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Matt

Penarth, United Kingdom
  • 5
  • reviews
  • 3
  • helpful votes
  • 11
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  • Lord Arthur Savile's Crime and Other Stories

  • By: Oscar Wilde
  • Narrated by: Derek Jacobi
  • Length: 6 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 35
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 28
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 29

Lord Arthur Saviles's Crime is a masterpiece of polished cynicism, in which poison, explosive clocks and finally murder forerun married bliss. Each of the eight stories here were published in the heyday of Wilde's career, between 1887 and 1891.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Funny and touching

  • By steve on 14-05-15

wonderfully entertaining

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-07-14

Derek Jacobi reading classic stories by Oscar Wilde, it doesn't get much better than that!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Playing the Enemy

  • By: John Carlin
  • Narrated by: Saul Reichlin
  • Length: 9 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 60
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 42
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 43

Ellis Park in Johannesburg, 24 June 1995. The Springboks versus The All Blacks in the Rugby World Cup final. Nelson Mandela steps onto the pitch wearing a Springboks shirt and, before a global audience of millions, a new country is born. This book tells the incredible story of Mandela's journey to that moment.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • So good, I listened twice.

  • By Nicholas on 18-07-10

Outstanding

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 30-04-14

I read John Carlins original book in hardback when it came out and enjoyed it so that I went straight out and read a long walk to freedom..
This is the first time I've listened to an audiobook version of a book I've read. Boy am I glad I got the audiobook as well.
The Narrator is fantastic he really brings all the characters to life, even doing a decent impersonation of Desmond tutu.

my initial interest was in the rugby, and rugby addicts may find some of the rugby explanations a little over simplified, eg even though NZ were overwhelming favourites, South Africa were still genuine contenders for the world cup, not rank outsiders as stated in the book., also making out Joost VdW was a "small lightweight player" in painting the picture of his famous tackle on Lomu. There is also no mention of the all blacks alleged food poisoning, But these are trivialities in the great scope of the book.

For me RWC final 1995 stands alongside the Rumble in the jungle in terms of sporting events that have transcended the sport itself and actually become part of history.

There is so much to commend this audiobook, As a welsh rugby fan I was completely able to identify with the stories relating to Die Stem, Nkosi sikelele afrca and shosoloza. Can you imaging trying to persuade a Welshman to sing swing low sweet chariot.

Its no surprise that Hollywood has turned it into a movie, it has everything.

The only people who might not enjoy the content are die hard supporters of Margaret Thatcher and Ronald Reagan (enough said!)





2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Guns of August

  • By: Barbara W. Tuchman
  • Narrated by: John Lee
  • Length: 18 hrs and 59 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 51
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 44
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 42

Historian and Pulitzer Prize-winning author Barbara Tuchman here brought to life again the people and events that led up to World War I. With attention to fascinating detail, and an intense knowledge of her subject and its characters, Ms. Tuchman reveals, for the first time, just how the war started, why, and why it could have been stopped but wasn't. A classic historical survey of a time and a people we all need to know more about, The Guns of August will not be forgotten.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Diplomacy & Battle

  • By Lord Peridot on 21-05-16

Essential listening

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-03-14

With the centenary of the outbreak of the great war, there is a plethora of new literature on the subject. The guns of august still stands tall as an outstanding introduction to the reasons behind WW1.

I wasn't sure about the narrator initially, but after the 1st chapter I got used to his voice(s) and by the end was enthralled.

Importantly the book examines the personalities involved and their various traits and flaws. Perhaps inadvertently it gives possibly the best arguments against hereditary monarchies I've ever heard.

It is all encompassing and covers a huge range of issues, without ever becoming over technical, a fault which sometimes exists with histories written by military men.

The story builds almost like a Tolstoy epic, starting with the funeral of Edward VII and references to the Franco Prussian war, through the July crisis and ending with the critical
Battle of the Marne and the taxi cab army.

As with most audiobook histories it helps to have some knowledge of the geography of where the key actions take place, but it is not essential.

Hugely important events like the flight of the battleship Geoben and the battle of tanneberg which had enormous implications for the war as a whole but which are relatively unknown in the west are covered with a clear examination of the individual characters involved and an appreciation of the wider impact of their actions.

There are a couple of minor annoyances which I am prepared to forgive.

Mrs Tuchman is a little over gushing in her praise of Winston Churchill in my opinion. My opinion of Churchill having been shaped somewhat by stories told to me by my Grandfather, a welsh miner who fought on the Somme.

Also Mrs Tuchman as an American lady writing in the 1960's, constantly refers to Great Britain as England. e.g. England's response to the German invasion of Belgium

For anyone wanting an understanding of the causes of the great war, I can think of no better starting point than the Guns of August

  • Drive

  • The Surprising Truth about What Motivates Us
  • By: Daniel H. Pink
  • Narrated by: Daniel H. Pink
  • Length: 5 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 807
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 653
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 648

A book that will change how you think and transform how you live.Forget everything you thought you knew about how to motivate people – at work, at school, at home. It is wrong. As Daniel H. Pink explains in his paradigm-shattering book Drive, the secret to high performance and satisfaction in today’s world is the deeply human need to direct our own lives, to learn and create new things, and to do better by ourselves and the world.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Essential motivational theory reading

  • By Elizabeth on 17-04-11

thought provoking

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 13-02-14

The author talks with passion and with reference to a wealth of research on a number of aspects of motivation.
It goes against an lot of perceived wisdom and current business practise, but it all makes sense and flows very well.
I found myself agreeing with the author on most things, but then again I am right brained myself.

It may help to have an introductory knowledge of motivation theories, NLP, left /right brain science but its not essential.

I will certainly seek out other works by Daniel pink and other authors he references, particularly the Hungarian whose name I can neither pronounce or spell.

  • The Secret Race

  • Inside the Hidden World of the Tour de France: Doping, Cover-ups, and Winning at All Costs
  • By: Tyler Hamilton, Daniel Coyle
  • Narrated by: Sean Runnette
  • Length: 11 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 622
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 463
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 463

On a fateful night in 2009, Tyler Hamilton and Daniel Coyle met for dinner at a restaurant in Boulder, Colorado. The two had met five years before while Coyle was writing his best-selling book Lance Armstrong: Tour de Force. But this time, Tyler had something else on his mind. He finally wanted to come clean, about everything: the doping, the lying, his years as Lance Armstrong's teammate on U.S. Postal,, and his decade spent running from the truth. "I'm sorry," he told Coyle. "It just feels so good to be able to talk about this. I've been quiet for so many years."

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great story even if you are not a bike racing fan

  • By Bettym on 19-03-13

Fantastic stuff

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-02-14

This is my first every audio book, and what a book to choose.

A fantastic no holds barred insight into the murky behind the scenes world of doping and drug taking in pro cycling. Tyler Hamilton should be applauded and congratulated for having the moral courage to tell the truth about it all.

I now see the fantastic tour battles between Armstrong and ullrich in a different light. I even have some sympathy for Armstrong because everyone was at it.

it also provides a fascinating insight into the win at all cost mentality of sportsmen like Armstrong

Well narrated and compulsive listening, its made my commute a pleasure over the last fortnight