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  • The Vampire Lestat

  • The Vampire Chronicles, Book 2
  • By: Anne Rice
  • Narrated by: Simon Vance
  • Length: 21 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 276
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 223
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 223

Once an aristocrat in the heady days of pre-revolutionary France, now Lestat is a rockstar in the demonic, shimmering 1980s. He rushes through the centuries in search of others like him, seeking answers to the mystery of his terrifying exsitence. His story, the second volume in Anne Rice's best-selling Vampire Chronicles, is mesmerizing, passionate, and thrilling.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliant!

  • By GMJ on 14-04-13

The gold standard of modern Vampire fiction.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 16-02-19

Not since Bram Stoker's Dracula has a book been so essential to the development and popularity of literary Vampires.

  • Alien: Sea of Sorrows

  • An Audible Original Drama
  • By: James A. Moore, Dirk Maggs
  • Narrated by: John Chancer, Stockard Channing, Walles Hamonde, and others
  • Length: 5 hrs and 7 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,624
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,502
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,496

Set 300 years after the events of Alien: Out of the Shadows and Alien: River of Pain, Alien: Sea of Sorrows deals with the rediscovery of dormant Xenomorphs (Aliens) in the abandoned mines of LV-178, the planetoid from Alien: Out of the Shadows, which has now been terraformed and renamed New Galveston. The Weyland-Yutani Corporation, reformed after the collapse of the United Systems Military, continue their unceasing efforts to weaponise the creatures.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Drowning in Aliens!

  • By Simon on 26-04-18

Incoherent nonsense

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-06-18

If you have any respect for the Alien franchise, it's universe, it's lore and the expertly crafted story of the first two films, you'll get nothing but rage from this book.
Having no appreciation for what made Giger's xenomorphs effectively scary and interesting, Moore and Maggs did what every hack does when given creative control over a piece of official Alien fiction: They tried to humanise the xenomorphs. This is done through the introduction of a descendant of Ripley, named Decker who is an "empath" capable of detecting emotions (Don't know if it's ever explained how he became an empath, I became too frustrated to keep listening about half way through.) Through Decker, we hear some of the xenomorph's internal monologue. If that sounds like a horrible idea to you then, congratulations; You have a better understanding of the Alien universe than the writers of this official work of Alien fiction do.
A huge part of what made Giger's xenomorphs scary was how completely, unmitigatedly ALIEN they are. Giving them dialogue we can understand could only possibly detract from that, even if it wasn't the most generic, hackneyed villain monologue you could imagine (Which, incidentally, it is.)
[SPOILER AHEAD FOR THIS BOOK AND ALIEN: OUT OF THE SHADOWS]
The cherry on top of this five-flavor sunday of incompetence is that, in gallant defiance of common sense, the writers are still labouring under the delusion that anyone liked Out of the Shadows, and consequently, are STILL trying to reconcile the cringe-inducing retcon that OotS is built on with the rest of the Alien universe. The exact moment I stopped listening and deleted this book was when it was revealed that a medical pod some of the characters were examining had been used to treat Ripley between the first and second movies.
Now, if you're thinking to yourself "But that doesn't make any sense, she was in cryo-sleep between movies", then congratulations once again: You have more respect for the masterpieces of Ridley Scott and James Cameron than the hacks who wrote this and Out of the Shadows

3 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Two Treatises of Government

  • By: John Locke
  • Narrated by: James Langton
  • Length: 10 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 21
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 20
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 19

Often considered the foundation of political liberalism, John Locke's Two Treatises of Government was first published anonymously in 1689, in the wake of England's Glorious Revolution. In The First Treatise of Government, Locke refutes the idea of divine monarchy, while The Second Treatise of Government articulates Locke's philosophy of government, which he based upon his theories of natural rights and the social contract.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Glorious and I was sad when it ended.

  • By SiLondon on 06-09-18

A hugely important work, done justice

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-06-18

Anyone who values democratic government owes a huge amount to Locke, and Langton's performance treats the work with the gravitas it deserves.