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Petra

  • 25
  • reviews
  • 70
  • helpful votes
  • 156
  • ratings
  • A Mind to Kill

  • A gripping psychological thriller packed with suspense
  • By: John Nicholl
  • Narrated by: Jake Urry
  • Length: 8 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 100
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 92
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 91

When Rebecca's childhood abuser escapes justice, it sets her on a path to revenge. Revenge on any man who preys on the innocent. A gripping, audiobook psychological thriller that will keep you on the edge of your seat.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Perfection

  • By Melanie Preston Lewis on 12-09-17

Perfect

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 13-12-17

This was a dark story on the subject of paedophilia, vengeance, and justice. It was the fourth book by John Nicholl that I have listened to. His writing has become more refined with each one. The story line here is just as sinister and disturbing as in his other books, which have all been gripping combinations of psychological thriller and police procedural.
Although the reader is aware from the outset who the killer is this doesn't diminish the suspense at all, and there are several surprises along the way. It was nice to have DI ‘Grav’ Gravell back. I really like him and his slightly unconventional and grumpy manner.
Jake Urry once again enhanced this story with his usual pitch-perfect performance. To me, this is a perfect narrator – author duo and although a large part of the story is from a female point of view, this really worked faultlessly. Jake’s female voices are believable and the proficient use of different accents makes the characters come to life in a very authentic manner. I will continue to listen to anything they produce.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Unethical Conduct

  • Terry McGuire Series of Thrillers: The Garnwen Trust, Book 1
  • By: Arthur Cole, Nigel C. Williams
  • Narrated by: Jake Urry
  • Length: 3 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 19
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 18
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18

Corrupt senior officers, a murder, a rape, and a flasher. Can DI Terry McGuire's day get any worse? McGuire became a police officer to uphold the law and to protect those who cannot protect themselves. When he discovers a connection between a former friend and colleague, and a body buried on a beach that appears to have been frozen for five years, McGuire knows there is only one course of action he can take.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Outstanding narration!

  • By Melanie Preston Lewis on 26-07-17

Straightforward police procedural

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-08-17

This is the first book about DI Terry McGuire who is an all-round nice chap and not at all like the majority of fictional, broken detectives. That was quite a pleasant change. Set in Wales, DI McGuire is tasked to investigate an allegation into corruption within his force. On top of that, a dead body is discovered on the beach and a flasher is exposing himself near the local caravan park.
So McGuire has a fair bit to deal with, but remains completely unflustered throughout.
Written by two former police officers, their experience shines through clearly in the depiction of the investigative procedures. The characters and the dialogue also seemed very authentic. At times, it actually felt as if I was listening to a memoir. My only minor criticism about the plot was that everything just slotted into place too easily. My second - again minor - niggle relates to the portrayal of female characters. They seemed to be typecast in the classic roles of supportive and nurturing. In future books, it would be nice to see a bit more suspense and perhaps the odd female character that doesn't fit that mould. However, as a first book and serving as an introduction to the series, it was pretty good.

The story is told from the first-person perspective of DI McGuire and Jake Urry's tone of voice fitted that character to a T. The narration definitely enhanced the story for me.

Overall, a short and very straightforward British police procedural, which kept me entertained and held my attention, but was rather undemanding.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Greatshadow

  • The Dragon Apocalypse, Book 1
  • By: James Maxey
  • Narrated by: Jake Urry
  • Length: 13 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 17
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 17
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16

After stealing a priceless relic from the Church of the Book, Infidel is the world’s most infamous mercenary. Now she’s got her eyes on a new prize, the fabled treasure trove of the dragon Greatshadow. Joining forces with a band of dangerous rogues, can she survive her own allies long enough to face the dragon?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Such a lot of fun

  • By Petra on 07-06-17

Such a lot of fun

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-06-17

This was my first ever dragon book, it is also the first book in a four-part series, but it works perfectly fine as a standalone.
Told in first-person, the narrator isn't the protagonist making this quite an original way of relaying the story. Stagger, the narrator, actually dies right at the start of the story. Following his long-term companion around in ghost-format, Stagger tells the story of Infidel, a super strong female mercenary, and his secret love interest.
I really enjoyed Stagger's perspective. He was funny and endearing although he had basically been a drunk and a scoundrel most of his life.
The plot itself is a fairly typical action-adventure quest featuring a group of incompatible rogues setting off to slay a powerful dragon, Greatshadow, the dragon of fire. As I'm generally not a huge fan of fantasy epics, I appreciated that this was fast-paced action and entertainment rather than loads of world building. Characters were introduced with sufficient history and they, as well as the setting, were described thoroughly enough to make it easy to imagine the island, the dragons, the immortals, the orcs etc.
The rather mixed bunch of characters surrounding Infidel were all likeable and fun despite the expected tension within their group. I really enjoyed the "romantic" elements of Infidel's story as well although some of it was getting very close to being cheesy. Still, the arc about Stagger and Infidel's relationship, which neither of them had honestly and fully appreciated until Stagger wasn't alive anymore, was an interesting addition to all the sword wielding action.

Jake Urry brought the characters to life in a spectacular fashion. His dragon voices were menacing, his portrayal of The Three Goons was wonderful, in particular No Face. I like how Jake makes female characters sound believable and not like cartoon-type characters. There was a large cast of characters involved, but it was always clear who was talking due to Jake Urry's differentiation and tones. To be honest, I wouldn't have sat down to read this in book-format, it's just not my thing, but listening to this was phenomenal and so much fun.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Darkside Blues

  • The Ulrich Files, Book 3
  • By: Ambrose Ibsen
  • Narrated by: Jake Urry
  • Length: 5 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15

Though enjoying an increase in business following his last case, life isn't all roses for private investigator Harlan Ulrich. His newest job, another missing person's case, is unlike any other he's ever taken on. Local businessman Michael Poole hires Ulrich to find his estranged daughter. The problem? She's been dead for a decade.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Old fashioned spooky story

  • By Wendy Hellion on 27-05-17

Superbly narrated, atmospheric paranormal mystery

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 20-04-17

Following 'The Sick House' and 'Medicine For The Dead', this is the third book featuring coffee-addicted private investigator Harlan Ulrich. It works fine as a standalone. In the last two books, Ulrich dealt with some frightening cases involving supernatural phenomena that have made him well-known locally and his PI business is finally taking off. When Ulrich is approached by Michael Poole, a rich local businessman, who asks him to investigate the disappearance of his daughter, Ulrich is reasonably happy to take on the case as it appears to be more of a "normal" missing person's case. Of course, it doesn't quite turn out that way, and soon Ulrich is being followed.
Initially, I thought this was going to be quite a straightforward ghost story, but getting further into it, little twists kept coming that made this into a less clear-cut, rather sad, and nicely atmospheric paranormal mystery. I've become quite fond of Harlan Ulrich over the course of the three audiobooks. The way he chats with his cat is pretty endearing and he is an all-round good guy. I enjoy Ambrose Ibsen's descriptive style of writing and the way he creates fear and suspense.
This was a quick and easy listen made even more enjoyable thanks to the excellent narration by Jake Urry. Good range of voices, great pacing and intonation, and just perfect at getting the eerie atmosphere across.

  • The Black Talisman

  • By: Richard Storry
  • Narrated by: Jake Urry
  • Length: 4 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 11
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11

Deep in a deserted forest, a coven of witches is taken by surprise as they attempt to summon the Dark Lord, Anubin, from the spirit world. At his Easter camp, young Gilbert Hawkins has an amazing divine encounter. However, as the subsequent years pass, he and his girlfriend find themselves increasingly the subject of demonic visitations. What is the connection between these seemingly isolated events, over 300 years apart?

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Different

  • By TerryHeth on 08-02-17

Fantastic narration - ok story

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-02-17

This was quite a short audiobook with a mythical, supernatural plot involving demons, angels, witches etc. There were two plot lines, one starting in the early eighties and the other in 1673, which come together in the end.
It was an ok story but never really gripped me. Partly, I think, this is due to the fact that it was too heavy on religion for my taste. I was expecting something scarier and more twisted, but the plot just fizzled out in the end. Much preferred Mr. Storry's debut novel, The Cryptic Lines, to this one.

The narration by Jake Urry was as stellar as ever. His voice is really suited to these dark, mythical stories. But he also did a great job of portraying Monica, the young female protagonist, who sounded very believable. And who knew he could sing as well?!

I chose to listen to this audiobook provided by the narrator and all opinions in this review are my own and completely unbiased.

  • Transmission

  • A Supernatural Thriller
  • By: Ambrose Ibsen
  • Narrated by: Jake Urry
  • Length: 6 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 41
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 40
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 40

College students Kenji and Dylan stumble upon a strange recording in the background of an obscure song. It's a woman's voice uttering a string of seemingly random characters. Upon further inspection, the song appears to have been embedded with a hidden message. Attempting to crack the mysterious code and becoming obsessed with the recording, Kenji and Dylan set off in search of answers. With every turn in the road however, the puzzle only seems to grow more complicated.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Mediocre to stupid

  • By Amazon Customer on 17-01-17

Spine-chillingly good

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 16-11-16

I had to go on a lengthy road trip and thought listening to this in the car would keep me entertained. It did, but next time I drive along dark, isolated country roads on my own for hours on end I might have to pick something less creepy. I had no idea how much this supernatural thriller was going to freak me out. This was my third book by Ambrose Ibsen and definitely my favorite so far. I've listened to several stories narrated by Jake Urry now and I have always commented on how well he does with suspenseful, scary stories. He took it to yet another level with this one!
Transmission is the story of three men, a Vietnam vet and two College guys, who become intrigued by a woman's voice on a recording repeating a seemingly random combination of characters, like a code. They decide to do some research to establish the identity of the woman and as they do, they become increasingly obsessed with the mystery surrounding her and the code.
This is a great book if you enjoy spine-chilling mysteries with supernatural elements. There is nothing gory or explicit, but the author is extremely successful at creating a menacing, dark atmosphere. The narration is first-class, utterly brilliant, but don't listen when you're alone in the dark.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Shadows of Tomorrow

  • By: Jessica Meats
  • Narrated by: Jake Urry
  • Length: 10 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 24
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 24
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 24

Earth is at war. Portals are opening across the planet and bringing creatures known as Outsiders. Their only desire is to eat, leaving a trail of destruction in their path. The only people who can stop them are the Defenders - led by Gareth Walker - who can open portals of their own to target the Outsiders in minutes. Gareth's only advantage is an ability to see glimpses of his future.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Shadows of tomorrow

  • By MeDi on 20-10-16

Enjoyable, fast-paced sci-fi suitable for all ages

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 14-11-16

This exciting science fiction story had a bit of everything: ravenous alien creatures that appear through portals, a skilled group of "defenders" who attempt to protect earth from these monsters, named "The Outsiders"; special powers, fighting and action scenes, betrayal, secrets, and even some romance.
The characters were well developed and I thought the group of defenders was made up of a good variety of different personalities. I enjoyed the relationships and the dialogue among the defenders. In particular, Cassie's story of joining the training to become a defender from her background of having been a successful athlete was interesting. The book was generally well written; the only thing that interrupted the flow a bit were the inserted back stories of each character. They were great for getting to know the characters, but I wished that information had been inserted into the story in a different way.
The end leaves a few things open, presumably to be continued in the sequel "Between Yesterdays".
A very suitable story for a younger audience, clean with regards to language and romance, nothing graphic.
Jake Urry brought the characters to life and made them easily distinguishable through subtle differences. The only thing I was missing here and there was a bit of emotion.
Overall, an easy to follow, suspenseful sci-fi adventure recommended for all ages.

  • Portraits of the Dead

  • By: John Nicholl
  • Narrated by: Jake Urry
  • Length: 8 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 101
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 95
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 94

Emma didn't know how long he hid, silent and unmoving, in the large Victorian wardrobe to the side of her single bed. She didn't know how long he peered out, salivating and drooling, between the two heavy dark oak doors, and watched, mesmerized, as she slowly drifted into fitful sleep. She didn't know what time he pushed the doors open and crept towards her in the drab grey darkness of the night.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Delectably chilling

  • By Vicki Goodwin on 31-10-16

Dark and terrifying with some great twists

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 24-10-16

Following White Is the Coldest Colour, this was the second book written by John Nicholl and narrated by Jake Urry that I have listened to. These two are a fantastic grouping of writer and narrator. John Nicholl has an amazing talent for creating the most disturbing and vile perpetrators in crime fiction, while Jake Urry has this uncanny ability to voice these creepy characters in a way that might leave you locking the doors, turning on the lights and checking all is safe.
Although a standalone novel, Portraits of the Dead sees the return of DCI Gareth Gravel and DS Clive Rankin who featured in White Is the Coldest Colour. They are working in Wales and this time they are investigating the disappearance of 19-year-old Emma, a pretty blonde university student.
Told from multiple perspectives including Emma's and her abductor's, who renames her "Venus Number Six", Mr. Nicholl's writing was more polished in this one. There were none of the little repetitions I complained about previously. Very dark, but not gory, this had me gripped right from the start and even though the identity of the perpetrator was clear from early on, the level of suspense remained high thanks to several shocking developments and a totally unexpected ending. I still can't decide what to make of that ending, but it was certainly surprising and ingenious.
My only minor niggle regarding the plot: there was one character whose actions I found difficult to believe and whose motivation wasn't explained sufficiently. To me, this person's history didn't fit together with their current persona. I don't want to add spoilers so I can't really give any more details.
Loved the narration. Jake Urry's intonation with the skillful use of the accents and his timely pacing were excellent. I wouldn't want to type-cast him but he really puts the evil into depraved characters like few others.
Highly recommended if you enjoy dark, terrifying thrillers.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

Copper's Keeper cover art
  • Copper's Keeper

  • Slaughter Series, Book 3
  • By: A.I. Nasser
  • Narrated by: Jake Urry
  • Length: 4 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 20
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 20
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 20

Every small town in Connecticut has its secrets, but none are as shocking as Melington's. After the riots, Melington becomes the primary target of an FBI investigation. The Council is more ruthless than the town has ever seen. And a national spotlight shines brightly on the mysterious cases of missing children.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Book 3

  • By MeDi on 18-09-16

Great conclusion to an interesting story

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 31-08-16

This was the third and final (?) book in the Slaughter series, which needs to be listened to in order.
As the FBI becomes involved in the case of the events that have shaken up the small town of Melington, Alan Carter's actions in the last book have wide-reaching consequences, and it becomes clear that Alan will be the only person who can put an end to it all.
I absolutely loved the 'Lady in Red', what a wonderfully horrible character.
However, I could have done without the FBI reports that were breaking up the flow of the story for me. Combined with the many changes of perspectives, it just made the story jump about a lot.
I really liked the ending which was very fitting and rather unexpected, excellent for a horror story. The bonus scenes were fantastic. I enjoyed finding out about the fate of the reporter.

The deep and gritty narration was excellent. Another smooth performance by Jake Urry who is fantastic at increasing the menace you feel while listening to this.

I received a free copy in exchange for an honest review.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

Shadow's Embrace cover art
  • Shadow's Embrace

  • Slaughter Series, Book 2
  • By: A.I. Nasser
  • Narrated by: Jake Urry
  • Length: 5 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 21
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 20
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 20

Six months have passed since Alan Carter woke up from the coma Copper Tibet had put him in, and much has changed in Melington. A new chairman, a power-hungry sheriff, a spineless son who struggles with the absence of his father. And children still going missing while the monster taking them roams free and unrestrained. In the small town of secrets, what had once been hidden is now slowly coming to light, and few rest easy, including Alan Carter. He is plagued by nightmares.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Book 2

  • By MeDi on 27-08-16

Fast paced and creepy

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 17-08-16

Shadow's Embrace is the second book in the Slaughter series and picks up six months after Children To The Slaughter. They should really be read (listened to) in order though there are some flashbacks that explain parts of the past.
Alan Carter is still plagued by nightmares from the events six months ago, and while there is a new chairperson of the Council, children are still disappearing. However, when more people find out about what is going on in the little town of Melington and an inquisitive reporter becomes involved, total mayhem ensues, and Alan seems to be the key as "It began with a Carter, and it must end with a Carter". A.I. Nasser introduces new characters and further develops the characters from book 1. The pace remains fast and the atmosphere is wonderfully creepy and suspenseful. I enjoyed this one more than the previous book as the writing has become more refined.
Jake Urry is the perfect narrator for this series, as he boosts the eeriness factor with his spine-chilling delivery. I look forward to Copper's Keeper.

I received a complimentary copy of the audiobook in exchange for an honest review.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful