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  • 6
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  • Life After Life

  • By: Kate Atkinson
  • Narrated by: Fenella Woolgar
  • Length: 15 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,736
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,563
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,545

What if you had the chance to live your life again and again, until you finally got it right? During a snowstorm in England in 1910, a baby is born and dies before she can take her first breath. During a snowstorm in England in 1910, the same baby is born and lives to tell the tale. What if there were second chances? And third chances? In fact an infinite number of chances to live your life? Would you eventually be able to save the world from its own inevitable destiny? And would you even want to?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Intriguing story of "what ifs"

  • By Kirstine on 13-05-13

Engrossing book, superb performance

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 29-07-15

Really interesting story (although I was just a teeny bit bored of it by the end) but the narrator was fantastic, I heartily recommend her.

  • Murder on the Home Front

  • A True Story of Morgues, Murderers and Mysteries in the Blitz
  • By: Molly Lefebure
  • Narrated by: Lucy Scott
  • Length: 9 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 54
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 44
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 42

It is 1941. While the 'war of chaos' rages in the skies above London, an unending fight against violence, murder and the criminal underworld continues on the streets below. One ordinary day, in an ordinary courtroom, forensic pathologist Dr Keith Simpson asks a keen young journalist to be his secretary. Although the 'horrors of secretarial work' don't appeal to Molly Lefebure, she's intrigued to find out exactly what goes on behind a mortuary door.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Murder, war, trials and sardine sandwiches

  • By Sonia on 11-04-13

Fascinating and slightly creepy

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-07-14

The narrator takes a job as secretary to a pathologist during WW2 and her subsequent memoir becomes a really interesting piece of social history. It's fascinating to hear about the long hours the pathologists (and the police) had to work and the awful conditions they worked in. The descriptions of the tragic deaths of the people - who became the corpses they worked on - are very moving. Molly Lefebure has no compassion at all for the murderers, although some of them came from dreadful backgrounds and led hopeless lives, culminating in a squalid death; I think this shows her privileged position in society, but I did find it upsetting.
It's not the kind of thing I can listen to without breaks and it's also too creepy to listen to when you're on your own at night...
The narration is very good indeed, just the right kind of voice.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Castle

  • By: Franz Kafka
  • Narrated by: Allan Corduner
  • Length: 13 hrs and 8 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 50
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 41
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 41

A land-surveyor, known only as K., arrives at a small village permanently covered in snow and dominated by a castle to which access seems permanently denied. K.'s attempts to discover why he has been called constantly run up against the peasant villagers, who are in thrall to the absurd bureaucracy that keeps the castle shut, and the rigid hierarchy of power among the self-serving bureaucrats themselves.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Loved it

  • By Mark on 09-02-14

Not my idea of a good read

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-07-14

Would you consider the audio edition of The Castle to be better than the print version?

I have to be honest and say that, although this was superbly read, I was irritated with the story and I borrowed a copy of the print version just so I could skim to the end and claim I'd read it.

What was the most interesting aspect of this story? The least interesting?

What does it mean? For me it was exactly like one of those horrible, involved dreams where you can't get anywhere, or do anything, and there is a lingering sense of menace.

What about Allan Corduner’s performance did you like?

Everything, he's a really good performer and I'd happily listen to him again.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

I was moved to tears of relief when I finally "finished" it.

Any additional comments?

Despite not enjoying it at all, it's nearly a year since I listened to it and I can still remember a lot about it and I still think about it - perhaps that's why it is considered a masterpiece?

2 of 3 people found this review helpful