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Kaggy

United Kingdom
  • 266
  • reviews
  • 2,125
  • helpful votes
  • 275
  • ratings
  • Kill Someone

  • By: Luke Smitherd
  • Narrated by: Matt Addis
  • Length: 8 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,321
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,278
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,274

Here are the rules. Method: you can't use a gun. You can't use explosives. You can't use poison. It has to be up close and personal. You don't have to worry about leaving evidence; that will be taken care of. Victim: no one suicidal. No one over the age of 65. No one with a terminal illness. Choose your method. Choose your victim.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Dark and gripping

  • By M. Williams on 17-03-17

A reflection of horror

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 20-07-19

This is one of those moral dilemma stories that cleverly puts the main character in a position that means whatever he does will have dire consequences. It is a recollection of terrible events and as such it is quietly retrospective than action packed. The main character is sufficiently vulnerable and likeable to keep me listening, and the evil he confronts chilled me to the bone. There are elements of the story that I have seen used in films and other works and so it didn’t feel quite as fresh and original as I hoped. Overall a solid listen, well delivered by the narrator but not particularly memorable.

The Butterfly Effect with Jon Ronson cover art
  • The Butterfly Effect with Jon Ronson

  • By: Jon Ronson
  • Narrated by: Jon Ronson
  • Length: 3 hrs and 25 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,314
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,868
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,854

Hear the story of what happened when the tech industry gave the world what it wanted: free porn. Lives were mangled. Fortunes were made. All for your pleasure. Follow writer and narrator Jon Ronson as he uncovers our web of desire.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Something Literally From Out of the Blue!

  • By Simon on 28-07-17

Another winner from Jon

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 16-02-19

I approached this with some trepidation because I really didn’t want to listen to a lurid documentary about porn. This however was free on Audible and that coupled with the fact it is written and narrated by Jon meant it was worth some time. The beginning did seem to meet my low expectations but as it progressed I really warmed to this story about people who have been affected by the advent of free pornography. There are many sympathetic characters and some genuinely moving tales and throughout Jon listens with warmth and humour. Some of the science is truly shocking and it really is worth listening to hear how free porn is radically changing our society in very unexpectated ways.

  • Devil's Day

  • By: Andrew Michael Hurley
  • Narrated by: Richard Burnip
  • Length: 10 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 50
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 47
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 48

Every autumn, John Pentecost returns to the farm where he grew up to help gather the sheep down from the moors for the winter. Very little changes in the Endlands, but this year, his grandfather - the Gaffer - has died and John's new wife, Katherine, is accompanying him for the first time. Each year, the Gaffer would redraw the boundary lines of the village, with pen and paper, but also through the remembrance of tales and timeless communal rituals, which keep the sheep safe from the Devil.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The Devil's Own Country?

  • By Rachel Redford on 10-11-17

Horror springs up when you least expect it

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-02-19

This is like a cross between The Archers, Royston Vasey and The Wicker Man told through the eyes of a young farmer yearning to return to his life in The Endlands. The author provides is a lyrical description of the harsh realities of farming the bleak Northern moorlands. On one hand you could almost yearn for a life driven by hard but satisfying work, comforted by a warm kitchen fire and coddled by home cooked wholesome food. On the other, this exposes you to the gruesome realities of life in an isolated and fiercely superstitious community and to people who are despised by their neighbours and may or may not be seriously unhinged. The main character, who is also the narrator, is a disturbing man and his manipulation of his young pregnant wife is chillingly played out. My one criticism is the fact that his wife Kat is undoubtably appalled by what is going on around her, but is also inexplicably compliant to her husband’s demands and this leaves a bit of a gap in the story’s logic. Although some may say the pace is slow, this is a book that delivers its horror in short sharp bursts, and this is the thing that kept me listening to the end. I preferred The Loney but this is still a great read/listen and Richard Burnip narrated it beautifully.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Man Who Died

  • By: Antti Tuomainen, David Hackston
  • Narrated by: Kris Dyer
  • Length: 9 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 144
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 137
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 137

A successful entrepreneur in the mushroom industry, Jaakko Kaunismaa is a man in his prime. At just 37 years of age, he is shocked when his doctor tells him that he's dying. What is more, the cause is discovered to be prolonged exposure to toxins; in other words, someone has slowly but surely been poisoning him. Determined to find out who wants him dead, Jaakko embarks on a suspenseful roller-coaster journey full of unusual characters, bizarre situations and unexpected twists.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Jaako is a Fun Guy

  • By Simon on 05-08-18

Innovative thriller with a wry sense of humour

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 21-12-18

I must admit I thought I had my fill of Scandi Noir after ploughing my way through the Girl With The Dragon Tattoo series. This however tempted me in with a very promising storyline. A thriller based around the Finnish Mushroom industry is definitely unusual and when you add a charming and self-deprecating hero who handles the news of his imminent demise with bemusement, you really are in for a refreshing treat. This is a story that keeps you in the dark until the very end and delivers an almost equal quantity of laughs and thrills along the way. People say this reminds them of Fargo and I think they are spot on.
Kris Dyer presents this very well. His voice reminds me of David Mitchell (of Mitchell and Webb) and his natural sparkle is perfect for this material. This I my first book by Antti Toumainen and after this I will be in the market for more. Overall this is a 10/10 from me and a great pleasure to find a new and original author to enjoy.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • The Silent Companions

  • By: Laura Purcell
  • Narrated by: Katie Scarfe
  • Length: 10 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 599
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 555
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 556

Inspired by the work of Shirley Jackson and Susan Hill and set in a crumbling country mansion, The Silent Companions is an unsettling Victorian gothic ghost story that will send a shiver down the spine.... Newly married, newly widowed Elsie is sent to see out her pregnancy at her late husband's crumbling country estate, The Bridge. With her new servants resentful and the local villagers actively hostile, Elsie only has her husband's awkward cousin for company. Or so she thinks.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Eerie and fabulous

  • By Caz on 24-03-18

A good story with some genuine chills

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-12-18

This is a good eerie psychological mystery which intertwines the lives of two very interesting and engaging women, one from the 16th century and one from the 18th. The narrative goes backwards and forwards in time but the time shifts are well signposted so I was able to listen to this without getting too confused. The story did get a bit over-melodramatic for my taste but I was very satisfied with the genuinely chilling and nail biting ending. Katie Scarfe is an excellent narrator and carried this off extremely well. This is the sort of tale that would make an excellent television drama and one I would most certainly watch.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • How to Be Right

  • ...in a world gone wrong
  • By: James O'Brien
  • Narrated by: James O'Brien
  • Length: 4 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,075
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1,865
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,843

In How to Be Right, James provides a hilarious and invigorating guide to talking to people with faulty opinions. With chapters on every lightning-rod issue, James shows how people have been fooled into thinking the way they do and in each case outlines the key questions to ask to reveal fallacies, inconsistencies and double standards. If you ever get cornered by ardent Brexiteers, Daily Mail disciples or little England patriots, this book is your conversation survival guide.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I had high expectations & they were surpassed.

  • By A. Fox on 02-11-18

Smart, thought provoking and thoroughly entertaining

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 15-11-18

I first came across James O’Brien when he presented Newsnight and after seeing his blistering and frequently hilarious interviews with the ‘great and good’ I quickly became a fan. I was therefore disappointed when he departed to pursue his career on LBC but was quickly consoled after listening to his shows. I agree he can be abrasive and some of his takedowns can sound cruel but this book gives an excellent explanation as to why he reacts so strongly to people who base their views on conjecture rather than objective facts.
This audiobook reproduces some of his most startling conversations and although they are acted, much of the passion of the original discussions is well reproduced. James has famously strong views on Brexit and this is something he is currently admired and reviled for. He does however demonstrate a willingness to consider the views of others and has the humility to say he simply doesn’t know the answer on occasion.
This is a fascinating insight into the mind of a man who wants to be right not to satisfy his ego, but because it is the right thing to be. I hope he gets the opportunity to present on television again but in the meantime this book does a great job of filling the gap.

10 of 13 people found this review helpful

  • Consent

  • Read Me
  • By: Leo Benedictus
  • Narrated by: Mathew Baynton
  • Length: 6 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 21
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 20
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 21

The Secret History meets American Psycho in this superbly crafted novel. This magnetic book pulls you in its wake even as you resist its force. Sometimes you don't want to know what's next.... This book is an experiment. We're experimenting together. You are part of the experiment, if you'll agree to it. Normally I don't let my subjects choose to be subjects. If you know you're being watched, you cease to be you. But I want you to listen to this. I wrote it for you.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Well written but I had to stop listening

  • By Kaggy on 06-11-18

Well written but I had to stop listening

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-11-18

My fault I suppose but I was hoping for something a bit more subtle when I chose this. Leo Benedictus is clearly a gifted writer but with this one he strays too much into gore and sadism for my taste.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Tideline

  • By: Penny Hancock
  • Narrated by: Juanita McMahon, Charlotte Strevens
  • Length: 11 hrs and 25 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 33
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 26
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 26

One winter's afternoon, Sonia, 43, married and respectable, answers the door to 15-year-old Jez. He’s come to borrow some music. Sonia invites him in and soon decides that she isn't going to let him leave. As Sonia's desire to keep Jez hidden and protected from the outside world becomes all the more overpowering, she is haunted by memories of an intense teenage relationship, which gradually reveal a terrifying truth.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • messin' about on the river

  • By Neil on 29-02-12

Unpleasantly dark, dank and depressing

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-10-18

This is my second Penny Hancock book (the first was the rather brilliant The Darkening Hour). This is set in the same area of London circa Greenwich and like the other book Tideline is full of beautiful and evocative descriptions of suburban life beside the Thames. The storyline here however was not something I could easily stomach. It was depressing enough to read about the desperate and futile attempts of a child trying to escape the clutches of a predatory madwoman but when it began exploring a sexual and sadistic relationship between two minors I decided enough was enough. I know this is going to make me sound an insufferable, prude, and perhaps I am, but I think it is really a question of what I want to spend my precious time listening to, and this isn't it. I urge people to give The Darkening Hour a chance though. It really is extremely good.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • The Cows

  • By: Dawn O'Porter
  • Narrated by: Dawn O'Porter, Karen Cass, Laura Kirman
  • Length: 11 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,747
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,505
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,507

The Cows is a powerful novel about three women. In all the noise of modern life, each needs to find her own voice. It's about friendship and being female. It's bold and brilliant. It's searingly perceptive. It's about never following the herd. And everyone is going to be talking about it.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Awesome

  • By Hippynat on 24-05-17

Interesting but flawed

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 17-09-18

This book is really a long musing about women's issues and I can't criticise it for that. Some of the points are interesting and well made, but as a story I found it flawed. Overall I thought it struggled with trying to deliver some important and serious points but utilising Brigit Jones style characters in farcical situations. For example one of the main sub-plots involves preventing a male character seeing something on the internet. The whole idea was that his PA had complete control over his life. This was frankly unbelievable and silly. Another character is supposed to be shocked and surprised at seeing an embarrassing event on the internet even though the event happened the night before and she knew it had been filmed. Stella was a particularly good and intriguing character but her plot turns into an absurd comedy caused by her stupid and unnecessary lies. In short I think this story should either have been a drama or a comedy and it didn't really work as both.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Calling Major Tom

  • By: David M. Barnett
  • Narrated by: David Thorpe
  • Length: 11 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 194
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 179
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 179

Calling Major Tom is a funny, uplifting tale of friendship and community about a man who has given up on the world...but discovers in the most unlikely way that it might not have given up on him. We all know someone like Thomas. The grumpy next-door neighbour who complains to the residents' committee about the state of your front lawn. The man who tuts when you don't have the correct change at the checkout. The colleague who sends an all-company email when you accidentally use the last drop of milk.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Feeling Blue?

  • By Jumpin' Bean on 19-07-17

A pleasant little diversion

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-08-18

This was purchased as part of a two for one offer and to be honest I took a bit of a flyer with this choice, but I’m glad I made it. This is like a Richard Curtis film, with his characteristic gentle humour shot through with some moments of genuine poignancy. Tom is a man who has made mistakes in his life but is fundamentally a good person who deserves our sympathy. His decision to go to Mars may not be entirely believable given the current state of the British space programme, but there are enough clever little details to make his adventure almost credible. The author makes use of genuine events (for example a misdialled phone call from space) to make this an enjoyable yarn that is very relatable. The only issue I have is the balance of the storyline. Once the Wigan side of the story is dealt with, the Major Tom side ends abruptly and this is rather a shame. On the upside David Thorpe is a terrific narrator and he carries this off extremely well. This is a light entertaining read/listen and let’s face it, we all need one of those every so often.




2 of 2 people found this review helpful