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  • Shoe Dog

  • A Memoir by the Creator of Nike
  • By: Phil Knight
  • Narrated by: Norbert Leo Butz, Phil Knight - introduction
  • Length: 13 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 4,603
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 4,116
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 4,115

In this candid and riveting memoir, for the first time ever, Nike founder and CEO Phil Knight shares the inside story of the company's early days as an intrepid start-up and its evolution into one of the world's most iconic, game-changing, and profitable brands.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Wow. 10/10. A must for entrepreneurs...

  • By AJ the Tramp on 07-02-18

Excellent

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-07-19

A good insightful look at how the company was built.

Very much focused on pre 90's which is a shame as it means some key moments in Nike's history were completely missed out (e.g. the "Just Do It" campaign), but the period it covers it does well.

Very well narrated too.

  • Titan

  • The Life of John D. Rockefeller, Sr.
  • By: Ron Chernow
  • Narrated by: Grover Gardner
  • Length: 35 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 249
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 230
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 230

Titan is the first full-length biography based on unrestricted access to Rockefeller’s exceptionally rich trove of papers. A landmark publication full of startling revelations, the book indelibly alters our image of this most enigmatic capitalist. Born the son of a flamboyant, bigamous snake-oil salesman and a pious, straitlaced mother, Rockefeller rose from rustic origins to become the world’s richest man by creating America’s most powerful and feared monopoly, Standard Oil. Branded "the Octopus" by legions of muckrakers, the trust refined and marketed nearly 90 percent of the oil produced in America.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The Unknown Man

  • By James Gorman on 07-07-14

Dry

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-07-19

Relatively interesting and informative, but dry and quite heavy going. Like porridge oats without milk.

  • Bad Blood

  • By: John Carreyrou
  • Narrated by: Will Damron
  • Length: 11 hrs and 36 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 2,275
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,026
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 2,028

The full inside story of the breathtaking rise and shocking collapse of a multibillion-dollar start-up, by the prize-winning journalist who first broke the story and pursued it to the end. In 2014, Theranos founder and CEO Elizabeth Holmes was widely seen as the female Steve Jobs: a brilliant Stanford dropout whose start-up ‘unicorn’ promised to revolutionize the medical industry with a machine that would make blood tests significantly faster and easier. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliant

  • By Amazon Customer on 24-08-18

Should have been so much better

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 14-06-19

Don't expect anything groundbreaking here. Facts and the inner workings of a start up are glossed over in favour of a more tabloid newspaper approach.

From the very outset the whole 'story' seems to be based on the character references of disgruntled ex employees and investors who lost out. We appear to be given a very biased account of a founder who is completely personally and professionally inept, with huge character flaws and no redeeming features aside from being able to put men under a spell with her 'deep blue eyes' and 'unusually deep voice'. yuck cliche. (Also none of the people the author interviewed fell for her charms, just the ones who didn't give their version of events)

I'd go as far as to say it gets a bit distasteful with scorn in bucket-loads for anyone above a certain management level, and what feels like office in-jokes being painted as facts. (I mean whats the whole Steve Jobs thing about)

In reality this is such an interesting story - a woman who initially set out to change the world ended up committing fraud on such a huge scale.

Why did she do it???

Is there inherent flaws in the system as a whole? Was the pressure of taking huge amounts of venture capital too much? Was she trying to keep a dying dream to change the world alive? Was it the pressure of being one of the only female CEOs in male dominated silicone valley? .... apparently not, she was just a baddie.