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Gavin Morrice

Edinburgh, Scotland
  • 6
  • reviews
  • 6
  • helpful votes
  • 39
  • ratings
  • Applied Economics

  • Thinking Beyond Stage One
  • By: Thomas Sowell
  • Narrated by: Brian Emerson
  • Length: 7 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3

This book is geared to the average citizen with little or no economics background who would like the tools to think critically about economic issues. Many of today's economic issues are obscured by their inherent complexity and the often confusing and conflicting views coming from political talking heads. Sowell, a leading conservative economist and senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, seeks to alleviate this confusion.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Same old Sowell

  • By Gavin Morrice on 28-03-18

Same old Sowell

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 28-03-18

Thomas Sowell is brilliant, and this book is true to his usual style and quality.

However, most of the information here is a repeat of his other, larger books.

  • The Pleasure of Finding Things Out

  • The Best Short Works of Richard P. Feynman
  • By: Richard P. Feynman
  • Narrated by: Sean Runnette
  • Length: 8 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 165
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 146
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 140

The Pleasure of Finding Things Out is a magnificent treasury of the best short works of Richard P. Feynman, from interviews and speeches to lectures and printed articles. A sweeping, wide-ranging collection, it presents an intimate and fascinating view of a life in science - a life like no other. From his ruminations on science in our culture to his Nobel Prize acceptance speech, this book will delight anyone interested in the world of ideas.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • All you want to hear is already in the first book.

  • By Fritz on 07-01-17

Delightful insight into a brilliant mind

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 29-01-18

This book is a collection of interviews and talks by Feynman. These talks give an insight into the brilliant mind of one of the 20th century’s most notable scientists.

Feynman was irreverent, playful, curious, and honest. A great role model for any curious person!

The talks are well curated and organised, and the narration is very close to Feynman’s own communication style...okay?

An enjoyable listen while out walking.

  • Debt - Updated and Expanded

  • The First 5,000 Years
  • By: David Graeber
  • Narrated by: Grover Gardner
  • Length: 17 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 139
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 126
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 124

Here, anthropologist David Graeber presents a stunning reversal of conventional wisdom: He shows that before there was money, there was debt. For more than 5,000 years, since the beginnings of the first agrarian empires, humans have used elaborate credit systems to buy and sell goods - that is, long before the invention of coins or cash. It is in this era, Graeber argues, that we also first encounter a society divided into debtors and creditors.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Looking for economic and social clarity?

  • By John Hodgson on 29-05-17

Stopped before the end

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 16-01-18

This book contains some interesting info about various cultures, at various points in history.

But the author’s narrative is misleading and revisionist.

For example, in one chapter he describes communism simply as the notion of sharing with others. In another chapter, he attempts to conflate capitalism with corruption, defining capitalism as when a merchant tries to influence governments to put limitations on the market in the capitalists favour.

For such a long and arduous book, I’d really expect more substance than this book offers.

2 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • When Will Jesus Bring the Pork Chops?

  • By: George Carlin
  • Narrated by: George Carlin
  • Length: 7 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 66
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 48
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 46

Following his two New York Times best sellers, Brain Droppings and Napalm & Silly Putty, comes George Carlin's third audiobook, When Will Jesus Bring the Pork Chops?, a riotous journey through the mind of one of America's premiere comic observers.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The funniest man to ever live.

  • By Jason.W on 02-08-17

Carlin, but not at his best

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-11-17

I’m a huge fan of Carlin but this is not his best work.

He stoops down to a lot of crass toilet humour in this book; most of it not funny enough to be justified. There are sections that are surrealist, which is never really Carlin’s strong suit, and felt like new material that he would try out on a Wednesday night in a bar, rather than a book.

The best part about this book is Carlin’s analysis of language, which has always been one of his strongest areas. Throughout the book there’s a recurring theme of euphemistic language, which is funny, enjoyable, and thought provoking.

Not a bad book, but not a good place to start with George Carlin.

  • Jobs to Be Done

  • A Roadmap for Customer-Centered Innovation
  • By: Stephen Wunker, Jessica Wattman, David Farber
  • Narrated by: Tim Andres Pabon
  • Length: 4 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 9
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 7
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 7

Jobs to Be Done gives you a clear-cut framework for thinking about your business, outlines a road map for discovering new markets, new products, and new services, and helps you generate creative opportunities to innovate your way to success.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Doesn’t work well on audio

  • By Gavin Morrice on 28-09-17

Doesn’t work well on audio

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 28-09-17

I’m a big fan of the JtbD methodology, and was really looking forward to learning more from this book.

Unfortunately, the writing style really does not lend itself well to the audio format.

The narrator does a good job of working through what were often dry lists of key points.

I would recommend you seek out a paper copy of this book.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Seeing What Others Don't

  • The Remarkable Ways We Gain Insights
  • By: Gary Klein
  • Narrated by: Christopher Lane
  • Length: 9 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 55
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 47
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 46

Insights—like Darwin's understanding of the way evolution actually works, and Watson and Crick's breakthrough discoveries about the structure of DNA-can change the world. We also need insights into the everyday things that frustrate and confuse us so that we can more effectively solve problems and get things done. Yet we know very little about when, why, or how insights are formed—or what blocks them. In Seeing What Others Don't, renowned cognitive psychologist Gary Klein unravels the mystery.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Insightful! A great overview of the workings of insights

  • By Gavin Morrice on 04-12-15

Insightful! A great overview of the workings of insights

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-12-15

I purchased this book expecting it to be a practical guide for increasing the rate of insights I have, at work and otherwise.

This book is not a how-to guide.

Nonetheless, I found it very informative, well narrated, and I learned a lot from each of the anecdotes shared. I can't help but feel that by expanding my world view, even just slightly, this book has inadvertently provided me with more tools to help me get ahead in every day life.

Would recommend.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful