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F. J. Gilbert

London
  • 3
  • reviews
  • 10
  • helpful votes
  • 5
  • ratings
  • The Castle

  • By: Franz Kafka
  • Narrated by: Allan Corduner
  • Length: 13 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 57
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 48
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 48

A land-surveyor, known only as K., arrives at a small village permanently covered in snow and dominated by a castle to which access seems permanently denied. K.'s attempts to discover why he has been called constantly run up against the peasant villagers, who are in thrall to the absurd bureaucracy that keeps the castle shut, and the rigid hierarchy of power among the self-serving bureaucrats themselves.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Loved it

  • By Mark on 09-02-14

Outstanding

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-02-14

Where does The Castle rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

One of the best.

What was one of the most memorable moments of The Castle?

Very funny description of the main character, K, waking up in the night to find one of his assistants in bed with him instead of his wife, and then having to deal with the aftermath of this incident the next morning.

What about Allan Corduner’s performance did you like?

An excellent reader, reminding me of Jon Pertwee in style.

Did you have an emotional reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

It is both funny and sad, but creates a menacing tone throughout.

4 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Of Mice and Men

  • By: John Steinbeck
  • Narrated by: Clarke Peters
  • Length: 3 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,073
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 908
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 902

Streetwise George and his big, childlike friend Lennie are drifters, searching for work in the fields and valleys of California. They have nothing except the clothes on their back, and a hope that one day they’ll find a place of their own and live the American dream. But dreams come at a price. Gentle giant Lennie doesn’t know his own strength, and when they find work at a ranch he gets into trouble with the boss’s daughter-in-law. Trouble so bad that even his protector George may not be able to save him....

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Very enlightening

  • By KAREN on 10-09-11

An interesting reading -- and good for teachers

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 23-12-12

I played this audio reading of Of Mice and Men to my GCSE class and was extremely grateful because it saved me losing my voice. The novel does need to be read well to come alive -- reading the whole thing around the class just doesn't quite work. The reader takes it at a very slow pace, capturing the voices of Lennie, George, and Slim with real subtlety. Some of my class complained about the overly American accent -- but that's the whole point!!

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • A Tale of Two Cities (Dramatised)

  • By: Charles Dickens, Mike Walker (dramatisation)
  • Narrated by: Robert Lindsay, Alison Steadman, Jonathan Coy, and others
  • Length: 3 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 33
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 22
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 22

From the echo of the first line ‘It was the best of times, it was the worst of times’ to the final ‘It is a far far better thing that I do than I have ever done’, Dickens’ classic novel of the French revolution tells a story of the redemptive powers of love in the face of cruelty, violence and neglect.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • An excellent radio adaptation of Dickens classic

  • By F. J. Gilbert on 23-12-12

An excellent radio adaptation of Dickens classic

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 23-12-12

This is an evocative and sharp-paced adaptation of Dickens' classic novel, which many rate to be one of his best. The plot is full of twists and turns, and generates real suspense. Robert Lindsay is good as the narrator Dickens, while the main role of Sydney Carton is played with real sophistication; we get a sense of a genuinely tormented protagonist, struggling with alcoholism and depression. The adaptation brings out the core ideas in Dickens' text; the conflict between personal loyalty and loyalty to the state.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful