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David Jones

UK
  • 6
  • reviews
  • 13
  • helpful votes
  • 7
  • ratings
  • The Little Book of Behavioral Investing

  • How Not to Be Your Own Worst Enemy
  • By: James Montier
  • Narrated by: Sean Pratt
  • Length: 5 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 50
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 38
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 38

A detailed guide to overcoming the most frequently encountered psychological pitfalls of investing. Bias, emotion, and overconfidence are just three of the many behavioral traits that can lead investors to lose money or achieve lower returns. Behavioral finance, which recognizes that there is a psychological element to all investor decision-making, can help you overcome this obstacle.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • helps to better control emotion

  • By steven Buckley on 21-01-13

behave!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 25-07-18

just the right length. covers the main bad habits that all investors must work to overcome - habits that probably served cavemen very well, but routinely cause investors to lose money.
Montier is clearly a very good writer, and his style translates well to audiobook format.

  • Bitcoin

  • The Future Of Money?
  • By: Dominic Frisby
  • Narrated by: Dominic Frisby
  • Length: 6 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 68
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 61
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 61

In 2008, while the world was busy panicking about the global financial crisis, a computer programmer going by the name of Satoshi Nakamoto posted a message on an out-of-the-way mailing list. 'I've been working on a new electronic cash system,' he said. Nobody seemed to care. ‘It might make sense to get some just in case it catches on,’ he suggested. How right he was. What he had programmed would become the world’s most famous alternative currency – Bitcoin.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Easy to understand, yet technically spot on

  • By Simon on 11-09-17

a good place to start.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 14-05-17

An engaging and well researched introduction to bitcoin and beyond.
This book focuses more on the underlying philosophy of bitcoin, and covers the technical side without getting bogged down in the details.
Frisby is clearly excited about the world-changing potential of blockchain tech, but he's careful to present the 'bear case' for why you should not rush out and fill your boots.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • An Encyclopaedia of Myself

  • By: Jonathan Meades
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Meades
  • Length: 12 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 53
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 52
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 52

'Nothing wilfully invented. Memory invents unbidden.' The 1950s were not grey. In Jonathan Meades's detailed, petit-point memoir they are luridly polychromatic. They were peopled by embittered grotesques, bogus majors, vicious spinsters, reckless bohos, pompous boors, suicides. Death went dogging everywhere.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent if you're deaf in one ear

  • By Anonymous User on 23-12-18

tvSSFBM BVEJP

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 22-02-15

I'm glad I opted for the audio book, rather than the print version. The fact that the author narrates this work allows it to be closer in format to his television documentaries. Abroad in sound, the 12" version. I don't know why that should have surprised me, but it did.

It ticks all the boxes for a Meades program (I'm won't try to list them). Panoramic views with himself talking to the camera from the middle distance spring clearly to mind.

The characters & themes will be familiar to fans of Meades' other work; uncles Hank & Wangle make appearances, as do classic cars, diversions (is this one a diversion?), new Labour, childhood friends.

  • The Abolition of Britain

  • From Winston Churchill to Princess Diana
  • By: Peter Hitchens
  • Narrated by: Peter Hitchens
  • Length: 8 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 188
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 174
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 172

Prominent English social critic Peter Hitchens writes of the period between the death of Winston Churchill and the funeral of Princess Diana, a time he believes has seen disastrous changes in English life. The Abolition of Britain is bitingly witty and fiercely argued, yet also filled with somber appreciation for what the idea of England has always meant to the West and to the world.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Very Depressing

  • By Anonymous User on 19-12-18

Though much is taken, much abides;

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 21-02-15

This is Peter Hitchens' first book, in which he sets out the framework of his Burkean, Anglican & Conservative view of Britain. It takes the form of a lamentation for the peculiarly English civilisation that spanned the 18th & 19th centuries, and documents the extent to which it was demolished in the 20th. The funerals of Winston Churchill & Diana Spencer are used to bracket the period in which the destruction was most rapid.

There is not a cheerful book, it is clearly not meant to be a balanced account of the postwar period. However, cynicism is tempered with dry wit and it made me laugh in a number of places.

The book seems at least as relevant now as it was when first published. The last chapter deals with the serious possibility of Britain being dissolved into a federation of European states.

Few good writers are also accomplished speakers, let alone feel as passionately about their subject as Peter clearly does. This audio book benefits greatly from being narrated by the author.

5 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • Kant: A Very Short Introduction

  • By: Roger Scruton
  • Narrated by: Kyle Munley
  • Length: 5 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 12
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 9
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9

Kant is arguably the most influential modern philosopher, but also one of the most difficult. Roger Scruton tackles his exceptionally complex subject with a strong hand, exploring the background to Kant's work and showing why the Critique of Pure Reason has proved so enduring.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • To go straight to the deepest depth,

  • By David Jones on 21-02-15

To go straight to the deepest depth,

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 21-02-15

Whilst browsing the reviews of the print version, I noticed phrases like 'hard to follow' & 'difficult subject' but pressed ahead. Having read some other works by Roger Scruton, I was impressed by his ability to capture the essence of difficult subjects and was aware that Kant's philosophy influences much of Roger's own writing.

Unfortunately I cannot claim that listening to chapters 3 to 5 increased my (very modest) understanding of the basics of Kant's philosophy. Listening to those chapters seemed rather like listening to someone narrate computer code. I imagine the audio version of 'Design patterns' by Gamma et al would sound like this.

The problem was exaggerated by the extensive references (to multiple revisions of the source) which accompany every quote from Kant's original work. These are unobtrusive in print, but it was a poor decision to include them in the audio version.

The fault is mainly mine, as I listen to audio books whilst working or driving. I just need to read those chapters for myself, rather than via a narrator.

Quite suddenly, at chapter 6, Roger's distinctive style leaps from the page (speakers), and the rest of the book is everything I hoped the first crucial chapters would be: enlightening & enjoyable.

6 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • Philosophy

  • Who Needs It
  • By: Ayn Rand
  • Narrated by: Lloyd James
  • Length: 10 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 10
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 8
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 8

Who needs philosophy? Ayn Rand's answer: Everyone. This collection of essays was the last work planned by Ayn Rand before her death in 1982. In it, she summarizes her view of philosophy and deals with a broad spectrum of topics. According to Ayn Rand, the choice we make is not whether to have a philosophy, but which one to have: a rational, conscious, and therefore practical one, or a contradictory, unidentified, and ultimately lethal one.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away....

  • By David Jones on 21-02-15

A long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away....

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 21-02-15

The format of this book - a number of essays written by Rand and compiled in the 1980's - provides something of a short cut for those, like me, who prefer concise works of non-fiction.

The author makes frequent use of quotes from characters in her own novels by way of an explanation. This might seem a bit conceited, but we should remember that those novels were intended to form the clearest expression of her philosophy. Plato wrote dialogues, Rand wrote novels. She probably wouldn't have blanched at that comparison.

In addition to being an good introduction to objectivism these essays provide an insight into Rand's view of the history of philosophy, in particular the adversarial nature of two distinct schools of thought - personified on the one hand by John Locke, and by Emmanuel Kant on the other. I could criticise Rand's polarised view of these two schools, as others have, but I think it is a large part of what makes this book so enjoyable.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful