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lilith_farrell

York, United Kingdom
  • 9
  • reviews
  • 16
  • helpful votes
  • 67
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  • Moriarty

  • By: Anthony Horowitz
  • Narrated by: Julian Rhind-Tutt, Derek Jacobi
  • Length: 10 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,165
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,093
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,095

Sherlock Holmes is dead. Days after Holmes and his arch-enemy Moriarty fall to their doom at the Reichenbach Falls, Pinkerton agent Frederick Chase arrives in Europe from New York. The death of Moriarty has created a poisonous vacuum which has been swiftly filled by a fiendish new criminal mastermind who has risen to take his place.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Completely taken in

  • By Joanna on 11-03-15

lots of predictable but surprised in the end

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-12-18

It's quite easy to guess after half of the book as what should be Moriarty's doing and what is not. But I didn't expect the ending. Sort of suspected the catch in the middle but somehow deemed it unlikely so gave up on my suspicion. As always, turned out I disregarded the correct answer. I think this one is better than the last. Perhaps because writing about Moriarty is less restricted by originals than Holmes. However, the author probably need to figure out a way to explain Holmes' reason for faking his death.

  • The Black Ice: Harry Bosch Series, Book 2

  • By: Michael Connelly
  • Narrated by: Dick Hill
  • Length: 11 hrs and 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 756
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 591
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 592

Narcotics officer Cal Moore's orders were to look into the city's latest drug killing. Instead, he ends up in a motel room with his head in several pieces and a suicide note stuffed in his back pocket.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Another great book from Micheal Connolly

  • By Matthew Rayner on 17-07-09

Better than the first one

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 31-07-18

The plot was interesting. Although I suspected in the begining, didn't figure out how it was done. Downside was, it's really getting old that everyone had a grudge against Bosch. Not only did he always work to catch the killer, he also had to work against the entire police department. IAD had nothing else to do but got excited about putting him to the grass. Under this condition, you have a so serious problem with the entire criminal justice system that catching one killer is not even the point any more.

  • Good Girls Don't Die

  • By: Isabelle Grey
  • Narrated by: Melody Grove
  • Length: 12 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,005
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 919
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 911

Accused of grassing up a fellow officer and driven brutally out of home and job, DI Grace Fisher is thankful to survive some dark times and find haven with the Major Investigation Team in Essex. Any hopes of a quiet start to her new life are dashed by the discovery of the body of a female student, last seen at a popular bar in Colchester. Grace has her first case. When a second student, also out drinking, is murdered and left grotesquely posed, the case becomes headline news. Someone is leaking disturbing details to a tabloid crime reporter. Is it the killer? Or a detective close to the case?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent

  • By Victoria Burton on 17-01-15

Too much DS Fisher's private life interrupt

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 31-07-18

The case is alright, murderer okay. It's just the Fisher's personal life got too much into the story, making her appear unprofessional in so many ways. Every time she got good thinking on the case, she went and did something stupid regarding her personal life, then sort of play victim. If she could just be a perceptive DS and only have slightly personal life mixed in, the story would have been better.

  • The Defence

  • By: Steve Cavanagh
  • Narrated by: Adam Sims
  • Length: 10 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 341
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 319
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 321

The truth has no place in a courtroom. The truth doesn't matter in a trial. The only thing that matters is what the prosecution can prove. Eddie Flynn used to be a con artist. Then he became a lawyer. Turned out the two weren't that different. It's been more than a year since Eddie vowed never to set foot in a courtroom again. But now he doesn't have a choice. Olek Volchek, the infamous head of the Russian mafia in New York, has strapped a bomb to Eddie's back and kidnapped his ten-year-old daughter, Amy.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Fast and furious.

  • By anne on 25-02-16

Too many background storylines

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 31-07-18

The stoy was told from a first person perspective, which inevitably meant that the lead character gave the impression that he talked too much. Probably because this is the first book of the series, there were multiple sections in the first half introducing background stories, past friends, life path, etc. Normally, it wouldn't be a problem, but this story was set to be within 24 hours to make the thrill and these sidestories kept interruptting that thrill. The second half, after all the sidestories done, the plot got back online.

  • Charles de Gaulle

  • By: Don Cook
  • Narrated by: Frederick Davidson
  • Length: 22 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 12
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 10
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10

This magnificent volume by veteran European correspondent Don Cook is the first major biography of de Gaulle written by an American from an American perspective. Rich with new anecdotal material, it offers fresh evaluations and sheds new light on Europe's most controversial and enigmatic general, politician, and statesman.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Interesting content, AWFUL narrator

  • By Amazon Customer on 20-02-13

Quality of recording is disappointing

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-11-16

The reading itself is fine but somehow there's pause here and there and the sound of turning pages and someone's breathing is very annoying.
The book was written in 1980s so there might be certain things that have come to light since.

  • Foundations of Eastern Civilization

  • By: Craig G. Benjamin, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Craig G. Benjamin
  • Length: 23 hrs and 22 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 53
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 50
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 49

China. Korea. Japan. Southeast Asia. How did Eastern civilization develop? What do we know about the history, politics, governments, art, science, and technology of these countries? And how does the story of Eastern civilization play out in today's world of business, politics, and international exchange?

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Overall good but details need checking

  • By lilith_farrell on 12-02-16

Overall good but details need checking

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-02-16

What did you like best about Foundations of Eastern Civilization? What did you like least?

The course covers the history of Asia from pre-history to modern day, with an emphasis on the part before 16th/17th century. Probably because of the emphasis on foundation of the course. On a grand scale, the relatively isolated Asia and subsequent exchange of ideas and trade within Asia and with west are well established and told. So it's good for a general introduction to East Asian history, particularly China, Korea and Japan. The pronunciation is certainly awkward for a non-Chinese/Korean/Japanese speaker, but he tried, and mostly succeeded.
However, the small nuisances and details in regard to a particular character or place or name are often wrong. For example, it's common to refer to an emperor by his reign name or posthumous title or real name. But to mistake one's reign name for his real name is a bit too much. Same goes saying the last emperor of Sui dynasty declared himself "Yang Di (the flaming emperor)". Firstly, that's a posthumous title, no one declares themselves that title. Secondly, even if someone did, he wouldn't have picked that name. Because, although in common language, "Yang" means flaming, in posthumous title, it means "deviation from justice, not fulfil one's duty", simply not a positive title. You only ever see the last or second to last emperor of a dynasty to have that title. It especially annoyed me because he had to repeat this wrong understanding several times along the way. Similarly, Japan's "tent government" doesn't mean it's meant to be temporary. Tent government is not an accurate translation in the first place, too literal. The head of "tent government" Shokan, in fact means General or high command. Tent was his headquarters when he was out fighting. It's where his advisors, high ranking officers gathered discussing strategy and made decisions. So when a general claimed power, his government was called "tent government".

Would you recommend Foundations of Eastern Civilization to your friends? Why or why not?

For a friend who doesn't know anything of eastern culture, I would recommend it for it gives enough contents and links with western countries to be easily understandable. For someone who knows eastern culture or want to go a bit amateur professional on the subject, I wouldn't because it contains a lot of mistakes to make further research hard and confusing.

Which character – as performed by Professor Craig G. Benjamin – was your favourite?

Not applicable in this case

Did Foundations of Eastern Civilization inspire you to do anything?

Check and re-check something I knew but got confused by his mistakes. Got me interested in Korean history though.

Any additional comments?

Got to admit, these details I picked up on probably don't matter on a grand scale. And a non-Chinese/Korean/Japanese speaker is hardly going to remember any awkwardly pronounced names after listening. Just bear in mind these kind of nuisances mentioned in the course aren't entirely accurate.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • The Foundations of Western Civilization

  • By: Thomas F. X. Noble, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Thomas F. X. Noble
  • Length: 24 hrs and 51 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 91
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 82
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 81

What is Western Civilization? According to Professor Noble, it is "much more than human and political geography," encompassing myriad forms of political and institutional structures - from monarchies to participatory republics - and its own traditions of political discourse. It involves choices about who gets to participate in any given society and the ways in which societies have resolved the tension between individual self-interest and the common good.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Loved it - I'll be ordering more

  • By First Impressions on 21-09-16

General Outline of western history

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 27-03-15

These lectures cover all the aspects of western history. Naturally they're not very detailed. By it serves as a start point so one can have a general idea of what time period what happens.
The downside for me would be some of the names are very difficult to remember, so it's kind of hard to remember whose idea is what at a later lecture. Another thing is, the narrator sometimes spoke too slow or even paused for no apparent reason (not like give audience time to think). On the topic front, it's probably just me, I was totally lost in the lectures about philosophy, the great thinkers.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Espionage and Covert Operations: A Global History

  • By: Vejas Gabriel Liulevicius, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Vejas Gabriel Liulevicius
  • Length: 12 hrs and 19 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 105
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 99
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 99

Step into the real world of the spy with this detailed and unforgettable tour of the millennia-long history and enduring legacy of espionage and covert operations. While most of us associate this top-secret subject with popular fiction and film, its true story is more fascinating, surprising, and important than you could possibly imagine. These 24 thrilling lectures survey how world powers have attempted to work in the shadows to gain secret information or subvert enemies behind the scenes.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Good start point

  • By lilith_farrell on 03-10-14

Good start point

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-10-14

What made the experience of listening to Espionage and Covert Operations: A Global History the most enjoyable?

The lectures were given in a rather entertaining form, with a lot of information references. So I got the general story about the topic, also got several references to check afterwards if I want. I can't say it's comprehensive but definitely a good start.

What did you like best about this story?

Multiple books recommendation for further reading. Very entertaining.

Which scene did you most enjoy?

The in fact male spy managed to convince a male French diplomat that he was a woman. They then had an affair and the spy later told the diplomat he was pregnant...

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

No. Several lectures were linked more closely than others so maybe listen to them in one sitting.

Any additional comments?

I feel like the title 'global' is not quite right for the content. It is more like 'western history', for except for some bits about Ninja and 'the Art of War', the Asian part is largely missing. There is far more information about British, Soviet/Russian, American. Sure, they have been the major players in modern history, still, the course is not global enough to justify the title.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Rules of Prey

  • A Lucas Davenport Mystery, Book 1
  • By: John Sandford
  • Narrated by: Richard Ferrone
  • Length: 11 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 70
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 62
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 61

For Maddog, the killer who had Minneapolis in a grip of chilled terror, satisfaction came from the thrill of the contest. After each grisly murder he would leave behind one of the rules he had devised: Never kill anyone you know. Never have a motive. Never follow a discernible pattern. He was no textbook psychopath. But Lieutenant Lucas Davenport was no ordinary detective. To bring an end to Maddog's trail of death, he would have to play by his own rules.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A good mixture of fiction and reality

  • By lilith_farrell on 09-12-13

A good mixture of fiction and reality

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-12-13

Would you listen to Rules of Prey again? Why?

Maybe. There were some details about the police work on the street worth listening again. There's also some interesting twist of the events.

What did you like best about this story?

The lead character Lucas couldn't be real, but the author did a good job mixing him into the realistic background. So even though it is a fiction, it didn't feel fake. The story gave us a lovely character that we could like but not sound like a prince from fairytale.

What about Richard Ferrone’s performance did you like?

It wasn't bad but there's some curious sudden stop and inhale between sentences. Not a big deal but occasionally got me out of story as I would think it's intentional yet it turned out not.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

After police screwed up the ambush in the journalist's home, Lucas was low and depressed. He beat himself up for the lost and gave up. But another detective came in, asked Lucas to follow a lead with him. That lead turned out well. But it's a bonus and a push for the plot. I like it because everyone has his own moment of downtime, it might only take one friend care enough to ask to get one back on track. The person might not even close to us but they come when needed. I wish I would be more grateful to my friends for they care.

Any additional comments?

If you watch TV episodes like Criminal Minds, the plot would be standard serial killer story even the motive behind it. I am not an expert in the field so can't say how real it was. But it does reduce the feeling of novelty.

8 of 8 people found this review helpful