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ChloetheMum

United Kingdom
  • 9
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  • 212
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  • 10
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Ok if you can get past the narrator

Overall
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 13-04-13

Although when I listened to the sample reading before purchasing this, I thought I'd get along with it, when I tried to listen to it for more than a few minutes I found myself mildly irritated. I think it was to do with the author's dedication at the beginning to his wife; all a bit over the top and I started thinking about that film 'Meet the Fockers.' Although the message is to just do one thing a day to develop your 'Buddha Brain', it seemed a bit like he wants a commitment that you WILL do this every day. A bit too much like hard work . . .

1 of 6 people found this review helpful

Gentle, very easy listening

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 13-04-13

Mark Williams has a very nice voice, easy to listen to. He narrates in a nice, down to earth way, and you find yourself being drawn along. The book itself has some serious messages and practices, but they sound friendly and do-able when Mr Williams describes them. I actually began to feel better after the first hour of listening, it's very comforting and reassuring. The practices are very simpIe and easy to incorporate into your everyday thinking. I can certainly recommend this for those of us who have had a bit of an emotional battering . . .

15 of 19 people found this review helpful

Learn to Meditate - Metta Bhavana cover art
  • Learn to Meditate - Metta Bhavana
  • Two Easy-to-Follow Guided Meditations
  • By: Rae Roberts
  • Narrated by: Rae Roberts

Very effective and simple to do

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-04-13

I was a bit sceptical about this, I haven't done meditation before. I thought maybe it was going to be a bit mumbo jumbo, but it wasn't at all. Perfectly straight forward, simple to do. She takes you through the routine without any waffle, and it's quite brief, not hours of a job. I certainly felt much better afterwards, and will continue using it.

5 of 7 people found this review helpful

Quite effective for learning a language

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 17-07-12

Having learned other languages the conventional way at school, I was interested to see how I would fare with this method. I'm happy to say that it works. Of course, there's only time for the very basics on this book, but it gives you a starting point, and gives you a bit of confidence. You'd probably enjoy practising what you've learned while on holiday, or chatting with your (bemused) family around the house . . . .

11 of 13 people found this review helpful

Nice but not that effective.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 17-07-12

I persisted with this book for the recommended 21 days, and while it conjures up some lovely imagery (tropical islands, warm, sunny beaches) I'm not sure that it really had much effect on my eating habits. For the first few days it made me think "Do I really want to finish everything on my plate?" but then, I was back to normal . . .

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

Hmm, not sure . . .

Overall
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 17-07-12

This may not be for everyone. If you're open to trying new things, and open to self healing, then this could be useful, but we in the UK may find it a little over the top. I felt a bit silly doing the exercises at first, but as I went along, they were actually quite effective.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

Should be taught in Primary Schools!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 17-07-12

I can't praise this book enough; Steve Peters narrates his book in a down to earth, practical way, easy to understand for everyone who has any kind of interest in psychology. There are no unpronounceable technical terms, no lengthy ramblings about Jung or Freud - none of that stuff.
The book is written in simple terms that we can all understand and relate to. It is logically laid out so that each concept, such as your 'chimp', is explained BEFORE he starts talking about how to manage it (by giving it bananas), and how to put it to sleep in its box. He also talks about our goblins and gremlins, realistic and unrealistic expectations of life, and how to manage these.
I had several 'kerching' moments, when the penny dropped - so simple and obvious, and yet if you don't know what to look for, how can you find it and fix it? Steve Peters takes you through the simple steps you can take to do a 'spring clean' of your thinking and beliefs, and come out the other end a happier, more well balanced person.
What a tremendous difference it would make to our society if this stuff was taught from Primary School onwards. There'd be far less violence, for one thing, if we were all taught how to manage our 'chimps.'

173 of 185 people found this review helpful

Very uplifting

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 17-07-12

This book may seem a little dated now - it was recorded during the 1980s, I believe - as women's place in the world, and the workplace has greatly changed in the past decade or two. Nevertheless, for those of us born in times of 'a woman's place is in the home' this audio book shows clearly how we were manipulated (by our menfolk, the church, and schools) into believing that there were very few choices for us, and that we would probably fail if we tried anything different. It's very interesting, though, to see how the present situation has evolved, and very useful to women of a certain age who still have self - limiting beliefs and thoughts. Louise Hay has been a favourite of mine for decades, and has helped me through some difficult times. Her manner of speech is gentle, encouraging and gently amusing. Susan Jeffers is rather more brash in manner, but amusing, and makes some very interesting points. Susan Jeffers pinpoints how thought processes affect the body (she's a medical doctor), which is useful to know. The 4th lady (who isn't credited) is actually a more spiritual person, not to everyone's taste perhaps, but she has some valid points to make if you can overlook some of her more unusual views. I would certainly recommend this book, if nothing else it's very encouraging and positive.
PS for those younger ladies who have been caught up in the 1950s hype that's gripped the UK lately, you might learn a lot about how life REALLY was for those stay at home mums, and the attitudes of their husbands.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

Lark Rise to Candleford cover art

Wrong narrator for this book

Overall
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 17-07-12

While Flora Thompson's work is wonderful, beautiful and transports you to another, gentler and more sociable world, the effect is somewhat shattered by the choice of narrator for the audio book. Olivia Hallinan's voice is too 'bright', hard and clipped for such a dreamy story. She sounds like she would be more at home discussing the FTSE Index on the news programmes. I was unable to get past half way through Chapter One, I'm afraid, which is a great shame as Lark Rise to Candleford has been a great favourite of mine for nearly 40 years.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful