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Lucy

Cheshire
  • 11
  • reviews
  • 49
  • helpful votes
  • 36
  • ratings
  • Black Heart

  • Detective Dan Riley, Book 1
  • By: Anna-Lou Weatherley
  • Narrated by: James Lailey
  • Length: 9 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 598
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 552
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 549

When Nigel Baxter, a middle-aged married banker with an unremarkable past, is found dead in the bath of a plush hotel suite, his wrists slit, it looks as if he's taken his own life. At first. But when Detective Inspector Daniel Riley is assigned to the case, he soon realises all isn't as it first appears to be. When a postmortem shows Baxter was poisoned, Riley suspects foul play. And then there's the odd addition of a teddy bear left at the crime scene....

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Great story!

  • By Ann D on 21-03-18

Predictable thriller

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-09-18

This was a predictable thriller. I'm not the most experienced thriller reader, but I guessed most of the twists before they happened, including how it would end. Nevertheless, I did find that I wanted to keep listening, but I think that was less to do with the story and more to do with the brilliant narration. James Lailey is truly excellent. His accents are flawless and when he does a woman's voice you don't feel that he's just putting on a high pitched girly sound (like so many other male narrators). I really was pulled in by his voice.

The lead character, Dan the detective, is interesting enough, but he was getting very (very) irritating with his constant memories of his dead girlfriend, Rachel (I'm not giving anything away here, it's one of the first things you find out about him). But the constant "Rachel this, Rachel that" was tiresome. Parts of the story contained way too much exposition and it felt a bit cheap that so much of the story appeared to hang on a coincidence.

It's not going to blow minds, but it did keep me fairly engaged during long dog walks, although not so engaged that I wasn't able to turn it off as soon as I got home (which is my test for how gripping a story is). I got this on a daily deal, so only a couple of quid. I might have given it one less star if I'd had to pay a credit!

  • In Cold Blood

  • Beatrix Rose, Book 1
  • By: Mark Dawson
  • Narrated by: Mark Deakins
  • Length: 4 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 192
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 182
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 179

They gunned down her husband and kidnapped her daughter, and now the debt needs to be repaid. It's a blood feud she didn't start but is going to finish. Beatrix has already crossed one name off her Kill List. Her second target is a mercenary being held hostage by Somali terrorists. Can she infiltrate the most dangerous failed state on the planet and scrub him off the List, too?

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Well worth a read!

  • By Susan D on 24-11-14

Disappointing in many ways

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 20-06-18

I was expecting good things after reading all the many 4 and 5 star reviews of this book, but now I'm wondering whether we all read/listened to the same book. I am a big fan of Mark Dawson's John Milton series, which is why I downloaded "In cold blood". I was prepared for a weak first book to the series, since the first John Milton book (The Cleaner) had been patchy, so I really did listen with an open mind. But no, not even an open mind could prepare me for this. The plot - such as it is - was derivative and uninspired. The characterisation was waver thin. Don't expect there to be ANY character development, at all. Whereas the John Milton books allowed you to get under John's skin - this book had very little about Beatrix other than a bit of backstory about her need for revenge and her need to protect her daughter. You learned more about Beatrix from her appearance in the John Milton series than from this book, which is a huge shame as she has the potential to be a fascinating character. It did make me wonder whether Mark Dawson's heart had been in writing this or whether this was just a by-the-numbers effort to capitalise on the John Milton series.

Whilst the thin story and characterisation were disappointing, the thing that was most irritating was the narrator. If this book had been read by someone with more skill, then it might have made the experience a bit more enjoyable. This is a book with a female protagonist - so why not choose a female narrator? Mark Deakins' female voice is a soft, insipid and sometimes high pitched caricature that makes Beatrix and her daughter sound weak and pathetic. I've listened to men read female voices many times and it's never been quite as jarring. This is also a book where most of the lead characters are English - so why not choose an English narrator? Mark Deakins' English accent makes the male characters sound effeminate and stuck up. He's just not convincing, which results in the listener being taken out of the audio book experience, which is never a good thing.

If this all sounds a tad harsh, then it just reflects my disappointment with this book. The only saving grace is that it's not very long, so the pain is short-lived. I've given it two stars instead of one because, ultimately, I did manage to get to the end. If, however, you are an avid John Milton fan and love David Thorpe's narration, then I suggest you avoid this so you can leave those great memories untarnished.

  • Zero Day: John Puller, Book 1

  • By: David Baldacci
  • Narrated by: Ron McLarty, Orlagh Cassidy
  • Length: 13 hrs and 7 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 951
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 743
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 746

John Puller is a former war hero and now the best military investigator in the U.S. Army’s Criminal Investigative Division. He is a loner with few possessions by preference, but he has an indomitable spirit and an unstoppable determination for finding the truth. His father was the most decorated U.S. Marine in history, but now resides in a nursing home far from his battlefield glory. Puller’s older brother, also a military vet, is serving a life sentence in Leavenworth Penitentiary. Puller is called out to a remote, rural area far from any military outpost to investigate into the brutal murder of a family....

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Beware loud music

  • By Marcia on 02-01-12

Disappointing and dull

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 20-11-16

If this book wasn’t for you, who do you think might enjoy it more?

Someone who likes their heroes to be perfect and enjoys reading books with implausible story lines, one dimensional characters, confused endings and very little tension.

What could David Baldacci have done to make this a more enjoyable book for you?

John Puller could have been a great character, instead he comes across as a know-it-all, who is always in control and always wins the fight. This means there is zero tension whenever Puller is in trouble, because the reader knows that he will fix the problem and come out on top (the fact that there is a series of books dedicated to this character also means that he's never at risk of dying in any of the dangerous situations he gets into because he has to survive in order to appear in the sequel, a bit like James Bond, but infinitely less sexy).

Puller also comes across like a Mills & Boon hero - and not in a good way - he's physically perfect (tall, over six foot), well built ("fills the door frame" when he's standing in it), women fancy him and he has buckets of medals to show how brave he is. He doesn't have any obvious flaws and no human weaknesses (except for some bad combat dreams) - which probably makes him one of the most boring protagonists I've ever encountered.

The end was also a huge let down - after investing many hours trying to figure out who the bad guys were, it all gets resolved in the last 30 mins or so in an almost dismissive manner. It felt like Baldacci had run out of steam, as if he'd got a bit bored with his own book and decided to wrap it up and move on to something new. I felt cheated. I deserved a better pay off for all the time I'd invested and the extreme amounts of patience I had shown in hanging in there until the end.

Have you listened to any of Ron McLarty and Orlagh Cassidy ’s other performances? How does this one compare?

Yes - I've listened to Baldacci's "Memory Man" which Ron and Orlagh narrated. I have to say that Ron and Orlagh are very good indeed. I knocked off one star because Ron struggles to give different characters different voices, which sometimes means the listener isn't quite sure who is speaking, but it's a small quibble. Their collaboration on "Zero Day" was a lot smoother and less disjointed than in "Memory Man", so that was a plus too.

You didn’t love this book--but did it have any redeeming qualities?

This audio book uses music and sound effects in an interesting way - which do help to heighten the tension.

The female lead character was strong and well drawn. It's always good to find stories where the woman isn't the helpless victim - so kudos for that.

I also learned a few things I didn't know about how the Army operates, which provided an interesting insight into this particular world.

Any additional comments?

I really wanted to like John Puller, but he just came across as too robotic - if he'd had some human flaws, then I think he would have made a very interesting, multi-faceted character. Perhaps he gets better in the rest of the series, but after this disappointment, I'm afraid that I won't be listening to any more to find out.

  • Spectacles

  • By: Sue Perkins
  • Narrated by: Sue Perkins
  • Length: 8 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,422
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 2,230
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,222

Penguin presents the unabridged, downloadable audiobook edition of Spectacles, the hilarious, creative and incredibly moving memoir from much loved comedian, writer and presenter Sue Perkins. When I began writing this book, I went home to see if my mum had kept some of my stuff. What I found was that she hadn't kept some of it. She had kept all of it - every bus ticket, postcard, school report....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I loved this book

  • By Jeannette on 31-01-16

Funny, warm and interesting

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-11-16

What did you like most about Spectacles?

The narration was splendid and I laughed out loud many times during the book (as well as shedding the odd tear during a couple of the sadder moments). I have never watched Bake Off or seen Sue in any of her TV programs, so I didn't really know much about her, but that didn't matter - the book stands alone whether you know Sue or not. I found the sections where she described how she started her career in comedy particularly interesting.

What other book might you compare Spectacles to, and why?

I guess any autobiography by a comic might be similar to Spectacles, but this is the only one I've listened to in this genre.

Which character – as performed by Sue Perkins – was your favourite?

Erm, Sue Perkins herself

If you made a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

Funny gay middle class woman becomes a successful comic despite the odds

Any additional comments?

This is a very relaxing read. The best parts are definitely the start and middle, with the ending perhaps the least interesting (this is where Sue talks about her more recent TV documentaries/shows for the BBC after Bake Off) - that's not to say that this later part of the book is boring, it's not, but by comparison to what has come before, well, it's a hard act to follow and it left me with this feeling that perhaps Sue's best work was behind her. I sincerely hope not as she is a very talented lady.

  • The Cleaner

  • John Milton, Book 1
  • By: Mark Dawson
  • Narrated by: David Thorpe
  • Length: 8 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,263
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 2,081
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,083

Meet John Milton. He considers himself an artisan. A craftsman. His trade is murder. Milton is the man the government sends after you when everything else has failed. Ruthless. Brilliant. Anonymous. Lethal. You wouldn't pick him out of a crowd but you wouldn't want to be on his list. But now, after ten years, he's had enough - there's blood on his hands and he wants out. Trouble is, this job is not one you can just walk away from. He goes on the run, seeking atonement for his sins by helping the people he meets along the way.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Good but oddly unsatisfying

  • By Lucy on 05-11-16

Good but oddly unsatisfying

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-11-16

Would you recommend this book to a friend? Why or why not?

I purchased this book because I'd listened to a later one in the John Milton series and had enjoyed it, so it made sense to start at the beginning. However, if my first introduction to the series had been with "The Cleaner", I don't think I would have bothered reading the rest of them. Without giving away any spoilers, I thought the ending was quite unsatisfactory and it didn't feel as if it had a proper conclusion. Actually, it was all a bit of a downer.

So, on that basis, I'm not sure that I would recommend "The Cleaner", rather I would say to my friend to give it a go on the basis that they do get better and this first book does provide a reasonable introduction to the hero, but not to have any big expectations that this will blow anyone's mind.

Would you recommend The Cleaner to your friends? Why or why not?

Despite the downer ending, I will say that "The Cleaner" introduces an interesting and compelling character in the form of John Milton. He's a more damaged, less suave James Bond type, but just as lethal. Some of the things he does do defy logic and it's not entirely clear sometimes what his motivation is... but he is engaging and has a fascination. Like I said above, if it hadn't been for the ending I would be recommending this to friends.

Have you listened to any of David Thorpe’s other performances? How does this one compare?

When I first started listening to David Thorpe I almost turned off the audiobook because he reminded me so much of the narrator in TV's Big Brother. It was so irritating. However, I persevered and he began to grow on me. In "The Cleaner" he is less Big Brother-like, so less irritating, or perhaps I just got used to it. One thing I will say is that he is absolutely brilliant with his accents and voices. I actually had to check how many narrators were on this book because they all sounded so different. I was totally impressed. Also, the voice he does for John Milton is perfect - he seems to really capture the essence of the character in the way he speaks, it's quite a delight to listen to (and just a bit sexy). So, the Big Brother issue aside (for which I've deducted one star), I do think David Thorpe does a great job overall.

Was The Cleaner worth the listening time?

Yes, although had I known how it was going to end I'm not sure I would have invested the time and effort. Having said that, "The Cleaner" does set up the rest of the series and having already read one of the later books I do know they get better, so I'm glad I've got this background into the character.

Any additional comments?

It's clear a lot of work and research has gone into this book and some of the gang characters really stand out. John Milton is very believable as the assassin trying to go straight, the typical anti-hero - but sometimes I did find some of the things he did a bit hard to understand and his motivation wasn't always that convincing. But, all that aside, the book did keep me entertained and rooting for the hero - in fact, I binged listened to the last couple of hours as the book began to reach its climax, so that must say something.

17 of 18 people found this review helpful

  • Never Look Back

  • DI Mike Lockyer, Book 1
  • By: Clare Donoghue
  • Narrated by: Karl Prekopp, Imogen Church
  • Length: 8 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 749
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 676
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 680

Three women have been found brutally murdered in south London, the victims only feet away from help during each sadistic attack. And the killer is getting braver.... Sarah Grainger is rapidly becoming too afraid to leave her house. Once an outgoing photographer, she knows that someone is watching her. A cryptic note brings everything into terrifying focus, but it’s the chilling phone calls that take the case to another level. DI Mike Lockyer heads up the regional murder squad. With three bodies on his watch, and a killer growing in confidence, he frantically tries to find the link between these seemingly isolated incidents.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • An excellent debut

  • By Saffy on 25-04-14

Weak thriller

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 21-03-16

What could have made this a 4 or 5-star listening experience for you?

A more believable storyline, more likeable characters, better narration by Imogen, less padding - this really was a serial-killer-by-the-numbers book. Characters were un-engaging and mostly one-dimensional - I didn't care about them, to the point where I didn't even feel sad at the end.

What could Clare Donoghue have done to make this a more enjoyable book for you?

Spent more effort creating fully rounded characters, developing better interaction between them, editing out all the padding (all that stuff with the autistic brother was boring). There were loads of "he said", "she said", so much that I started listening out for them and it ruined the experience - there should have been a lot more editing before publishing.

What do you think the narrator could have done better?

Can't fault Karl's narration, but Imogen's was just awful. Her attempt at a male voice was toe curling and she made Sarah sound so pathetic, girly and basically annoying. Every time Imogen spoke, I was lifted out of the story - not good.

What reaction did this book spark in you? Anger, sadness, disappointment?

Disappointment mostly. The author had her main character embark on a relationship that seemed to come out of nowhere and was totally unconvincing. I just didn't buy for a minute that Mike would do that. The ending was also really abrupt and seemed to hinge on a chance observation by a cleaner, leaving me feeling most frustrated with the "god in the machine" tactics employed.

Any additional comments?

I was really disappointed by how much of a victim Sarah is, she just whines the whole time and is full of self-doubt. I just wanted to shake her and say "get a grip!" As a female writer, I would have hoped for stronger female characters. Jane is just a foil for Mike, nothing of substance there at all. Shame, really, it's a missed opportunity to promote strong female characters.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Forge of God

  • By: Greg Bear
  • Narrated by: Stephen Bel Davies
  • Length: 16 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 86
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 68
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 67

On September 28th, a geologist working in Death Valley finds a mysterious new cinder cone in very well-mapped area. On October 1, the government of Australia announces the discovery of an enormous granite mountain. Like the cinder cone, it wasn't there six months ago.

Something is happening to planet Earth, and the truth is too terrifying to contemplate

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fabulous sci Fi

  • By Mrs. L. Swinburn on 20-07-16

Slow, dull, wordy and painfully long

Overall
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 26-06-12

I bought this because I was intrigued by the premise and love a good sci-fi story. However, by the end of the 19+ hours, I had lost the will to live and just wanted it to be over. Here are some reasons why:

1. there is far too much description about everything - the scenery, the science, the characters' inner thoughts - all of this just slows down the action. There were entire sequences were nothing much happened and, half way through the second part, the story stopped to allow the characters to have long moments of introspection about the meaning of life, death etc. For what seemed like hours (and it probably was) - nothing much happened. In fact, I ended up fast forwarding the book by 30 seconds at a time to see when the story would pick up again. I was totally bored and frustrated by this stage

2. there are so many characters that it was difficult to keep track of them all (especially on audio). This also resulted in a huge amount of 'he said, she said, he said, she said' which was distracting. The number of characters also made it difficult to know who was the hero. I presume this was Arthur since he was in the story the longest, but he wasn't all that relatable and I found it hard to warm to him. In fact, I didn't really care at the end what happened to him - which is never a good sign.

It wasn't all bad - the idea is good, reasonably original and raises some interesting questions. The narration by Stephen Bel Davies is excellent - his accents were superb and he brought the different characters to life. The ending did not disappoint.

If you like your books full of inner thoughts, descriptive sequences and philosophical debate then you might enjoy this. I prefer books to have strong characters and a good brisk pace that keep me hooked to the very end. The only reason I managed to finish listening to this was out of curiosity to find out what happened in the end, not because I cared. I’m not sure this was the best use of 19 hrs of my life.

2 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • My Big Fat Greek Diet

  • By: Nick Yphantides, Mike Yorkey
  • Narrated by: Nick Yphantides
  • Length: 5 hrs and 51 mins
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars 1
  • Performance
    0 out of 5 stars 0
  • Story
    0 out of 5 stars 0

"Dr. Nick" shares the amazing eating plan that helped him shed 267 pounds, and keep them off. As a medical doctor who has personally struggled with his weight, Dr. Nick Yphantides can empathize with the plight of the overweight and offer a proven, medically safe plan for losing weight. In My Big Fat Greek Diet, he teaches readers the powerful 7 Pillars of Weight Loss.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Inspiring but of limited value

  • By Lucy on 14-06-12

Inspiring but of limited value

Overall
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 14-06-12

I found Nick Yphantides' personal story about how he lost weight both interesting and inspiring. However, how he lost his weight is not really all that applicable to people who live in the real world. Nick took time off from his job as a doctor to travel around the US in a camper van going from one baseball game to another (his passion). During this time he drank only protein shakes and despite the tempation of hot dogs and burgers at the baseball stadiums, he never cheated or waivered in his resolve to lose the weight. He was incredibly disciplined and focused, helped no doubt by the fact that he was doing something that he was very passionate about (ie watching baseball games) and he had support in the forms of friends and family who would join him at various stages of his trip. Whilst this all makes for an interesting story, it doesn't make for a helpful weight loss strategy because:
- not everyone can take time off from their busy stressful lives in order to go off and do something else (bills still need to be paid!)
- not everyone has the discipline to live off protein shakes until the weight has come off (I can't remember exactly how many calories Nick was eating but this was definitely a low calorie diet, under 1000 cals a day for sure)
- not everyone has the support network in place to help them shed the weight

I absolutely admire Nick for having achieved what he has, but I note that his story ends with him now living on a primarily protein rich and therefore limited diet. I felt a bit sad upon the conclusion of Nick's story because he's clearly had to trade most of the food he used to enjoy for the pleasure of being in a fit healthy body. I just wish there was a way of having it all !! But if Nick's story has taught me anything it's that will power and self-discipline are still necessary for weight loss and, sadly, most dieters are in short supply of both

It's Never Crowded Along the Extra Mile cover art
  • It's Never Crowded Along the Extra Mile

  • 10 Secrets for Success and Inner Peace
  • By: Wayne W. Dyer
  • Narrated by: Wayne W. Dyer
  • Length: 9 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 14
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 2
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 1

Drawing upon the lessons of great teachers such as St. Francis of Assisi, Viktor Frankl, Jesus Christ, Nelson Mandela, Mother Teresa, and Buddha, Dr. Dyer helps you discover that you can achieve true inner peace and success by integrating ten powerful "secrets" into your life that can transform your everyday existence into a path for spiritual enlightenment.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Could have been better...

  • By Lucy on 17-07-09

Could have been better...

Overall
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 17-07-09

On the positive side, the quality of this recording is good and Wayne Dyer's voice is very appealing. He also has some nice stories, makes many excellent points and brought a smile to my face several times with his dry humour. However, this recording is far too long and really would have benefited from editing to give it more structure and help pick up the pace. For example, it really wasn't necessary to include the sections where a member of the audience sings a song and another one plays a trombone!

Wayne Dyer goes through the secrets for success and inner peace, but his tendency to ramble on means he goes off track many times and I found myself forgetting which secret he was talking about until he sort of pulled it all together at the end. When I first heard most of these secrets they seemed self-evident to me, although the last one was interesting enough to warrant having ploughed through the preceding nine hours.

One major irritation I had throughout this recording is Wayne Dyer's constant references to his own books and his own achievements. It felt on many occasions as if he was simply massaging his own ego or trying to promote sales of his books. I expected a bit more humility from someone with his reputation, but just like Joe Vitale (who is 100 times worse at this kind of self-promotion) Wayne Dyer appears not to want to miss an opportunity to get those royalties coming in. One particularly irritating moment came when he talked about a wonderful meditation technique and then said you'd have to get his book if you wanted to find out more.

So, bottom line, this is a rather self-indulgent and over long recording, BUT it does contain a certain amount of useful and interesting information AND his delivery is excellent. If you don't mind Wayne Dyer marketing to you on your dime and in your personal time, then you'll probably enjoy this. I, for one, would have preferred a little less self-promotion and a bit less ego.

18 of 18 people found this review helpful

  • How to Write Selling Humor

  • By: Peter Mehlman, Mel Helitzer
  • Narrated by: Peter Mehlman, Mel Helitzer
  • Length: 2 hrs and 57 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars 4
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 2
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars 1

Humor is ignored and misunderstood in writing. But learning to use humor will improve your writing and your bottom line. These two workshops are from experts who can help you ride the comedy wave to successful humor writing.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Disappointing and limited

  • By Lucy on 18-01-09

Disappointing and limited

Overall
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 18-01-09

Beware! The first workshop by Peter Mehlman was recorded when President Reagan was still in office so you may find it rather out of date! The constant references to Bob Newhart, Johnny Carson and Bob Hope are another giveaway that this recording has probably lost most of its relevance to today?s comedy writers. Mostly Mehlman talks about selling jokes rather than selling longer comedy sketches and he focuses almost exclusively on selling to the print market. Whilst I managed to get a couple of nuggets from this workshop, most of it was obvious and basic stuff. I found Mehlman?s delivery too slow and rather dreary. Although he tries, he never really manages to evoke much humour. I was, therefore, disappointed by this workshop and I would have been most put out had the second workshop not been a considerable improvement. Mel Helitzer (who delivers the second workshop) is a co-producer and writer on ?Seinfeld? and his presentation is full of funny examples, anecdotes and helpful tips. The problem is that unless you are familiar with ?Seinfeld? you may not appreciate much of what Helitzer is talking about. You may also struggle to understand him since the quality of the recording is not great. Nevertheless, I managed to get several more nuggets from Helitzer to help me with my comedy writing, so the investment of just under three hours and ?7.99 was not entirely wasted. All the same, I won?t be listening to this again and I cannot recommend it as a truly helpful guide to writing comedy.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful