn't just shut up and stop being over the top I don't know. I'd forgotten just how irritating the guy can be.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful