LISTENER

So Super Awesome

  • 13
  • reviews
  • 39
  • helpful votes
  • 92
  • ratings

Uplifting (don't say empowering!) and fun

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 27-11-18

I agree with another reviewer that the delivery (at first) seems strangely flat, but I guess it's just because we're used to seeing Jo Brand in stand-up or in less scripted programs - I soon got used to her 'reading voice' and really enjoyed this book, I had more laugh out loud moments than I can remember having with any other audiobook, and also thought there was lots of good advice. Advice sounds too serious - but a good attitude to life that leaves you feeling positive and empathetic to yourself and others :)

4 people found this helpful

Favourite author

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-10-18

I have enjoyed listening to all Liane Moriarty's books, and though would not choose this as my favourite, I thought the central idea very interesting, and the parts that another reviewer said were a bit too farcical a great idea for a movie - so am pleased to see that it is in fact being turned into one by Nicole Kidman! I also thought the interwoven reflections on current social trends and pressures etc a good addition to the storyline, and hope these are handled well in the film version. Can't say I noticed Caroline Lee reading slowly as other reviewers have said, and I'm glad she reads all Liane Moriarty's books :)

7 people found this helpful

Sooo good

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-09-18

One of the best audio books I've listened to, original story line, keeps you guessing, brilliant narration.

Pleased to see 11 more books by this author on Audible to try!

11 people found this helpful

Brilliantly written

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 26-04-18

Of course this book is devastating, but it is brilliantly written by Gemma Dowler and read flawlessly by Ruby Thomas.

I hope more research can be done into psychopathy and any preventative measures that might be taken, to protect the world from it in the future.

Almost as good as The Child

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 22-04-18

I listened to Fiona Barton's second book, The Child, first, which I thought had a better story as it kept you guessing and surprised you more. I didn't find the story as good here, though the main character was interesting and read very well by Claire Corbett.

Perfect for an audiobook

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 20-04-18

Perfect for an audiobook, well read and interesting, but not so detailed that you have to concentrate too hard - easy listening.

Brilliant

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 15-04-18

Clever thought-provoking book, superbly read by a very talented narrator. Will be hunting for books read by Adjoa Andoh!

Brilliant, unique book

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-04-18

Something different, an incredible biography about someone not usually in the public eye. Very well written by Sarah Krasnostein - seamlessly mixing past and present - and brilliantly narrated, I really enjoyed Rachel Tidd's different Australian accented voices :)

Irritating narration of female characters!

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-04-18

Is it just me, or is the way female characters are often narrated in a breathy, whispery voice by male narrators quite unbearable!? I understand it must be difficult to create a voice that can be differentiated from the other characters - quite a skill for one narrator to create so many recognisable voices in a story - but for me it really takes away from the strength of the female characters. In this story the main female character is of course suffering and at times very ill, so a weakened voice would be understandable, but all the same, the male characters don't seem to get the same breathy treatment in periods of illness as she does through out the book... Anyhow I'm sure Gita was a strong character, and I'm glad Lale and Gita Sokolov's story has been told.

Good, important book

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 22-03-18

This book is well written and informative - both in the wider sense and to have such an honest personal account.

It's always tricky reviewing books that are about difficult subjects because you don't want to use words like 'enjoyed', but I do want to say that I found Helen's narration very good and easy to listen to - I wish she could start a side career as an audiobook narrator! I also want to say that I found her story, though sad, very.. 'gripping'? This is the wrong word, but I disagree with a reviewer who read the paper version on Amazon who felt that there was too much detail and that the story could have been kept shorter. The fact that Helen has so many letters that she can quote word for word, for me really gave an insight into how relationships like these can work, more so than just hearing a summary of someone's story only in their own words.

I bought this book after hearing Helen on the Standard Issue podcast and am glad I did.

4 people found this helpful