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Nigel Boot-Handford

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  • reviews
  • 1
  • helpful vote
  • 8
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  • The Pillars of the Earth

  • The Kingsbridge Novels, Book 1
  • By: Ken Follett
  • Narrated by: John Lee
  • Length: 40 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,577
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,701
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,702

The Pillars of the Earth tells the story of Philip, prior of Kingsbridge, a devout and resourceful monk driven to build the greatest Gothic cathedral the world has known... of Tom, the mason who becomes his architect - a man divided in his soul... of the beautiful, elusive Lady Aliena, haunted by a secret shame... and of a struggle between good and evil that will turn church against state, and brother against brother.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fabulous book

  • By Mrs on 23-12-12

Superb story superbly told.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 18-09-18

A classic,read the book many years back half watched the TV series and found that a bit “thin” this audio version allows you to build the mental pictures to your own pattern and the characters are portrayed superbly.


Just need to find the time slot to take the next step with the next of the Kingsbridge audio books. I

  • Under the Eagle

  • Eagles of the Empire, Book 1
  • By: Simon Scarrow
  • Narrated by: David Thorpe
  • Length: 12 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 839
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 775
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 778

The first novel in Simon Scarrow's bestselling Roman series. It is 42 AD, and Quintus Licinius Cato has just arrived in Germany as a new recruit to the Second Legion, the toughest in the Roman army. If adjusting to the rigours of military life isn't difficult enough for the bookish young man, he also has to contend with the disgust of his colleagues when, because of his imperial connections, he is appointed a rank above them.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Brilliant Series - now complete

  • By Simon on 24-08-15

Great listen the start of a long journey

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-09-17

Mentioned by others the only minor gripe, and it is minor is how the narrator vocalises the name of Cato.

The story is a toe in the water for the great interweaved tale of the Roman Empire in the 1st Century as seen by two chalk and cheese characters thrown together by fate and circumstance.

Historically it's key moments are placed correctly it's the picture that gets painted as interpreted by our main protagonists that brings the story to life.

Having read all of the series as soon they are published it's now a new treat to listen to the books whilst commuting . The story is the same, the experience different the pleasure meeting again our two rough legionaries enhanced by our narrators interpretation, even if he can't get KAY-TOE correct.

Overall it's like having the original album on vinyl and now having gone and got the CD. I'm keeping the books and I do occasionally reread this is a new way to enjoy and old favourite.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • A Town Like Alice

  • By: Nevil Shute
  • Narrated by: Robin Bailey
  • Length: 10 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 430
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 353
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 352

Jean Paget is just twenty years old and working in Malaya when the Japanese invasion begins. When she is captured she joins a group of other European women and children whom the Japanese force to march for miles through the jungle. While on the march, the group run into some Australian prisoners, one of whom, Joe Harman, helps them steal some food, and is horrifically punished by the Japanese as a result.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Great Book Well Read

  • By Kindle Customer on 31-03-09

A Shute classic

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 17-01-17

I first came across Nevil Shute as a young school boy in the 70's and gradually read all of his books initially fascinated by the references to the areas of West London, especially Perivale where I grew up. Even to the point of taking the books out from the library before buying them as paperbacks later on. I've returned to then every few years as great books to reread and enjoy again.

This is one of the best (and to my mind they are all good, not perhaps regarded as classic literature but engaging well constructed and well told tales) and in an spoken word version actually

Yes this book reflects the manners, standards and racial stereotypes of its time but that in a way is no bad thing, what was once the norm is not of today but this is a period piece and is set in a timeframe now long gone.

As a performance Robin Bailey is nigh on perfect as the narrator Mr Strawn, the story still has resonance even though the war is now moving out of the range living memory for those who were old enough to have been directly impacted.

My father and his brothers who served in the war told tales of the war in the Far East, the forgotten army, and shared memories of that pre war colonial era that died in 1941.

All in all well worth hearing the book played out as a different experience to rereading.