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Neozoe

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  • 2
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Truly riveting Crichton-esque storytelling

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-02-20

The essence of Crichton-esque science fiction is captured herewith: factual, fast-paced and focused. It had so many cliffhangers that I how have altitude sickness (the edgiest being the discovery that James Stone was the baby that survived the Piedmont incident and was thus immune to the Andromeda evolution!).

I was mesmerized by the ai-enhanced personal drones of Dr Stone, the brain-interface technology used by Dr Kline and the quick-thinking scientific efficacy of Dr Vadala.
The diversity of The Wildfire Team was also impressive.

African fiction narrated by a local phantom

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 16-02-20

You can never say there was paucity of proverbs in this story.
There was a near-inexhaustible stream of epithets for the Creator-figure in the Igbo cosmology. I often looked forward to guessing what the next one would be 🤯 My newest catchphrase is : Gaaganagwu
I haven't read this sort of account, from the perspective of a supernatural, since Anne Rice's Lestat or Memnoch.
The Chi, who is unnamed, offers no real support or advantage to his host and was really clueless for the most part. I also didn't understand why he was giving an account to a supposedly omniscient Creator-figure who had predestined everything that occurs.
Also, this Chi didn't really get a vacation because he was called to the inception of Chinomso just shortly after looking forward to chilling in the cataracts of the Ogbunigwe Cave. It had Chi-burnout in my opinion. Next time it should be sent to Chicago 😆

A very emotive story

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-02-20

I have read many fictionalized accounts of slavery but this was the bleakest I've encountered.
I genuinely despaired and was distraught at the trials of Cora. I'm probably going to need therapy after this.
Man's inhumanity to man is laid bare in the based-on-reality tale.

Masterfully delivered

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-02-20

The performance was exhilarating! The singing especially so!
I don't know if fictionalizing the underground railroad to freedom and mystifying Harriet Tubman is the best call but I do know it certainly softens the narrative of slavery or as the author innocuously calls it 'The Task".
The dichotomy between the tasked and the quality is masterfully rendered: Curious would-be-saviors, like Corrine Quinn, have dubious motives which makes them the victims and not the tasked that they wish to free. Well played!
I do look forward to more.

1 person found this helpful

Riveting African Odyssey

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-01-20

I enjoyed the performance.
I was introduced to the world of Nuru and Okeke in her collection of short stories and I was pleased to get more meat the bones of that premise.

A thrilling and exciting read!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-12-19

I can't imagine why this book is not yet a feature film!
It has is-this-real elements of the matrix, inception and fight club, as well as the intrigue and dystopia of George Orwell's 1984.
It is a truly fine and exceptional piece of work. I will be recommending this to others. The dry acerbic humor and the very intimate portrayal of the geography of London and it's underground is so on the money that it spoke to much with me.
There should be a Neverwhere-themed London tour in Google maps!

The perfect cocktail of Afrocentric sci-fi stories

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-11-19

I occasionally dabble into sci-fi.
I was intrigued by this collection of Africa-themed sci-fi
short stories written by a young female author.

I was not disappointed.

There was never a dull moment. Every story moved
rhythmically and pulsated with emotion and imagination.

It moved me. It stirred me. It made me feel alive!

Humorous but the spun web isn't that intricate

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-04-18

It was easy to listen to and the performance was riveting.
Not to many characters to keep track of.
The theme in American Gods about how ancient gods made redundant by more modern gods can be reenergized by being remembered in some way.
Each god seems to have it's own pantheon & backstory & rivalries. It gave the already fictitious story an otherworldly incomprehensibility when you tried to match it with the backstories of gods introduced in American Gods.
The gods seemed unaware of other gods not in their own story.

A daring confrontational but realistic tale

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-10-17

I had always been averse to bearing children.
I was struggling with step-parenthood and the enormous amount of putting up appearance of enjoying it that it demanded. I was on the verge of thinking something was wrong with me when the movie based on this book was released. I knew I had to read it, but I waited to have several therapy sessions first.
It may be confirmation bias that made the book appeal to me or the fact that it encouraged challenging stereotypes and confronting unflattering introspective assessments of one's motives, feelings and actions.
Eva Khatchadourian permitted herself to not like/love her child in the expected way but she loved him because she was honest about how she felt dealt with what she saw and not what she hoped for.

Factual and poignant material

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 23-09-17

It was a very sobering and often tear-inducing presentation of factual information done in a relaxed conversational interview-style that was quite a novel experience for me in Audible.
I had just finished listening to "1984" by George Orwell so I was quite wired up and alert to overt and covert mind control techniques.
I had also read "The Manipulated Man" by Esther Villar a few years ago and this book brought statistical backing to throw arguments made there.
I believe inequality will persist in human society until God's Kingdom comes. Until then, open your eyes, be kind to reach other regardless of perceived or contrived differences. We are all humans.