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Richard

United Kingdom
  • 5
  • reviews
  • 12
  • helpful votes
  • 6
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  • Children of Dune

  • By: Frank Herbert
  • Narrated by: Scott Brick, Simon Vance
  • Length: 16 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 710
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 500
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 499

The sand-blasted world of Arrakis has become green, watered, and fertile. Old Paul Atreides, who led the desert Fremen to political and religious domination of the galaxy, is gone. But for the children of Dune, the very blossoming of their land contains the seeds of its own destruction. The altered climate is destroying the giant sandworms, and this in turn is disastrous for the planet's economy.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A different experience

  • By Richard on 19-06-12

A different experience

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-06-12

Dune is possibly my favourite book of all time and opened my eyes to many things completely unexpectedly. The Dune saga is something I have read over and over. Listening to Children of Dune was actually a completely new experience of the text for me and I think I absorbed so much more than reading it by hand that I feel I've almost read a different book with a different thrust and am happy to have done so as some side characters seemed to jump into the limelight when before I had almost glossed over them and the following novel has a new gravitas for me that it didn't before.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Reamde

  • By: Neal Stephenson
  • Narrated by: Malcolm Hillgartner
  • Length: 38 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 983
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 776
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 781

Richard Forthrast created T’Rain, a multibillion-dollar, massively multiplayer online role-playing game. But T’Rain’s success has also made it a target. Hackers have struck gold by unleashing REAMDE, a virus that encrypts all of a player’s electronic files and holds them for ransom. They have also unwittingly triggered a deadly war beyond the boundaries of the game’s virtual universe - and Richard is at ground zero.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • This virus really infected me!

  • By Samuel on 08-11-11

Read Me Now

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-06-12

Looking for something fast paced, action packed and with a modern now-shock theme, look no further. ReaMde is a gung ho ride form start to finish. The narration for the majority is good, but a UK citizen will be listening in wonderment to some of the "accents" portrayed from our shores but its all in good fun and the characters are likeable and easy to imagine. The story arc is contrived and more of a comic novel than a work of insight so although the plot becomes awkward and slightly ridiculous at the end, one just has to go along with the ride and consume buckets of virtual popcorn for the summer blockbuster yarn this tries and succeeds at being. Don't wait too long to read this as the concepts are already becoming fact and it really is a novel of yester-moment. Fun and frothy but flighty. One for the beach.

  • Perdido Street Station: New Crobuzon, Book 1

  • By: China Mieville
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Oliver
  • Length: 31 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 431
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 324
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 320

Beneath the towering bleached ribs of a dead, ancient beast lies New Crobuzon, a squalid city where humans, Re-mades, and arcane races live in perpetual fear of Parliament and its brutal militia. The air and rivers are thick with factory pollutants and the strange effluents of alchemy, and the ghettos contain a vast mix of workers, artists, spies, junkies, and whores. In New Crobuzon, the unsavory deal is stranger to none—not even to Isaac, a brilliant scientist with a penchant for Crisis Theory.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Slough of pugnaciously ineluctable ululation

  • By Martin on 21-05-13

An experience more than a novel

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-06-12

Perdido station demands your full attention and a lot of your time, and if you have it you will be transported elsewhere to experience slowly the unfolding of an over detailed but satisfying story that will ask you to suspend disbelief and if you do, reward you with a tale full of thoughtful observations, twists and more ideas than are necessary. The text could do with some serious editing down in places as the pace picks up and the brakes are slammed on to describe something with such endless profundity that I was tempted to press fast forward but forced myself not to. The narration starts oddly and it put me off until I had more time and decided to give it another go, this was the right decision because the narrators voice changes dramatically after the intro and once past that characterisation the story begins with a more accessible voice that rapidly drew me in to the world that had been created. There are some oddities as others have described with regards to levels of technology that appear to be uncharacteristically backward in relation to others but one has to just accept this is the way it is for those and marvel at the other concepts that surpass it throughout the unfolding narration. Far better than I expected having tried to read it in paper book form and having given up not understanding the unique world that China Mieville has brought forth.

  • My Family and Other Animals

  • By: Gerald Durrell
  • Narrated by: Nigel Davenport
  • Length: 10 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 614
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 478
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 479

This memoir is soaked in the sunshine of Corfu, where Gerald Durrell lived as a boy, surrounded by his eccentric family - as well as puppies, toads, scorpions, geckoes, ladybugs, glowworms, octopuses, bats, and butterflies.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Animal Anecdotes

  • By Kindle Customer on 21-08-07

I'm glad I waited

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-06-12

Here's a book that presented itself to me over and over throughout my years yet somehow I never found it the moment to read until now. The narration is superb, the characters funny and warm and its a total escape back to a simpler pre-war idyll. I'm glad I came to it as an audiobook because the characterisation and the measured approach forces one to listen and experience it at the correct pace and to revel in the warm breezes that stir the pages. I have decided to postpone listening to the further books because this one was so complete and satisfying on its own that I don't want to dilute the experience. Most enjoyable like a glass of ouzo on a hot summers day..

8 of 8 people found this review helpful

  • A Hunger for the Infinite

  • A Galactic Center Story
  • By: Gregory Benford
  • Narrated by: Robin Sachs
  • Length: 1 hr and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars 9
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 3
  • Story
    2.5 out of 5 stars 3

A Hunger for the Infinite, which first appeared in Robert Silverberg's Far Horizons anthology, is a novella that takes place in the universe of "The Galactic Center Saga", detailing a galactic war between mechanical and biological life. Here, the pilots had made it to True Center in order to destroy something, anything, important to the Mechs, but Paris had something else on his mind. A story of the Mantis, and the decline of humans beginning in 3600 AD.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • An unexpected pleasure

  • By Richard on 19-06-12

An unexpected pleasure

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-06-12

This was a freebie that caught my attention and so I grabbed it. The narration is excellent, the short story visceral and enjoyable. It treads no new ground but is a pleasurable listen that pulled me into its universe and took me out of my own for an enjoyable period. I wish the rest of the Mech series was available on here now as I would listen to them all.