LISTENER

Di

  • 38
  • reviews
  • 140
  • helpful votes
  • 55
  • ratings

Really enjoyed reading the book

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 13-12-18

Wonderfully written, funny and eye opening, this book gives you a comprehensive and honest insight into Danish lifestyle and their secrets of living happily. As a fan of Nordic style, Nordic noir and the Vikings, I really enjoyed reading the book. The Happiness Project is so well researched, Helen Russell is excellent in covering all aspects. At some point in reading I started dreaming about immigrating to Denmark myself :)). And such a happy turn of her life and ending of the book, loved it!

The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society cover art

Wonderful book

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 17-11-18

Wonderful book, beautifully written, full of witty humour. The story (stories) are very touching but the author made them sound entertaining, despite retelling the awfully cruel day to day realities people faced during the WWII and especially the occupation of Guernsey. It made me laugh and also cry from heartbreak thinking of what people had endured and survived through, all the pain and suffering in the war years. It is a wonderful way to remember but also to uncover beauty and romance. The book also made me really interested in the island of Guernsey and wanting to visit there myself.

Wonderful dramatisation

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 30-03-18

I had previously read the books and even so I greatly enjoyed the dramatised stories, the narration and actors are excellent. I also very much enjoyed the interviews with P. D. James at the end of the book, what an admirable woman and writer!

7 people found this helpful

A superb classic mystery

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 28-05-16

If you have read the Murder Room, it would be difficult for you to decide which one is the best of P. D. James and Adam Dalgliesh. A Taste of Death is equally well written and even more complex and interesting, as it is richer in characters. The book would make a good dramatisation, there is the sense that it is the script of a theatrical play, because many of the characters are stereotypical cliches, the inevitable product of their class and circumstance. As usual P. D. James takes us back to a time when class differences were more palpable. But if like me, you are a big fan of British classic mystery, this one is not to be missed. The book is wonderfully written, the mystery slowly unravelled and of course the narration is brilliant.

10 people found this helpful

Ruined the whole series for me! Awful!

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 27-03-16

I used to be a fan of the series before I listened to this book, which ruined all! The series were becoming repetitive and more tedious but in this book Agatha Raisin is more arrogant and blunt than ever! The plot has more murders than you could keep count of, new characters are briefly introduced, after which they either get murdered or become murderers. The author insults freely Polish people and speaks with condescending language towards all Eastern Europeans, or perhaps it is how Penelope Keith is reading it out, either way, it looks really shallow! I am not Polish, but I am both British and European and I'd like to remind both M. C. Beaton and the publishers that English village crime mystery has more fans internationally and in Europe, (including Eastern Europe) rather than in the UK, so really you are ruining your own success! And as just when you think that the book could not get any worse, the plot twist turns out to be ignorant. Spoiler alert: could anyone please tell M. C. Beaton that identical twins cannot be of a different gender, nor do they have a different DNA.

1 person found this helpful

Disappointing, tedious and not mysterious

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 21-02-16

I was looking for a good classic detective story, and this book was suggested in the category, with overall good reviews. Unfortunately, it was quite disappointing for a crime mystery novel. Perhaps, I was expecting a more old fashion book, or a mid. 20th century classic crime, and the book is contemporary. That I think should have been mentioned in the description. I have to say that the writing style is good, so the book does not fail there, but it fails in storyline and mystery. The narrator Steven Pacey was good, although it was odd and confusing to listen to him narrating all women's voices, as the characters introduced in the first half were mostly women. I was critical of some of the reviewers stating that this is not a book a man could enjoy, it sounded very sexist, but I have to agree that many of the descriptions of characters and relations between them were indeed tedious to listen to and had no bearing to the crimes. It is more of a social novel, if you like a fictional description of what life and people are like in a small English town, you may like it. Perhaps what grabbed the attention of some of the listeners was the chance to peek into what could be the private stories of various people, including a very soapy description of undisclosed feelings of love from first sight, and the life in a somewhat small English town. But with a Cathedral, which should have then been called a city, but never mind. Simon Serrailler is not even a main character of the book. There is no mystery of what has happened to the victims and worst of all, you get to find out who the murderer is whole 4 hours before the end of the book, what follows is tedious, there is no mystery or suspense and without giving out any specific spoilers, the ending is quite disappointing.

2 people found this helpful

Gripping and interesting

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 28-11-15

A gripping mystery, and a good story, hard to put down. I was happy to see Tom Douglas being back to his usual self - the white hat. I didn't like him being portrayed as the arrogant, sarcastic copper in Book 2, or perhaps that was down to the narrator. I enjoyed the story, the plot would make a good Hollywood style gangster movie. The lack of closure in the end worried me a little, but perhaps there will be a follow up in the next book. I would love to see another story from Rachel Abbot set in the countryside instead of the city.

24 people found this helpful

Brilliant and so interesting!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 20-09-15

I strongly recommend this book to everyone, even people who are only remotely interested in healthy lifestyle. This brilliant little book offers a glimpse into the hidden world inside us, with up to date scientific knowledge, but told in a simple and entertaining way! Giulia Enders I could not thank you enough for writing this book! I learned a lot! My personal favourite bacteria - L. Bacillus bulgaricus was also mentioned as one of the superstars.
The essence is that alongside better understanding of the processes in your digestive system, this book also gives you practical advice on easy to implement small changes, but with huge benefits for your health.

27 people found this helpful

Didn't enjoy it very much

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-08-15

I tried to conquer my fright of King, as I am not a big fan of horror. Unfortunately, this book also filled me with horror and disgust, and nausea, or maybe this was the aim of the book. It also felt as if the story is written by a ghost writer, I do not want to offend Stephen King's fans, as I cannot claim to have read too many of his books. The style may be the same, but it was all going over the surface, commercial and common, as long as there was something sick thrown in to evoke disgust. A bit like trying to eat a meal, which has started to rot, or gone a bit off, sorry, just not to my taste.

4 people found this helpful

Good Book, good marketing

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-08-15

If you still haven't read this book despite being plastered everywhere you look at, at the platforms, boards, papers, reviews, you can give it a try. If you are interested in Churchill, this book gives a good comprehensive description of his character. Not sure if it might be better to get it in print, as chronologically listening to Boris jumping from date to date, being decades apart, like me, you can get muddled up with the chronological order of events. Otherwise, I much more enjoyed The Johnson's Life of London, this book can be a boring in comparison.

1 person found this helpful