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Zara

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  • 4
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  • Bullshit Jobs

  • By: David Graeber
  • Narrated by: Christopher Ragland
  • Length: 12 hrs and 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 118
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 105
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 104

Penguin presents the audiobook edition of Bullshit Jobs by David Graeber, read by Christopher Ragland. Back in 1930, the economist John Maynard Keynes prophesied that by the century's end, technology would see us all working 15-hour weeks. But instead, something curious happened. Today, average working hours have not decreased but increased. And now, across the developed world, three-quarters of all jobs are in services or admin, jobs that don't seem to add anything to society: bullshit jobs. 

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Read the original essay

  • By Amazon Customer on 12-07-18

Entertaining, Insightful, and a damn good read

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-01-19

Really amazing. Delves into so many different fields. While still managing to remain grounded in the human experience.

First few chapters can be a little slow at times. While Graeber lays down the framework of bullshit jobs. But overall the whole book is really riveting. The last few chapters especially are mind blowing.

  • Broadcast

  • By: Liam Brown
  • Narrated by: Oliver Thorne
  • Length: 5 hrs and 59 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 6
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 6

Inception meets Black Mirror for the YouTube generation. The idea behind MindCast is simple. We insert a small chip into your skull and then every thought, every feeling, every memory is streamed live, 24 hours a day. Trust me - within a few months you'll be the most talked about person on the planet. When David Callow is offered the lead role in a revolutionary new online show, he snatches the opportunity. Rapidly becoming a viral sensation, David is propelled to stratospheric levels of celebrity. However, he soon realises the downside of sharing every secret with the world....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent

  • By C E. Moss on 17-11-18

I enjoyed it

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 24-10-18

A fun listen. Narration was brilliant. The story was interesting, I found the characters to be a little weak. I didn't feel super invested in them or there relationships with each other. Despite that, The concept was really cool. And I remained pretty hooked to the end.

(Kinda spoilers warning)

More than anything the strongest part of the book was the atmosphere, it all came together really nicely. The last bit got really weird and changed tonally in a big way, but kind of in a good way. Felt like a bit of a fever dream. Ending open to interpretation.

(Definitely spoilers warning)

I felt a little drained when I'd finished. As a leftist, the continued ramping up of corporatism and commodification was pretty horrifying. What was really horrible though was the emotional abuse the character suffered in the second half. The way Alices character just suddenly tonally shifted at the end was bizzare. Made me not sure how to read those scenes. Not sure if the Author was going for uncanny valley or just utter hopelessness. I felt both.

One thing that really stuck with me was a lack of any strong opposition to the despicable Zan. David has to have everything explained to him and is constantly reacting, he basically has no agency for the whole book. The sheep guy trys to do something but hes violent towards David who is in many ways a victim. And is quickly dealt with.

I had Alice pegged as the revolutionary, the moral fibre of the story in a story devoid of any others. But she turned at the end in such a bizarre fashion that it felt dreamlike. The public are painted as mindless consumers. The book ends so devoid of hope.

Anyway this was basically just very tired ramblings. Really enjoyed the book, made me feel a lot of things. Thanks for writing it!

  • Espedair Street

  • By: Iain Banks
  • Narrated by: Peter Kenny
  • Length: 8 hrs and 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 70
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 67
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 66

Daniel Weir used to be a famous - not to say infamous - rock star. Maybe still is. At thirty-one he has been both a brilliant failure and a dull success. He's made a lot of mistakes that have paid off and a lot of smart moves he'll regret forever (however long that turns out to be). Daniel Weir has gone from rags to riches and back, and managed to hold onto them both, though not much else. His friends all seem to be dead, fed up with him or just disgusted - and who can blame them? And now Daniel Weir is all alone.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Breathtaking

  • By Zara on 14-05-17

Breathtaking

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 14-05-17

The plot is interesting, the characters engaging and the quality of the writing and narrating excellent.

But more than all that it perfectly illustrates the anxiety and pain one can feel as a result of there appearance, upbringing and life choices.

It made me feel less alone and more capable while providing a thoroughly enjoyable story.

Bravo mr Banks

3 of 3 people found this review helpful