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Ras

  • 12
  • reviews
  • 50
  • helpful votes
  • 57
  • ratings
  • The Wealth of Nations

  • By: Adam Smith
  • Narrated by: Gildart Jackson
  • Length: 36 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 67
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 58
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 54

The foundation for all modern economic thought and political economy, The Wealth of Nations is the magnum opus of Scottish economist Adam Smith, who introduces the world to the very idea of economics and capitalism in the modern sense of the words.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Good but pace yourself

  • By Anonymous User on 06-07-17

Not a pleasant listening despite its greatness

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 17-12-18

The content of the book is certainly remarkable but it is excessively long and detailed in some chapters. The narrator speaks clearly but without any engagement with the text. He is so monotone that you can feel the narrator's boredom while listening to him. Overall, the narration is not enjoyable. I would definitely not recommend this audiobook to anyone despite its occasionally highly interesting contents.

  • The Life of Greece

  • The Story of Civilization, Volume 2
  • By: Will Durant
  • Narrated by: Stefan Rudnicki
  • Length: 32 hrs and 36 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 29
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 25
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 26

Here Durant tells the whole story of Greece from the days of Crete's vast Aegean empire to the final extirpation of the last remnants of Greek liberty, crushed under the heel of an implacably forward-marching Rome. The dry minutiae of battles and sieges, of tortuous statecraft of tyrant and king, get minor emphasis in what is preeminently a vivid recreation of Greek culture, brought to the listener through the medium of supple, vigorous prose.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent introduction to Greek civilisation

  • By Anfisa on 06-10-16

A Masterpiece

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-12-18

This book has an impressive coverage and authorship. It is remarkably enjoyable as well as informative. I am aware that it can be dated but its depth is still invaluable.

  • The Motivation Toolkit

  • How to Align Your Employees' Interests with Your Own
  • By: David Kreps
  • Narrated by: Chris Sorensen
  • Length: 6 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars 1
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1

Getting your employees to do their best work has never been easy. But it is a particular challenge for knowledge workers, who must attend to many different tasks and whose to-do list is often ambiguous, requiring outside-the-box thinking. Lists of dos and don'ts are rarely effective. Instead, your best bet is to align their interests with your own - the heart of motivation - and set them free to use their own drive and creativity on their, and your, behalf.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Combining Psychology and Economics to Manage

  • By Ras on 12-09-18

Combining Psychology and Economics to Manage

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-09-18

This book overviews important theories from psychology and economics to understand employee motivation. It forms a valuable academic view expressed by simple non-academic phrases that can be read by anyone. The listening experience is hurt by poor narration though. The narrator acts like a computer with scant artistic human touches i his narration. While the narration is still not extremely bad to avoid this book, a better narrator would make a huge difference to enjoy this book. I would recommend this book to managers and students who are interested in people management.

  • The Origins of Political Order: From Prehuman Times to the French Revolution

  • By: Francis Fukuyama
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Davis
  • Length: 22 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 198
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 175
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 171

Virtually all human societies were once organized tribally, yet over time most developed new political institutions which included a central state that could keep the peace and uniform laws that applied to all citizens. Some went on to create governments that were accountable to their constituents. We take these institutions for granted, but they are absent or are unable to perform in many of today’s developing countries—with often disastrous consequences for the rest of the world.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Best explanation of pre-modern Humanity

  • By Alex on 14-12-16

it was a great intellectual pleasure

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 21-05-18

The book is a highly enjoyable one with its extremely intriguing contents. It is about political history of India, China, Arabs, Ottoman Turks and major European nations. On the other hand, the first chapters are on evolutionary psychology of political development. In all respects, I have greatly enjoyed the book. The narration was also excellent.

5 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • The Evolution of Desire

  • By: David M. Buss
  • Narrated by: Greg Tremblay
  • Length: 12 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10

If we all want love, why is there so much conflict in our most cherished relationships? To answer this question we must look into our evolutionary past, argues prominent psychologist David M. Buss. Based one of the largest studies of human mating ever undertaken, encompassing more than 10,000 people of all ages from 37 cultures worldwide, The Evolution of Desire is the first work to present a unified theory of human mating behavior.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Nothing new here

  • By Mr Martin Marais on 23-01-19

wonderful review of evolutionary psychology

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 24-04-18

I have enjoyed every bit of this book. It reviews the scientific knowledge on mating in a very accessible way. The narration is also perfect as much as the quality knowledge it presents.

  • The Man's Guide to Women

  • Scientifically Proven Secrets from the "Love Lab" About What Women Really Want 
  • By: John Gottman, Julie Schwartz Gottman, Douglas Abrams, and others
  • Narrated by: Eric Michael Summerer
  • Length: 5 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 53
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 44
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 42

The Man's Guide to Women offers the science-based answers to the question: What do women really want in men? The book explains the hallmarks of manhood that most women find attractive and helps men hone those skills to be the men women desire.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A good investment...

  • By Amazon Customer on 27-07-16

brilliantly clear and informative

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-02-18

This book is written by academics but it is written in an entertaining non-academic manner. However, it is still highly informative and dependable on scientific knowledge based on evolutionary theory. Its coverage is great and it reads very well. I would definitely recommended this book to any man who wants to increase his understanding of women in a solid, reliable way.

  • The Power of Moments

  • Why Certain Experiences Have Extraordinary Impact
  • By: Chip Heath, Dan Heath
  • Narrated by: Jeremy Bobb
  • Length: 6 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 162
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 145
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 141

The New York Times best-selling authors of Switch and Made to Stick explore why certain brief experiences can jolt, elevate and change us - and how we can learn to create such extraordinary moments in our life and work. What if a teacher could design a lesson that he knew his students would remember 20 years later? What if a doctor or nurse knew how to orchestrate moments that would bring more comfort to patients?

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • touchy stories for service business

  • By Ras on 11-02-18

touchy stories for service business

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-02-18

This book has disappointed me a bit as I was expecting more enlightening discussions. Some sections of the book are interesting but often it does not impress. Many of the points raised in the book are also common sense. There are a few original points only. It involves a lot of touchy stories. The authors are good at telling some meaningful stories but that is all...

22 of 22 people found this review helpful

  • How You Decide: The Science of Human Decision Making

  • By: Ryan Hamilton, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Ryan Hamilton
  • Length: 11 hrs and 50 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 38
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 31
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 28

In How You Decide: The Science of Human Decision Making, Professor Ryan Hamilton, associate professor of marketing at Emory University's Goizueta Business School, uses research revealed via the scientific method to understand and explain human decision making. While his easygoing manner and anecdotes about surprising and bizarre choices will keep you enthralled, Professor Hamilton also shares what decision science has revealed through empirically tested theories.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Much less marketing than I expected

  • By Calum Nobles on 01-12-16

interesting only you know nothing about the topic

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-02-18

This course has an enormous breadth but the coverage per each module is shallow. If you have read just a couple of prominent books about the topic, you can get bored of this course. I pushed really hard to finish the course as an audiobook as it does not have a good narrative and replete with talks on experiment procedures. It is boring to listen to details of each experiment unless you just want to hear stories of experiments one after another. Some basic points ( e.g. type 1 vs type 2) are excessively covered while other more sophisticated points (such as evolutionary psychology) are not explored well. It clearly targets a popular audience which may explain its former positive ratings. Overall, it was not a pleasing listening for me as I was expecting a deeper treatment of the subject.

  • The Fatal Conceit

  • The Errors of Socialism
  • By: F. A. Hayek
  • Narrated by: Everett Sherman
  • Length: 7 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 28
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 23
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 22

Hayek gives the main arguments for the free-market case and presents his manifesto on the "errors of socialism." Hayek argues that socialism has, from its origins, been mistaken on factual, and even on logical, grounds and that its repeated failures in the many different practical applications of socialist ideas that this century has witnessed were the direct outcome of these errors. He labels as the "fatal conceit" the idea that "man is able to shape the world around him according to his wishes."

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A very lucid account of Hayekian views

  • By Ras on 03-01-18

A very lucid account of Hayekian views

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-01-18

I have been reading both socialist and liberalist scholars as a part of my PhD. This book is written in a very lucid and enjoyable style. The narration is also perfect. I can easily argue that this book is the best book to understand Hayekian views as it also summarises many of his earlier texts. Hayek is a real genius. Whether you agree him or not, he has powerful arguments which deserve every bit of intellectual efforts. Hayek mainly advocates for letting people connect together freely in a spontaneous order within traditions to create something magnificent, which cannot be matched by any rational and coercive design dictated by pretence reason. This is not a simple refutation of socialism as the argument has many other merits.

7 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • The Art of the Argument

  • Western Civilization's Last Stand
  • By: Stefan Molyneux
  • Narrated by: Stefan Molyneux
  • Length: 5 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 95
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 88
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 88

The Art of the Argument shocks the dying art of rational debate back to life, giving you the essential tools you need to fight the escalating sophistry, falsehoods, and vicious personal attacks that have displaced intelligent conversations throughout the world. At a time when we need reasonable and empirical discussions more desperately than ever, The Art of the Argument smashes through the brain-eating fogs of sophistry and mental manipulation, illuminating a path to benevolent power for all who wish to take it.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Point perfect in The Argument

  • By Theresa McMeekin on 22-03-18

Very shallow with few wise points to say only

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 28-12-17

The author has some intellectual investment and he has a few good arguments which I cannot deny their common sense value. However, overall this book is full of shallow information and it seriously lacks an academic depth. It rhetorically appeals to feelings of layman. This is not necessarily a bad thing but the book markets itself with higher expectations. Besides, its title is misleading and extremely overrates the value of the book.The author starts with demeaning all academic knowledge on argumentation but then engage himself with them in a very primitive way to support his cases. I do not claim that the book is devoid of any meaningful points. However, the book's points can easily be captured in half an hour. It does not say much about argumentation per se. Rather, the book emphasises the value of argumentation as a means of proper political discussions, which are then used to promote liberalism as if all against liberalism were sophists. I am open to all political ideas and I wish to hear their merits and weaknesses. I had known beforehand that the author has political biases but the lack of depth of his arguments frustrated and bored me. I definitely do not recommend this book to anyone who wants to read intellectually engaging material. I was misled by many high ratings given to this book.

10 of 18 people found this review helpful