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Gregory Monk

  • 24
  • reviews
  • 38
  • helpful votes
  • 324
  • ratings
  • Explaining Social Deviance

  • By: Paul Root Wolpe, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Paul Root Wolpe
  • Length: 7 hrs and 34 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 21
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 19
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 17

How do deviants reconcile their behavior with society's norms? This set of 10 lectures examines the complex topic of deviance and how major sociological theories have attempted to define it and understand its role in both historical and modern society. Professor Wolpe introduces deviance as "a complex, often ambiguous, social phenomenon that raises numerous questions about how a varied and often arbitrary set of characteristics can be used to name the same idea."

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Thought provoking

  • By C on 15-06-15

A tad dated but interesting all the same

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 24-07-17

Which scene did you most enjoy?

There were plenty of lectures that were interesting but the sociology of science was certainly something to ponder.

Any additional comments?

These lectures came out around the time of the OJ Simpson trial and so has references rooted around this time. I would be interested to learn where the study of social deviance has progressed to from that point.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Wyrd Sisters

  • By: Terry Pratchett
  • Narrated by: Celia Imrie
  • Length: 14 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,297
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,037
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,035

In Wyrd Sisters, the enchanting world of Discworld is turned upside down by 3 meddling witches: Granny Weatherwax, Nanny Ogg, and Magrat Garlick. Their interference in royal politics causes kingdoms to wobble, crowns to topple, knives to flash, and citizens to shudder in fear.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Hard work

  • By Linda on 05-05-09

A problem with the recording, NOT the narrator

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 20-07-17

What could have made this a 4 or 5-star listening experience for you?

I am sure this would have easily achieved that, had the recording been better.

How did the narrator detract from the book?

In absolutely no way did the narrator detract away from the book. The bits I made out were very good.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • A Paradise Built in Hell

  • The Extraordinary Communities That Arise in Disaster
  • By: Rebecca Solnit
  • Narrated by: Emily Beresford
  • Length: 13 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 12
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 11

A Paradise Built in Hell is an investigation of the moments of altruism, resourcefulness, and generosity that arise amid disaster's grief and disruption and considers their implications for everyday life. It points to a new vision of what society could become - one that is less authoritarian and fearful, more collaborative and local.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Similar to Shock Doctrine but from another angle

  • By Gregory Monk on 19-07-17

Similar to Shock Doctrine but from another angle

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-07-17

What was one of the most memorable moments of A Paradise Built in Hell?

The descriptions of the aftermath of Katrina were shocking to a non-American and something I was surprised to hear. The basic failures of the government during this time was something that I was aware of but the details were grisly and something I won't forget, and nor should I.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

The entirety of the book was filled with moving encounters of underrepresented examples of humans at their best in the worst possible scenarios. I certainly recommend it to those who have lost their faith in the people of the modern world.

  • Radicals

  • Outsiders Changing the World
  • By: Jamie Bartlett
  • Narrated by: Roger Davis
  • Length: 10 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 71
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 62
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 62

Jamie Bartlett takes us inside the worlds of innovators, disruptors, idealists and extremists who think society is broken, and believe they know how to fix it. Radicals introduces us to techno-futurists questing for immortality, far-right groups seeking to close borders, environmentalists striving to save the planet, libertarian movements founding new countries, autonomous cooperatives in self-sustaining micro-societies and psychedelic pioneers attempting to heal society

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • A personal exploration of the ridiculous and extre

  • By J on 03-01-18

Like Theroux and Ronson but without the neurosis

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-07-17

What did you like best about this story?

It covered a wide range of societies radicals whilst remaining understanding yet clear eyed.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Given the book was set out into clear distinct chapters it remained fresh when moving on from one person (or group of people) to the next and so listening in one sitting was not a problem.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • The Bricks That Built the Houses

  • By: Kate Tempest
  • Narrated by: Kate Tempest
  • Length: 9 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 144
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 136
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 135

Award-winning poet and rapper Kate Tempest's electrifying debut novel takes us into the beating heart of the capital in this multigenerational tale of drugs, desire and belonging. It gets into your bones. You don't even realise it until you're driving through it, watching all the things you've always known and leaving them behind. Young Londoners Becky, Harry and Leon are leaving town in a fourth-hand Ford Cortina with a suitcase full of money.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Stunning use of language

  • By Amazon Customer on 27-06-18

The best contemporary fiction I've read in a while

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-07-17

If you could sum up The Bricks That Built the Houses in three words, what would they be?

Edgy, piercing, beautiful.

What was one of the most memorable moments of The Bricks That Built the Houses?

I personally enjoyed the beginning of the book and its take down of the London elite's culture. She summed it up perfectly.

What does Kate Tempest bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you had only read the book?

Her performance is unique in comparison to any other audiobook I have listened to. Nobody else could have gotten close to expressing the essence of the book than Kate herself (something which isn't always to be taken for granted).

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • 23 Things They Don't Tell You about Capitalism

  • By: Ha-Joon Chang
  • Narrated by: Joe Barrett
  • Length: 8 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 393
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 300
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 300

If you've wondered how we did not see the economic collapse coming, Ha-Joon Chang knows the answer: We didn't ask what they didn't tell us about capitalism. This is a lighthearted book with a serious purpose: to question the assumptions behind the dogma and sheer hype that the dominant school of neoliberal economists-the apostles of the freemarket-have spun since the Age of Reagan.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliant!

  • By nev on 31-03-17

Pulls down neoliberalism expertly

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-07-17

Would you listen to 23 Things They Don't Tell You about Capitalism again? Why?

I think it will be useful at some point so as to refresh myself when it comes to those late night drunken debates.

Any additional comments?

Understanding that a truly free market would potentially include absolutely no worker rights, child labour and an absence of information on the packaging of the food you purchase better helped me to understand exactly what neoliberalism could become if pursued religiously.

  • Twitter and Tear Gas

  • The Power and Fragility of Networked Protest
  • By: Zeynep Tufekci
  • Narrated by: Carly Robins
  • Length: 13 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 9
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 9
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9

An incisive observer, writer, and participant in today's social movements, Zeynep Tufekci explains in this accessible and compelling book the nuanced trajectories of modern protests - how they form, how they operate differently from past protests, and why they have difficulty persisting in their long-term quests for change.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • An in-depth look @ social media's role in protests

  • By Gregory Monk on 19-07-17

An in-depth look @ social media's role in protests

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-07-17

What other book might you compare Twitter and Tear Gas to, and why?

Sections of the book reminded me of Nothing Is True And Everything Is Possible in that it helps to explain the use of information glutting as a way of obscuring the truth and muddying the waters, leading to confusion and paralysis of would be dissenters.

Any additional comments?

A reasoned account of social media from a person with undoubted experience of protests. It was refreshing to listen to the views of someone who neither attacked social media as a complete write off, nor highlighted it as the best thing since sliced bread.

  • Dark Money

  • How a secretive group of billionaires is trying to buy political control in the US
  • By: Jane Mayer
  • Narrated by: Laurel Lefkow
  • Length: 16 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 71
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 63
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 62

Why is America living in an age of profound economic inequality? Why, despite the desperate need to address climate change, have even modest environmental efforts been defeated again and again? Why have protections for employees been decimated? Why do hedge-fund billionaires pay a far lower tax rate than middle-class workers? The conventional answer is that a popular uprising against "big government" led to the ascendancy of a broad-based conservative movement.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A book to understand why we are where we are

  • By Gregory Monk on 19-07-17

A book to understand why we are where we are

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-07-17

Where does Dark Money rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

Towards the top as it is both an important historical documentation that perfectly describes why we are where we are right now and there were no issues at all with the narration.

Who was your favorite character and why?

It was a book of villains.

Any additional comments?

I found this book particularly useful in both expanding my knowledge on political framing and also for seeing the Libertarian movement for what it is, at the top level.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • No Is Not Enough

  • Defeating the New Shock Politics
  • By: Naomi Klein
  • Narrated by: Brit Marling
  • Length: 7 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 371
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 332
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 330

Trump, as extreme as he is, is less an aberration than a logical conclusion - a pastiche of pretty much all the worst and most dangerous trends of the past half century. A one-man megabrand, with wife and children as spin-off brands.... Remember when it all seemed to be getting better? Before Trump happened? Naomi Klein, internationally acclaimed journalist, activist and best-selling author, shows us how we got to this surreal and dangerous place, how to stop it getting a lot worse, and how, if we keep our heads, we can make things better.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A manifesto for the rest of my life...

  • By benslaters on 06-08-17

A timely culmination of all of Klein's ideas

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-07-17

What was one of the most memorable moments of No Is Not Enough?

Too many to mention. It was a culmination of all Klein's ideas, perfectly summing up politics as it is now. It has certainly helped me to approach the disastrous election results with less trepidation and confusion. Showing that Trump is a symptom of the problems we have in the West as opposed to a freak result of an open democracy is crucial when it comes to making transformations for the future we want.

Any additional comments?

If only she was more widely read, perhaps events like this could be avoided rather than us all retrospectively slapping her on the back for diagnosing our worsening problems

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • It's All in Your Head

  • Stories from the Frontline of Psychosomatic Illness
  • By: Suzanne O'Sullivan
  • Narrated by: Maggie Ollerenshaw
  • Length: 10 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 184
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 167
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 165

Pauline first became ill when she was 15. What seemed to be a urinary infection became joint pain, then life-threatening appendicitis. After a routine operation, Pauline lost all the strength in her legs. Shortly afterwards, convulsions started. But Pauline's tests are normal: her symptoms seem to have no physical cause whatsoever. This may be an extreme case, but Pauline is not alone. As many as a third of people visiting their GPs have symptoms that are medically unexplained.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Life-Changing

  • By Sam on 18-08-16

Might now have a phobia of getting hypochondria!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 13-06-17

What did you like best about this story?

Perhaps because of the nature of the patients involved it was important to get to know them in a little depth, personally, which gives you more of an investment in the outcome of their treatment when compared to some other books which take a drier and less personal look at their case studies.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

None of the patients had simple lives, each having to endure their illnesses to different extents but refreshing throughout was the care that the author had for those she treated, even extending to one patient who did not even need her help at all. It was good to see her response to this was not one of disdain or cruelty, as is often seen by the public. She clearly thrives in this work.

Any additional comments?

The only issue, which the author herself acknowledges, is that in her line of work she doesn't necessarily see the cases all the way through to the end, given how difficult it can be to convince her patients of the nature of their problems. Many walk away, others are moved on to other people. It would be nice to know what happened to every patient, though for obvious reasons, that isn't possible.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful