LISTENER

Yeh C.

  • 12
  • reviews
  • 4
  • helpful votes
  • 35
  • ratings
  • The Great Leveler

  • Violence and the History of Inequality from the Stone Age to the Twenty-First Century
  • By: Walter Scheidel
  • Narrated by: Joel Richards
  • Length: 17 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 24
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 23
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 23

Are mass violence and catastrophes the only forces that can seriously decrease economic inequality? To judge by thousands of years of history, the answer is yes. Tracing the global history of inequality from the Stone Age to today, Walter Scheidel shows that inequality never dies peacefully. Inequality declines when carnage and disaster strike and increases when peace and stability return. The Great Leveler is the first book to chart the crucial role of violent shocks in reducing inequality over the full sweep of human history around the world.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Looked very promising but then disappointing

  • By Ras on 28-11-17

Takes a grim view of inequality

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 18-01-19

Throughout history, inequality is only compacted by massive violent shocks, such as state collapse, epidemics, revolutions and mass mobilisation warfare, and the author gives the few examples throughout history where this happened. The author also looks at other factors that can compact inequality such as civil wars and policy decisions, and concludes these does not reduce inequality in the long run.

Overall the outlook on reducing inequality in our current age is pretty grim, as the four horsemen is the apocalypse are no longer applicable. An easy read for anyone interested

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Other People's Money

  • The Real Business of Finance
  • By: John Kay
  • Narrated by: Walter Dixon
  • Length: 11 hrs and 54 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 69
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 64
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 64

The finance sector of Western economies is too large and attracts too many of the smartest college graduates. Financialization over the past three decades has created a structure that lacks resilience and supports absurd volumes of trading. The finance sector devotes too little attention to the search for new investment opportunities and the stewardship of existing ones, and far too much to secondary-market dealing in existing assets. Regulation has contributed more to the problems than the solutions.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • My View

  • By Amazon Customer on 07-01-16

Excellent

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 16-01-19

Comprehensive review of what is wrong with our finance sector today, of excessive financialisation and what can be done about it

  • Capitalism Without Capital

  • The Rise of the Intangible Economy
  • By: Jonathan Haskel, Stian Westlake
  • Narrated by: Derek Perkins
  • Length: 8 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 46
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 39
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 38

Early in the 21st century, a quiet revolution occurred. For the first time, the major developed economies began to invest more in intangible assets, like design, branding, R&D, or software, than in tangible assets, like machinery, buildings, and computers. For all sorts of businesses, from tech firms and pharma companies to coffee shops and gyms, the ability to deploy assets that one can neither see nor touch is increasingly the main source of long-term success.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Repetitive and disappointing

  • By grimnortherner on 23-04-18

Excellent!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-03-18

The author excellent describes how intangible assets have become more important in the economies of developed nations, and how individuals, businesses and public institutions might respond to the challenges.

The layout is clearly structured and the authors are very knowledgeable in economics and related fields, and the audiobook is narrated by the always excellent Derek Perkins. Highly recommended

  • Made in Britain

  • How the Nation Earns Its living
  • By: Evan Davis
  • Narrated by: Evan Davis
  • Length: 7 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 123
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 52
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 53

Looking at how Britain pays its way in the world today. Like Andrew Marr’s History of Modern Britain or Michael Palin’s Himalaya, the book will have a coherence and life beyond the television series, looking at some issues in greater depth, and telling additional stories to illustrate some of the ideas. This book is about the things that Britain produces in order to pay its way in the world, from physical goods that we can see and feel, to intangible services that are much harder to quantify.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The UK's Income Explained!

  • By Savvyman on 19-10-11

Excellent introduction in the evolution of the British economy

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 25-02-18

Evan Davis excellently narrates the evolution of the British economy from the past to the present, using examples of real British firms such as BAE system, ARM holding and Brompton bicycles as sources of innovation and how our economy can be improved upon.

  • A Classical Education

  • The Stuff You Wish You'd been Taught at School
  • By: Caroline Taggart
  • Narrated by: Bill Wallis
  • Length: 4 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 335
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 204
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 199

Is the Greek alphabet all Greek to you? Is geometry your Achilles heel and does your knowledge of Homer have more to do with The Simpsons than the Sirens? From engineering and architecture to drama and democracy, the world around us is founded on the principles and discoveries of the Ancient World, yet our understanding of it is episodic at best. But it's never too late to learn....

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Light but not insubstantial

  • By catherine on 01-12-10

Excellent narrator to an enjoyable book

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 22-02-18

An excellent short introduction to the subjects comprising the classics including Philosophy, Language, Science and the Arts. This was made all the more enjoyable by the impeccable narrator Bill Wallis

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Politics: A Very Short Introduction

  • By: Kenneth Minogue
  • Narrated by: Eric Martin
  • Length: 4 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 8
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 7
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 7

In this provocative but balanced audiobook, Kenneth Minogue discusses the development of politics from the ancient world to the twentieth century. He prompts us to consider why political systems evolve, how politics offers both power and order in our society, whether democracy is always a good thing, and what future politics may have in the twenty-first century.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent book, didn't like the narration.

  • By Amazon Customer on 12-07-18

Great insight into workings of politics

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-02-18

The author explains how politics came about, how we are affected and attempts of past generations to create an idealised society. Great for an initial understanding of politics

  • The Establishment

  • And How They Get Away With It
  • By: Owen Jones
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Keeble
  • Length: 14 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,383
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,248
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,233

Behind our democracy lurks a powerful but unaccountable network of people who wield massive power and reap huge profits in the process. In exposing this shadowy and complex system that dominates our lives, Owen Jones sets out on a journey into the heart of our Establishment, from the lobbies of Westminster to the newsrooms, boardrooms, and trading rooms of Fleet Street and the City.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Won't do your blood pressure any good....

  • By Colin on 11-04-17

Insight into workings of the British elite

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-01-18

Good description of how British elites use their influence to preserve power, and descriptions of how to counter it

  • Your Deceptive Mind: A Scientific Guide to Critical Thinking Skills

  • By: Steven Novella, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Steven Novella
  • Length: 12 hrs and 39 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 621
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 544
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 519

No skill is more important in today's world than being able to think about, understand, and act on information in an effective and responsible way. What's more, at no point in human history have we had access to so much information, with such relative ease, as we do in the 21st century. But because misinformation out there has increased as well, critical thinking is more important than ever. These 24 rewarding lectures equip you with the knowledge and techniques you need to become a savvier, sharper critical thinker in your professional and personal life.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent but listen like a true sceptic

  • By Peter on 22-03-16

Enlightened counterweight to biases of the mind

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 13-12-17

Excellent insight into the biases your mind operates on, and how critical thinking can overcome them

  • The Italian Renaissance

  • By: Kenneth R. Bartlett, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Kenneth R. Bartlett
  • Length: 18 hrs and 17 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 77
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 69
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 69

The effects of the Italian Renaissance are still with us today, from the incomparable paintings of Leonardo da Vinci to the immortal writings of Petrarch and Machiavelli. But why was there such an artistic, cultural, and intellectual explosion in Italy at the start of the 14th century? Why did it occur in Italy? And why in certain Italian city-states such as Florence? Professor Bartlett probes these questions and more in 36 dynamic lectures.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Gripping

  • By mr on 29-12-14

Stunning insight into ideas and the renaissance

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 17-10-17

To understand the how the arts during the Renaissance came about, one must understand the social, economic and political changes that came about during that time. And this is what Professor Barnett performed so eloquently on.

The courses are concise with excellent accompanying notes in PDF, and the speeches so refined that you will want to come back to it again and again

  • Music as a Mirror of History

  • By: Robert Greenberg, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Robert Greenberg
  • Length: 18 hrs and 16 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 49
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 48
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 47

In Music as a Mirror of History, Great Courses favorite Professor Greenberg of San Francisco Performances returns with a fascinating and provocative premise: Despite the abstractness and the universality of music - and our habit of listening to it divorced from any historical context - music is a mirror of the historical setting in which it was created. Music carries a rich spectrum of social, cultural, historical, and philosophical information, all grounded in the life and experience of the composer.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Thoughly Enjoyable listening experience

  • By BlueStraggler on 22-06-18

Wonderful storytelling of events related to music

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 17-10-17

Professor Greenberg is a wonderful lecturer and tells the sorry of the music as related to historical events. This is more a history course than music theory, but wonderful nonetheless