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Judith

Pinner, United Kingdom
  • 14
  • reviews
  • 73
  • helpful votes
  • 78
  • ratings
  • Waterland

  • By: Graham Swift
  • Narrated by: Christian Rodska
  • Length: 12 hrs and 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 81
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 68
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 67

This brilliant and compelling novel is at once a lyrical description of the Fens, a fictional autobiography, and an impassioned defence of history. The narrator, an English schoolteacher, and his interior world of memories combine with the exterior world of the bleak Fenland landscape to produce a multiplicity of stories. Swift weaves together tales of empire building, land reclamation, brewers and lock-keepers to construct a chronicle that spans three centuries.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A picture of rural England

  • By Martin Minter on 01-11-16

Woven words

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-06-12

A richly vivid tapestry of images and characters, brought to life by a compelling reading, it's almost a long lyric poem.

4 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Beautiful Bird Songs from Around the World

  • By: The British Library
  • Narrated by: uncredited
  • Length: 2 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 2
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 2

This download showcases some of the most exquisite sounds that can be heard in the natural world, from the rich, melodious songs of the Blackbird, Pied Butcherbird and Nightingale that are full of complexity, ingenuity and perfectly arranged phrases, to the breathtaking compositions of the Skylark, Albert's Lyrebird and White-rumped Shama, and the rhythmical variations on a theme from the Chiming Wedgebill and White-browed Robin-chat.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent recording but...

  • By Mr on 30-05-11

Delight

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-01-11

These gorgeous sounds have delighted my teenage naturalist grandchild, and given my bored feline ecstasy on a boring gray winter day despite his puzzle that I can't help locate the songsters. A lasting pleasure for me too.

  • Duplicate Keys

  • By: Jane Smiley
  • Narrated by: Ruth Ann Phimister
  • Length: 11 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 6
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 1

Everyone has keys to Susan's New York apartment: all her friends, and friends of friends. So one afternoon, when Alice unlocks Susan's door to water the plants, she isn't surprised to find two men sitting in the living room. That they are both dead is a shock, however.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Disappointing

  • By Kellmorris on 20-04-07

Reflections

Overall
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-01-11

The only Jane Smiley I knew was her Thousand Acres. At first I was disappointed, but couldn't stop listening. Beautifully written of course, and in the end I find myself liking the author tremendously and grateful for all the surprising reflections that floated past me. The reading must have been very good as I didn't notice that there was anyone between me and the text!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Wolf Hall

  • By: Hilary Mantel
  • Narrated by: Simon Slater
  • Length: 24 hrs and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,646
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,695
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,698

Tudor England. Henry VIII is on the throne, but has no heir. Cardinal Wolsey is charged with securing his divorce. Into this atmosphere of distrust comes Thomas Cromwell - a man as ruthlessly ambitious in his wider politics as he is for himself. His reforming agenda is carried out in the grip of a self-interested parliament and a king who fluctuates between romantic passions and murderous rages.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Lose yourself in 16th century England

  • By Phil on 22-01-10

Listen and listen again

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-01-11

Immersion in the world of 16th century England has provided a wonderful depth to a time I thought I knew well. I don't think I would have read such a tome, despite the Booker and fulsome reviews, but as an audiobook I can indulge myself anywhere, anytime and will listen again when next I travel, and no doubt make new discoveries.

1 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • A Thousand Splendid Suns

  • By: Khaled Hosseini
  • Narrated by: Atossa Leoni
  • Length: 11 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,107
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 753
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 757

Born a generation apart and with very different ideas about love and family, Mariam and Laila are two women brought jarringly together by war, by loss, and by fate. As they endure the ever escalating dangers around them, in their home as well as in the streets of Kabul, they come to form a bond that makes them both sisters and mother-daughter to each other, and that will ultimately alter the course not just of their own lives but of the next generation.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Passionate story, passionless reading

  • By Siobhan on 31-07-07

For love of Afghanistan

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 14-03-09

I never thought those words could go together, 'love' and 'Afghanistan'. My sketchy knowledge from newspapers and images from television led me to want to look the other way, to know no more about a cruel, harsh environment that could only breed violence. The Kite Runner gave me some knowledge, a little more empathy; A Thousand Splendid Suns has drawn me in, as if Afghanistan is in some small way part of my own emotional life. I've hoped and despaired, feared and rejoiced, sometimes all at the same time, with Hosseini's Afghan women, and shared in their love for one another and for the children.
The continuing tragedy of Afghanistan has acquired another dimension for me, I can't look away.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The White Tiger

  • By: Aravind Adiga
  • Narrated by: Bindya Solanki
  • Length: 8 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 360
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 197
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 196

Balram Halwai is the White Tiger - the smartest boy in his village. Too poor to finish school, he has to work in a teashop until the day a rich man hires him as a chauffeur, and takes him to live in Delhi. The city is a revelation. Balram becomes aware of immense wealth all around him, and realizes the only way he can become part of it is by murdering his master. The White Tiger presents a raw and unromanticized India, both thrilling and shocking.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A fine Booker winner

  • By FJWynne on 28-12-08

True India

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 14-03-09

A magnificent tale, beginning in 'the darkness', deep interior India which provides the servants to the middle classes of Guragaon. The journey of the White Tiger is wonderfully vivid, from the coal fields of Bihar to the fairy-tale towers of Gurgaon, and on to twenty-first century Bangalore, each location drawn with brilliant and cruel accuracy, and each character with its real-life parallels. I'm not sure I'd give this to my friends whose lives are reflected here, the depictions of place and person are so close to the bone! Aravind Adiga does justice to the wonderful complexity of India.

9 of 13 people found this review helpful

  • War and Peace

  • By: Leo Tolstoy
  • Narrated by: Frederick Davidson
  • Length: 61 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 199
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 130
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 127

Often called the greatest novel ever written, War and Peace is at once an epic of the Napoleonic wars, a philosophical study, and a celebration of the Russian spirit. Tolstoy's genius is clearly seen in the multitude of characters in this massive chronicle, all of them fully realized and equally memorable.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I knew I'd never read it

  • By Judith on 09-08-08

I knew I'd never read it

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-08-08

As I'm nearly 70, I realised I'll never have time to read War and Peace. I'm now in the middle of listening to part 3, and enchanted. I didn't know it was full of irony and humour. the reading is perfect, for me, wonderfully camp. So I go on the bus with my Freedom pass, and when people ask me what music I have on my iPod I'm delighted to tell them that it's War and Peace!

42 of 42 people found this review helpful

The Time Traveler's Wife
    
    
        By:
        












    





    





    
        
            
            
                
            
        
        Audrey Niffenegger
    
    


    
    
        Narrated by:
        












    





    





    
        
            
            
                
            
        
        William Hope,
    
        
            
            
                
            
        
        Laurel Lefkow
    
    


    
    Length: 17 hrs and 44 mins
    1,110 ratings
    Overall 4.3
  • The Time Traveler's Wife

  • By: Audrey Niffenegger
  • Narrated by: William Hope, Laurel Lefkow
  • Length: 17 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,110
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 181
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 183

This extraordinary, magical novel is the story of Clare, a beautiful art student, and Henry, a librarian, who have known each other since Clare was six and Henry was 36, and were married when Clare was 22 and Henry 30. Impossible but true, because Henry has Chrono-Displacement Disorder: periodically his genetic clock resets and he finds himself misplaced in time, pulled to moments of emotional gravity in his past, present, and future.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Truly engrossing - couldn't put it down

  • By Wendy on 11-11-05

Poignant delight

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 28-08-06

The fantastic premise of this tale mirrors the uncertainties of love in this changing world, written with great intelligence and delightful literary allusion, I was enchanted, irritated, engrossed, curious, disappointed and sometimes confused - and always engrossed. The double narration is beautifully read.

  • Forgotten Voices of the Holocaust

  • By: Lyn Smith
  • Narrated by: Andrew Sachs
  • Length: 5 hrs and 10 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 26
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 15
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 15

Following the success of Forgotten Voices of the Great War, the series now chronicles one of human histories darkest hours. The author comes to the project following her significant work in recording the experiences of Holocaust survivors for the Imperial War Museum sound archive, one of the most important archives of its kind in the world. The intertwined moving and revealing interviews reveal the sheer complexity and horror of the Holocaust.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Poignant memories

  • By Judith on 11-04-06

Poignant memories

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-04-06

Audio is the right way to understand this book: the actual voices of the survivors telling their own stories have been woven together to tell the wider story of the Holocaust itself. The images and events evoked are heartbreaking, and yet the structure has made it possible to grasp the facts and feel addressed directly by the courageous men and women who've put their memories on record.

6 of 6 people found this review helpful

The Master
    
    
        By:
        












    





    





    
        
            
            
                
            
        
        Colm Toibin
    
    


    
    
        Narrated by:
        












    





    





    
        
            
            
                
            
        
        William Hope
    
    


    
    Length: 13 hrs and 45 mins
    20 ratings
    Overall 4.1
  • The Master

  • By: Colm Toibin
  • Narrated by: William Hope
  • Length: 13 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 20
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 5
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 5

The Master tells the story of Henry James, an American-born genius of the modern novel who becomes a connoisseur of exile, living among artists and aristocrats in Paris, Rome, Venice, and London. Colm Toibin captures the exquisite anguish of a man whose artistic gifts made his career a triumph but whose private life was haunted by loneliness and longing.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Masterly

  • By Judith on 11-04-06

Masterly

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-04-06

This is like hearing Henry James telling his own story: the care and clarity of language seem to be a compliment to the reader/listener, every word considered. Colm Toibin seems to have entered the mind of this strange man, and made both his life and his writing comprehensible.

6 of 6 people found this review helpful