LISTENER

M. G. Penfold

Stirling UK
  • 6
  • reviews
  • 21
  • helpful votes
  • 8
  • ratings
  • The Hundred-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out of the Window and Disappeared

  • By: Jonas Jonasson
  • Narrated by: Peter Kenny
  • Length: 10 hrs and 59 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,845
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,303
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,294

Sitting quietly in his room in an old people's home, Allan Karlsson is waiting for a party he doesn't want to begin: his one-hundredth birthday party. Escaping through his bedroom window, into the flowerbed, Allan makes his getaway. And so begins his picaresque and unlikely journey involving criminals, several deaths, a suitcase full of cash, and incompetent but very human police.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fantastically Odd

  • By Oliver Dayman on 29-05-13

Escape from the Care Home

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 15-08-14

Which scene did you most enjoy?

The unlikely body count

Any additional comments?

This novel uses real historical events and weaves them into a funny (very) series of events of a mans life. My late mother was incarcerated in a care home and hated it, like the main character she escaped only her tale was not nearly as adventurous. A real dig at our culture of "health and safety" and "we know what is best for you".

  • Great Britain's Great War

  • A Sympathetic History of Our Gravest Folly
  • By: Jeremy Paxman
  • Narrated by: Roy McMillan, Jeremy Paxman
  • Length: 9 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 381
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 346
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 338

Penguin presents the unabridged, downloadable audiobook edition of Jeremy Paxman's Great Britain's Great War. Read by the actor Roy McMillan, this magnificent history of the First World War tells the story of the war in one gripping narrative from the point of view of the British people. We may think we know about it, but what was life really like for the British people during the First World War?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Highly accessible social history of the Great War

  • By Bromide Badger on 26-01-15

Well read and well researched

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 15-08-14

If you could sum up Great Britain's Great War in three words, what would they be?

Enlightening and moving

Any additional comments?

Both my grandfathers served and survived in that war and to be honest I had no idea what they had gone through, if nothing else Paxman's book certainly clarified that with descriptions of trench life and death. The social comment on that period of time is fascinating a very different world of duty to King and country compared to now. The book also deals with life after the war and the very different place Britain and her empire had become. There does not seem to be much doubt in Paxman's mind this war is the beginning of the end of the British Empire and perhaps the UK itself. I found this an excellent book and will probably revisit again.

7 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • Cat Out of Hell

  • By: Lynne Truss
  • Narrated by: Mike Grady
  • Length: 5 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 108
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 95
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 95

A cottage on the coast on a windy evening. Under a pool of yellow light, two figures face each other across a kitchen table. A man and a cat. The story about to be related is so unusual yet so terrifyingly plausible that it demands to be told in a single sitting. The man clears his throat, and leans forward, expectant. 'Shall we begin?' says the cat….

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Unusually gripping

  • By mollymoon1 on 21-03-14

E cel lent

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-04-14

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

An excellent listen well written and read with good humour and dark twists, if you are not a cat person and find them a bit scary this may just confirm all your fears

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Ocean at the End of the Lane

  • By: Neil Gaiman
  • Narrated by: Neil Gaiman
  • Length: 5 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,684
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,550
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,555

The Ocean at the End of the Lane is a fable that reshapes modern fantasy: moving, terrifying and elegiac - as pure as a dream, as delicate as a butterfly's wing, as dangerous as a knife in the dark - from storytelling genius Neil Gaiman. It's about memory and magic and survival, about the power of stories and the darkness inside each of us. It began for our narrator forty years ago when the family lodger stole their car and committed suicide in it, stirring up ancient powers best left undisturbed.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Cunning Darkness

  • By Simon on 08-10-15

A story with depth

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 16-09-13

What did you like most about The Ocean at the End of the Lane?

The story unfolded revealing just a little at a time from almost a child's fairy tale into something much much darker with many twists and turns as the story unfolds. Neil Gaiman makes a good job of the narration.

6 of 8 people found this review helpful

  • Neverwhere

  • A BBC Radio Full-Cast Dramatisation
  • By: Neil Gaiman
  • Narrated by: Christopher Lee, James McAvoy, Natalie Dormer, and others
  • Length: 3 hrs and 48 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,286
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1,204
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,202

A BBC Radio six-part adaptation of Neil Gaiman's best-selling novel, starring James McAvoy as Richard and Natalie Dormer as Door. Beneath the streets of London there is another London. A subterranean labyrinth of sewers and abandoned tube stations. A somewhere that is Neverwhere....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fantastic Adaptation

  • By flubb on 08-01-15

Captivated

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 16-09-13

Would you listen to Neverwhere again? Why?

Yes I'd listen again and probably again after that. The dramatisation was excellent, the only very minor criticism was the sound recording at the beginning where I missed some of the dialogue. The actors were excellent as was the storey line. I listened to the whole book in one go.

What was one of the most memorable moments of Neverwhere?

The fantasy locations and use of real locations turning them into something completely different, who would have thought Kightsbridge could be a really dodgy place named The Nights Bridge" where your nightmares can be found.

6 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • Wool

  • Wool Trilogy, Book 1
  • By: Hugh Howey
  • Narrated by: Susannah Harker
  • Length: 16 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,306
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,136
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,132

An epic story of survival at all odds and one of the most anticipated books of the year. In a ruined and hostile landscape, in a future few have been unlucky enough to survive, a community exists in a giant underground silo. Inside, men and women live an enclosed life full of rules and regulations, of secrets and lies. To live, you must follow the rules. But some don't. These are the dangerous ones; these are the people who dare to hope and dream, and who infect others with their optimism.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Couldn't stop listening

  • By Niamh on 23-01-13

Gave Up

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-09-13

Would you try another book written by Hugh Howey or narrated by Susannah Harker?

Probably Not

What was most disappointing about Hugh Howey’s story?

The initial story was good, I realised from another review this was a short story with a twist which to be fair wasn't bad. The preceding chapters just went on too long and was not really consistent with technologies that the society in the silo had. No lifts or escalators on 150 floors! yet they have an oil well, a dedicated server environment and other advanced technologies. I got bored with the navel gazing I gave up chapter 12 or was it 14? I may give it another go which will be the third attempt. As for the other novels in the trilogy - not a chance.

Would you listen to another book narrated by Susannah Harker?

No

If you could play editor, what scene or scenes would you have cut from Wool?

Make it abridged