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Norma Miles

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  • From Twisted Roots

  • Thriller, Horror, and Mystery Short Stories
  • By: S.H. Cooper
  • Narrated by: Paul Jenkins
  • Length: 7 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 1
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 1

You'll experience intimate firsthand accounts of modern day murders, kidnappings, and violent revenge. Other stories are heartwarming with whimsical mysteries, gothic fairy tales, and supernatural monstrosities. Nothing is as it seems; nothing is safe; and anything is possible as you embark upon these thrilling tales to uncover the truth.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I don't ever answer the door anymore.

  • By Norma Miles on 17-10-18

I don't ever answer the door anymore.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 17-10-18

This collection of twenty four well written short stories explores different aspects of horror and mysteries, not just the 'bump in the night' scary story (although there are those here, too, but the really terrifying 'what happened next?' type, as in the sweet turning sinister, Smidge, and the social and psychological horror which descends on a family through no fault of their own, in Aftermath of a Murder. Some are heartwarming, like Fran and Jock, others more traditionally creepy, as in As Long as there were children. Not one could be described as boring, each quickly drawing in the reader with tentacles of expectations.
The narrator fully does justice to each and every one. A pleasantly normal voice, reading with moderate pace, clarity and good intonation, the warmth of Paul Jenkins' narration contrasts with the often strangeness or bewilderment or fear inherent in the text, and so enhances it. A good, steady performance.

My thanks to the rights holder of From Twisted Roots who, at my request, freely gifted me a complimentary copy, via Audiobook Boom. Usually, I prefer to read a book straight through with as few pauses as possible. With this one, however, I felt that several of the stories deserved time for reflection and so spread the reading over several days. A fine collection, and recommended.

  • The Far Journey

  • A Timeslip Novel of Survival on the Oregon Trail
  • By: Tom Reppert
  • Narrated by: Patricia Santomasso
  • Length: 10 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 2
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 2
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 2

Young, sharp-tongued Paula Masters, used to her cell phones, cherry lattes and designer jeans, suddenly finds herself thrust back in time to 1848 and the Oregon Trail. In modern life, she rebels against the curfews and restrictions of her day, seeing them as unfair hardships. But now in this alien world with its buffalo stampedes, wild Indians, and deadly pestilence, she is about to find out what real hardships are.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • We are the hardship generation.

  • By Norma Miles on 16-10-18

We are the hardship generation.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 16-10-18

After reading the opening chapters of The Far Journey, this reader thought she had made a mistake in selecting the book. How wrong! It continued to become an emotional roller coaster, a presentation of an historical period which threw the reader into the place and time like no other. And it was because of the main character's unique view - the past, experienced by a very modern young girl. It's time travel with a difference.

Paula Masters, sixteen, was a rich kid. She used to be a grade A student and was already getting recognition for her riding prowess. Then her horse died, her parents divorced, and she became a self pitying, unkind, attention seeking, self satisfying lazy teen, a liar and manipulator whose only saving grace was her love for her little Downs Syndrome brother. Saved from school expulsion only by the threats to sue by her lawyer mother, she knows that she can still expect parental punishment, so, when she passes out at her little brother's birthday party and wakes up, in considerable pain in what looks like a reinactment camp for wayward kids, she's not surprised. Just horrified that her mother would do this to her. It's horrible. No hospitals, no conurbations, no doctors, no medicines, no communications, no WiFi , no T.V., no railway, no roads - just wagons travelling through open land, the constant fear of, well, everything, from storms and mud, heat and cold, injury, disease and hunger. And Indians. A modern day girl stuck in the 1800s on a 2000+ mile journey through constantly hostile lands.

The narration by Patricia Santomasso has good pacing, individually voiced protagonists and she really becomes Paula, later to be Libby, the main protagonist and story teller. So much so, this reader forgot that she was listening to a narration and simply became absorbed into the book. A fine performance.

This book is fantastic, vital, alive and often heartbreaking, a picture of real people patiently trying to find a new life, all seen through the eyes of someone who had everything then had it all taken away to become one of them. I don't have words to give sufficient praise. A must for everyone if only to show how very lucky we all are.

  • Lieutenant Henry Gallant

  • The Henry Gallant Saga, Book 2
  • By: H. Peter Alesso
  • Narrated by: Theo Copeland
  • Length: 7 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 2
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2

In an era of genetic engineering, Lieutenant Henry Gallant is the only Natural (non-genetically enhanced) officer left in the fleet. In spite of his superiors' concerns that he is not up to the challenge, his unique mental abilities have proven essential to the defense of the United Planets in its fight against the Titan invaders. Gallant allies himself with Alaina Hepburn, the leader of the democratic opposition. With Alaina's help, he discovers that the ancient AI has a sinister ulterior motive and he must match his exceptional mind against the complexity of machine intelligence to escape the ultimate trap and prevent the extermination of humanity. 

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Don't cry for me Alaina.

  • By Norma Miles on 16-10-18

Don't cry for me Alaina.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 16-10-18

An exciting story with complex ideas, told in simple terms.
Henry Gallant is the only non genetically enhanced human aboard the United Planet's revalutionary ship, Intrepid, on it's maiden voyage to Tao-Ceti and fuelled by dark matter. Gallant, because of his difference, was suspected and rejected by many of the crew but slowly had begun to gain respect and seniority. However, a surprise attack by a Titan Destroyer Class ship as they approached the second of five plants in the system, left Intrepid badly damaged, her crew severely reduced and her amiable Captain dead, to be succeeded by the XO, Anton Neuman, a man with no liking for Gallant. And the feeling was reciprocated: when they returned to Earth, Neuman was to marry the woman with whom Gallant had fallen in love.
Tau Beta, the second planet, is earthlike and, surprisingly, inhabited by humans. How had they arrived there? But there was the possibility of restoring Intrepid before the Titan ship returned, the only hope, in fact, so Gallant was sent down to make it happen.

With plenty of fighting action spread through the body of the book, there is also intrigue and betrayal, the whispers of a new romance, and philosophical discussions with an egotistical AI. It all makes for an excellent story. The only downside is the lack of character development: the protagonists, especially Gallant himself, remain two dimensional despite this being the second book in the series. Some of this is mitigated by the narration of Theo Copeland, who reads with clarity and expression, pacing his delivery with the text, his voicings of all the characters distinctive and individual. A nice performance.

My thanks to the rights holder of Lieutenant Henry Gallant, who, at my request, freely gifted me a complimentary copy of the book, via Audiobook Boom. Although the second in the Gallant saga, this book is fully stand alone, any necessary background information covered in this volume. Recommended to anyone who enjoys a good SF story with battle detail, interesting ideas and good world building.

  • Lady Justice on the Dark Side

  • By: Robert Thornhill
  • Narrated by: George Kuch
  • Length: 4 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 1
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 1

After five years on the police force, a bullet in the kiester from a vengeful gangbanger convinces Walt that it’s time to turn in his badge. Walt realizes once again that retirement just isn’t his cup of tea and, with a little urging from his brother-in-law, decides to become a private investigator. For five years he had served the Lady Justice wearing a white robe and a blindfold and followed the rules, but he soon discovered that the P.I. business was leading him across the line.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • To protect and serve.

  • By Norma Miles on 14-10-18

To protect and serve.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 14-10-18

Narrator George Kuch returns again as Walt Williams, at a new turning point in his life. After five years with the police in the special unit C.R.A.P., Walt, from his hospital bed recovering from a gunshot wound taken in the line of duty, decides to keep his promise to his wife, Maggie, and retire. He is, after all, 70 years of age and she wants to be able to enjoy some quality years with him - they've only been married for four rather danger filled years.
But Walt is bored and starts helping his brother in law in his P.I. business. But there is a dilemma for him to face - the way that a P.I. conducts business is often very different from the police procedure, where everything has to be undertaken with caution and the careful preservation of lines of evidence. It might get the job done more efficiently, but is it right to break in and search a suspect's home, even take away evidence from it, without the sanctity of a warrant? And what is justice, anyway?

This is easy to listen, George Kuch's performance, as ever, perfectly capturing the spirit of Walt Williams as he relates his stories and inner troublings. This fun but serious story by Robert Thornhill in his marvellous Lady Justice series again presents the reader with important ideas to ponder, not only about justice itself but also changes in society over the past seventy years. Characterisation is excellent, the protagonists are real people, good, bad and sometimes irritating, the ideas are considered from all sides and the tone still remains light despite the depth of subject matter. Marvellous.

The books are all stand alone and can be read in any order. It is always a pleasure to meet again with querky old friends in the series: and Walt has a lot of friends.
Highly recommended

  • Case of the Fleet-Footed Mummy

  • Corgi Case Files, Volume 2
  • By: Jeffrey M. Poole
  • Narrated by: Bob Johnson
  • Length: 5 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 1
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 1

When a traveling Egyptian exhibit stops in picturesque Pomme Valley, all hell breaks loose when a valuable artifact is stolen and a dead body turns up in an unexpected location. The prime suspect has already been identified, but there's a catch: He's more than 3,000 years old. Pomme Valley's newest crime-fighting crusaders are on the case with Sherlock, new packmate Watson, and their reluctant human, Zack. Can they solve the murder and locate the missing loot before any more misfortune can befall the town?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Dude, someone stole our pendant.

  • By Norma Miles on 11-10-18

Dude, someone stole our pendant.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-10-18

When Zach Anderson inherited an house and vineyard in Pomme Valley, he found himself accused of robbery and murder but a recent and reluctantly acquired corgi helped prove his innocence and led to a friendship with Vance, one of the local police. He named the dog Sherlock. Now, having endeared himself to the residents of the small town by throwing a party and plying the guests with bottles of wine from his store (ironically, he does not like wine himself), he's settled in and now has another dog, Watson, even though she's female.
Festival time has arrived in Pomme Valley and the local high school is hosting an Egyptian exhibition but on the opening night, when the grand reveal of the sarcophagus takes place, the mummy is gone and so, too, is a priceless pendant. It looked like the mummy had taken it!

The Case of the Fleet-Footed Mummy is the second in this delicious series about the somewhat shy but irascible newcomer to Pomme Valley, and Sher!ock, the corgi who lives up to his namesake's reputation. Wonderfully written with whit and full of fun, occasionally laugh out loud, as the rather private Zach keeps getting pulled into close encounters with his small town neighbours.I

Told in the first person from Zach's perspective, narrator Bob Johnson again perfectly assumes the persona of the reluctant sleuth, his pleasant and well paced reading conveying his sometimes forgetfulness and his opinions of people and places, including an annoying little voice in his head.. Mr. Johnson also gives all the other protagonists very distinctive and appropriate voices, too, infusing each with a further hint of life over and above that already written in by the author. A really sound performance.

i am not usually a fan of animal centred stories but this book is solid, lighthearted fun with a personable and well developed main character. My thanks to the rights holder who, at my request, freely gifted me a complimentary copy, via Audiobook Boom. I am rapidly becoming a fan of this series as related by the excellent Mr.Johnson and hope there will be more to come.
Recommended.

  • Points of Impact

  • Frontlines, Book 6
  • By: Marko Kloos
  • Narrated by: Luke Daniels
  • Length: 8 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 103
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 96
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 95

Earth's armed forces have stopped the Lanky advance and chased their ships out of the solar system, but for CDC officer Andrew Grayson, the war feels anything but won. On Mars, the grinding duty of flushing out the twenty-meter-tall alien invaders from their burrows underground is wearing down troops and equipment at an alarming rate. And for the remaining extrasolar colonies, the threat of a Lanky attack is ever present.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • See you on the other side

  • By Norma Miles on 11-10-18

See you on the other side

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-10-18

This is the sixth (but still standalone) book in the excellent Frontlines military S.F.series which has followed the life of Andrew Grayson from his signing up to escape the poverty and hopelessness of the earth ghetto where he grew up, and the promise of real food that the military received, through training, marriage, horrendous battles against an almost unassailable alien enemy, promotions and now the ongoing slog of trying to eliminate the remaining Lankie's on Mars. Earth hadn't lost the war three years before but they hadn't won it either. The threat still remained. Ten years after their youthful enlistments, Andrew is now captain and his pilot wife, Halley, a major but time together is rare and measured in days only.
Earth has finally pooled it's resources to build a new bigger, better ship, the hope for the future. But ten years has taken it's toll on Andrew, he's tired, burdened by the responsibilities of command, and haunted by guilts over things he has done. He's war weary, no longer the idealistic young man of the past. And on now to another new assignment...

This story lacks some of the exhilaration of earlier books, echoing Andrew's own disillusionment, although the battle scenes later in the book are as vibrantly written as ever, forming clear pictures in the mind. Author Marko Kloos' clear and direct style of writing carries all that Andrew see and does and feels directly to the reader, from the terrors of battle to the momentary quietness of brief periods spent hiking through countryside with his wife and the taste of that special cup of coffee. With good dialogue too, it all feels so terrifyingly real.
The whole is further enhanced by the excellent narration of Luke Daniels. The voice of Andrew, he also becomes everyone else with his ability to give seperate and appropriate voices to all of the protagonists, all well cadenced and emotionally tied to the text. A Stirling performance, as always.

Perhaps Points of Impact is not as battle action packed as previous books in the series, but it is nevertheless far superior to most other military S.F.books around, maturing the character of Andrew.as he meets the occasional old friend and enemy, and still survives after ten years of service when so many of his entry time have died.
The whole Frontlines series is highly recommended, this book included, especially in the audio format.
Simply brilliant.

  • A Case Of Murder

  • Kendall, Volume 6
  • By: Mr John Holt
  • Narrated by: Peter John Borys
  • Length: 8 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 1
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1

Whittaker passed the drinks over. “Anyway, it seems that he’s got himself into a bit of bother,” he continued. “A very serious bit of bother.” “Bother?” repeated Kendall. Whittaker heaved a sigh. “Yes you know,” he replied. “Trouble.” Kendall nodded. “Oh trouble, I get you,” he said. “So what sort of bother are we talking about?” Whittaker took another drink. “Well it’s a case of murder I’m afraid.”

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Tea and chocolate biscuits.

  • By Norma Miles on 09-10-18

Tea and chocolate biscuits.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-10-18

Before beginning, I have to confess: I am a big fan of Mr.Holt's writing. Not, perhaps, a style to everyone's taste but he makes it all feel very real.
Kendall, an American P.I., and his assistant, the marvellous Molly, are in London to give evidence in a trial and snatch a second holiday at the same time, when he is approached by a Chief Inspector well known to him. The policeman asks for his help. His cousin has been arrested for a murder in Ireland which he claims he did not commit. Would Kendall, please, look into it for him.
Naturally, Kendall is both reluctant and sceptical, but, as so often happens, he is persuaded into it by Molly and the pair arrive in a small Irish village, meeting the locals and very much enjoying the chocolate biscuit hospitality whilst Kendall half heartedly at first begins to look for clues as to what exactly happened.

The characterisations are good, the pace slow and comfortable,. Kendall is a bit of a cummudgeon, but Molly keeps him nicely in hand. He might say he believes that there is no such thing as coincidence, but it's really Kendal he actually believes in, and once again it's Molly's promptings that gets him to get things done.
The book is a delight, good adventure, great story and an excellent narrator in Peter John Body's, whose reading is excellent, his characterisation of Kendall himself absolutely spot on and who voices the other protagonists individually also. A good performance. My only criticism of the book is an editting problem, with short but uneccessary periods of repetition which occur in several places throughout the story.
Nevertheless, a book to be savoured and enjoyed, with glimpses of the beautiful Irish coast and Irish hospitality.

  • Lady Justice and the Magic Dragon

  • By: Robert Thornhill
  • Narrated by: George Kuch
  • Length: 4 hrs and 8 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2

Three children - an eight-year-old boy and two six-year-old girls - see violence so terrifying that they retreat into the magical, make-believe world of Puff the Magic Dragon, where they feel safe and secure. Private investigator Walt Williams teams up with Lady Justice and Puff to protect the kids from vicious muggers, an abusive husband, and a sexual predator. Once again, justice is served when Walt and his senior sidekicks come to the rescue. A story filled with fears, tears, laughter, and hope.  

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Why was the snowman rummaging through the carrots?

  • By Norma Miles on 09-10-18

Why was the snowman rummaging through the carrots?

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-10-18

... He was picking his nose.
Corny, yes, but that's the trademark of Jerry, one of Walt's old friends.

For those unfamiliar with this fabulous series, Walt Williams is a retired realtor who joined the police when in his 60s. Now he is retired again to run his own PI firm with his brother in law, both 'grey haired old gumshoes' in their 70s. But don't underestimate the elderly. As he says, 'You don't want to make old people mad. They don't like being old in the first place."
The brilliance of this series, besides the excellent characterisation of Walt and his various friends, is Robert Thornhill's ability to take controversial subjects, build great detective stories around them often highlighting both sides of the issues, and inject a good helping of humour (and that doesn't include Jerry's jokes) to lighten the situations. The stories make the reader think, but so effortlessly, and then come to their own decisions. This time the focus is on Medicare and drug abuse and the effects of family violence, especially on the children. Always well researched and informative, every book in this series is superb - and, surprisingly, lots of fun.

The books are almost totally related in the first person, from Walt's point of view, and George Kuch is excellent as Walt, becomes Walt, talking to his audience like he's telling a tale to an old friend. Together, author and narrator are the perfect pairing, making every one of the (stand alone) stories in the series unmissable. My thanks to the rights holder of Lady Justice and the Magic Dragon who, at my request, freely gifted me a complimentary copy of the audio, via Audiobook Boom. Such a treat.
Simply superb and highly recommended.

  • A Watched Pot

  • By: Mr. Blue
  • Narrated by: David Morley Hale
  • Length: 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 4
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 4
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 4

Graham is trying his hardest to save his marriage. When his wife, Cressida, invites two new friends over for dinner he offers to cook even though he has no experience with vegan food. Something troubles Graham about the couple, but he can’t quite put his finger on it. He takes a journey into Facebook to find a terrible truth which creates a sinister consequence.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Going vegan.

  • By Norma Miles on 05-10-18

Going vegan.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-10-18

This little satire might be short in length but is packed full of character. A dinner party, vegan guests who are the friends of the disagreeable hostess and the poor underdog husband who is doing all of the work. Yes, the ending was predictable, but none the less delicious because of it. The narrator, David Morley Hade, with exaggerated accents and gloriously sardonic reading, perfectly captures the spirit of the story. Only his very audible sharp intakes of breath between some sentences cast a shadow on his otherwise excellent performance.

My thanks to the rights holder for freely gifting me a complimentary copy of A Watched Pot, at my request, via Audiobook Boom. I will certainly be looking out for more works by Mr.Blue.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Jade Ihara Adventures: Omnibus Edition

  • By: David Wood, Sean Ellis
  • Narrated by: Jeffrey Kafer
  • Length: 25 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3

Three complete novels from the best-selling Jade Ihara Adventures series by David Wood and Sean Ellis! 

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Very enjoyable adventures...!

  • By Salter on 11-09-18

There's more going on than anyone can think.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-10-18

A three book omnibus of the Jade Ihara series, books 1 to 3: Oracle, Changeling and Exile. Each is fast and furious almost non stop action.
Oracle: A very intriguing opening to the book, with two conflicting reminiscences from one Gill Parez in 1593, each wondering what his life would have been like had he made a different choice about four years before, really excited this reader into thinking that this book would be something really special. And this feeling continued for another few chapters. before returning to a more conventional digging-into -the-past-for-lost-objects-of-power type of adventure book. It was an exciting read, absolutely packed with frenetic action, an Indiana Jones on steroids, and that was just the second protagonist!
The main story centres around Jade O'Hara, an archaeologist, whose main expertise is in pre-Columbian American cultures, hired to excavate a tunnel into the Pyramid of the Sun which had preceded the Aztecs, who took it over, by many hundreds of years. Almost nothing was known about the builders. With her was ex-SEAL, Peter 'Professor' Chapman (amongst others), a man she had known before and had hoped not to meet again since he had been a close friend of Jade's one time lover, Dane Maddock. The relationship had ended badly, for her, at least, and she still was filled with the what-ifs of their time together. This reader had not read any of the books in which they appeared together but this did not in any way affect the understanding of Oracle, although it explains the initial feeling of entering a series where other books have gone before.

One aspect which was very enjoyable, if sometimes difficult to understand, was a mix of the ancient cultures with very current scientific ideas of quantum mechanics and time itself, as explained by another of the team, Paul. It allowed for some very strange occurrences.

Changeling: Another very intriguing start to the second story in the Jade Ihara adventures; this one has Jade and Professor traveling around the world in search of the truth behind a theory advanced by an old enemy of Jade's, a man who was a leading light in the conspiracy theory concerning Phantom Time and aliens running the world. Sadly, there is very little archaeology to lighten the non stop action.
Although good fun, with a little enjoyable banter between the two main protagonists, for this reader they remain unsubstantial characters, perhaps proving part of the main concept after all.
For fast, ongoing action, this is a must read - aliens, religious terrorists, disappearing planes, a mysterious cave no one should enter...it has it all. But somehow it doesn't quite satisfy

Exile: 'You mean you've never seen Ben Hur?' For a fairly innocuous, if indestructible, archaeologist who rarely seems to get a chance to dig, Jade Ihara certainly gets herself, and her ex-SEAL companion, Professor, caught up murderous adventures and bizarre cults. This instalment finds her once more travelling the world in search of a relic, this one dating back to the time of Cassius and the Spartacus rebellion. Doesn't sound too intrepid but, along the way, she encounters, amongst other things, kidnap, human trafficking, Voodoo zombies, power crazies, lots of swimming, lots of tears and, of course, gunshots, gunshots everywhere. Lucky that she has Professor to protect her! It was positively exhausting just to read. One brief pause, in Rome, provides a quick glimpse at the marvels of the ancient buildings before she was on the run again.

Narrated by Jeffrey Kafer, the stories in the book swiftly move along, his easy to listen to voice moving in pace with the action with good intonation and articulation,. He breathes life into the characters as they hurtle from one danger to another, his differing accents for the various nationalities encountered nicely finessed. A good performance which kept me listening to the end.
My thanks to the rights holder of this omnibus edition of the Jade Ihara Adventures who, at my request, freely gifted me a complimentary copy, via Audiobook Boom.
Definitely a book for fans of non stop action. And it was enjoyable.
But if i were Jade, I'd try to hide away somewhere quiet for the next few years, pottering gently on a little dig somewhere non controversial.