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Mr Rupert Seymour

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  • 93
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  • 59
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An extraordinary story you must stay with.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-07-20

From Philip Kerr I was expecting just the usual high quality Kerr story. This is different, still a quality story though delivered through the mouths of different people working on very contrasting levels. At first I was irritated with its structure but that was my problem with not dealing with a strangely, odd creature. I stuck with it and learned much. At times the sharp cleverness and knotted philosophical game playing can seem very nerdy and pretentious but it's all essential in the movement of the story. I recommend this to those listeners tired of simple whodunit stories , 'cos this ain't

A lockdown special.

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 21-06-20

Having heard and read all the Reacher stories, I find it difficult, almost alien, to write that this is a dreary, rambling,empty contribution to the genre. Reacher is no paragon of virtue but tedious he isn't...here he is. Jeff Harding is, for me the voice of Reacher. Jeff does, as always, a great job, but even as an exemplar of the narrators craft he must have found this book a trial. The characters were light, the plot, such as it was, is so stretched that it verges on invisibility. I believe Lee Child has ended his connection with Reacher, allowing another writer to take on the 6'5" mantle of our once amiable rough neck. I live in hope he does not take this book as a pattern on which to model future tales.

A fiction disconcertingly reflected in reality

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 17-02-20

Jon Culshaw has the voice, the manic inflections, the tenor and tone of this vacuous schoolboy. Lucien Young must know his subject as much as thinking citizens can see through the empty promises and lies that amount to the leaders 'successes'.
I read the book and then heard the audio. I managed to smile at the printed pages before the gravity of the truths it spoke, hit me. The audio is a fine work. Everyone should hear this and wonder where the winds of narcissism will drive us. The schoolboys extreme selfishness, his grandiose view of his own talents and a craving for admiration is worrying.

1 person found this helpful

Reacher's getting slightly past his best.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 23-11-19

I've heard and read nearly all Reacher tales and bit by bit they have become clunkier. Full of clever observations and monosyllabic utterances but essentially passionless. Certainly, in that huge frame there beats the heart of a white knight, but one that draws on his battering reputation than to any great movement. Lee Child still writes an engaging story, however, Reacher has become slightly dusty. Oh, don't get me wrong, I enjoyed it and to hear the master narrator, Mr Harding, spin the story, makes it a winner, but Lee Child should take his thinking, muscled hero and give him a pep talk.

Brilliant story...what a tangle of crimes!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-08-19

Harry is not THE role model for the anti-alcohol establishment... when sober he's morose, when drunk he has moments of great insight that draws the listener with him. You have to negotiate the grey in-between world that a suffering soul experiences...his grief of lost love, the struggling to maintain his tenuous hold of a reality others can't or won't understand. Above all this angst and ennui makes a superb detective. Flawed and damaged but a policemen who ultimately gets his man.
Sean Barrett is THE Jo Nesbo reader. A masterly rendition. I have now heard this recording three times, never fails to amaze me just how the incidences have been woven into a glorious whole.

A slow avalanche of complexities.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 14-07-19

I have read and listened to all the Mick Herron stories and slowly became familiar with the characters and their ways. I feel I know them personally...some like Lamb are both rude and smelly. When Joe Country came along I greeted it with open arms. Every element of a Herron story was there but so was a labyrinthine chill that whispered, "Don't get lost 'cos you'll not get to the end". Too many intrusions by unknown characters who sat uncomfortable alongside the usual losers. Whilst I loved and followed the plot, I found a slight element of dissatisfaction creeping in. There is little doubt that this is a well crafted story but be on your guard against inattention...as you'll lose the plot.

Dreary and Robotic...

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 23-04-19

Having been a fan of Ian McEwan's for years, and now having heard his latest offering, I have to express disappointment in this work. Perhaps it's the lack lustre reading by Billy Howie or the dullness of the story that made me feel as though I was wasting my time. I have heard good reviews of this work on the wireless, inspiring interviews and a host of cleverness spoken by pundits and McEwan regarding the existential depth of machine intelligence versus us breathing creatures: sorry it's still an uninspiring audiobook.

19 people found this helpful

Heroes, traitors, blood and compassion...a wonder

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-03-19

A masterly account of how wars are fought...not just with the sword but more with sleight of hand, dishonesty and mendacity.

Simon Scarrow is both a historian and spinner of fine, complicated stories. Jonathan Keeble is a fine voice actor who brings both colour and a special energy to Simon's words.

Lee Child should bow his head in shame.

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 24-02-19

I have either read or heard nearly all Child's Reacher tales. This dreary story had so much repetition of daft conversations from the two 'victims' - both seemingly subject to arrested development. Two badly drawn adults deserving the world's condemnation for their utter shallowness...added to the tedium of this story. Jeff Harding did his best, as he always does, to add colour and gravitas, but at times, even the master was hard put to keep my concentration on board.
My advise would be to save your money, credits and time.

1 person found this helpful

Reacher at his thinking best

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 15-02-19

At last we encounter the thinking Reacher, certainly he can still break arms and eliminate those who need to be eliminated, however, this story shows us a different and more cerebra hero. Lee Child has developed his character to negotiate strategies that are very complex and, at times, unbelievable though in the context of the story, necessary. The characterisation through the voice of Jeff Harding, is as usual, brilliant. Without our favourite reader Reacher would be a pale ersatz of the real man.