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LJ

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  • The Case for Jesus

  • The Biblical and Historical Evidence for Christ
  • By: Brant Pitre, Robert Barron - afterword
  • Narrated by: Mark Deakins
  • Length: 7 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 21
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 20
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 20

Over the past hundred years, scholars have attacked the historical truth of the Gospels and argued that they were originally anonymous and filled with contradictions. In The Case for Jesus, Brant Pitre taps in to the wells of Christian scripture, history, and tradition to ask and answer a number of different questions, including: If we don't know who wrote the Gospels, how can we trust them? How are the four Gospels different from other Gospels, such as the lost Gospel of "Q" and the Gospel of Thomas?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Exceptional Book for anyone who is interested in Jesus Robert has a great mind and is a brilliant communicator

  • By Kevin on 23-05-16

Brilliant!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 28-08-18

An solid piece of great scholarly work written in an intelligible and passionate language by this brilliant professor.

A must read for all Catholics, heretics and inquisitive sceptics alike.

  • The Popes

  • A History
  • By: John Julius Norwich
  • Narrated by: Michael Jayston
  • Length: 21 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 257
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 166
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 161

Well known for his histories of Norman Sicily, Venice, the Byzantine Empire and the Mediterranean, John Julius Norwich has now turned his attention to the oldest continuing institution in the world, tracing the papal line down the centuries from St Peter himself – traditionally (though by no means historically) the first pope – to the present Benedict XVI.Of the 280-odd holders of the supreme office, some have unques­tionably been saints; others have wallowed in unspeakable iniquity.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Stroll through 2,000 Years of European History

  • By R on 15-09-11

Anti-Catholic rant

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 20-05-16

What disappointed you about The Popes?

The fact that, despite the assurances of the author to the contrary in his introduction, the book is deeply biased, and his negative feelings towards the Catholic Church are made clear to the reader in a rather unsophisticated manner from the very first chapter. He does warn that he is by no means an expert on the subject, nor a scholar by any standard, but that does not justify the fact that the book is also very poorly researched, even for an amateur.

2 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • The Art of Thinking Clearly

  • Better Thinking, Better Decisions
  • By: Rolf Dobelli
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Keeble
  • Length: 9 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 266
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 228
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 227

Have you ever...Invested time in something that, with hindsight, just wasn't worth it? Overpayed in an Ebay auction? Continued doing something you knew was bad for you? Sold stocks too late, or too early? Taken credit for success, but blamed failure on external circumstances? Backed the wrong horse? These are examples of cognitive biases, simple errors we all make in our day-to-day thinking.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • It is a list

  • By Judy Corstjens on 14-10-14

Disappointment!

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 21-04-15

If this book wasn’t for you, who do you think might enjoy it more?

Robots. Alternatively human beings tired of the whole 'humanity' factor in their lives, looking for discouragement in any endeavour they undertake, wanting their wings clipped and ambitions crushed by a politely arrogant, know-it-all "realist". The message seems to be 'You think you can achieve something extraordinary? Think again."

Which scene did you most enjoy?

The scene where the reader taps 'stop' in the middle of a chapter, deletes the audiobook and gets on with their life, having minimised the damage to their spirit caused by this book.

If you could play editor, what scene or scenes would you have cut from The Art of Thinking Clearly?

I would not have it published.
Some factual or anecdotal analysis was interesting, but sadly not much of it unbiased. The author's views are cynical and, in my opinion, silently destructive. Avoid at all costs.

Any additional comments?

Please, do not promote this book - it encourages mediocrity at best. I love the narrator though (Jonathan Keeble) and will seek out more books narrated by him. His clearly articulated RP and engaged reading style is the only reason I gave the book two stars, not one.

2 of 4 people found this review helpful