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Chris Anderson

  • 4
  • reviews
  • 23
  • helpful votes
  • 5
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  • The Uninhabitable Earth

  • A Story of the Future
  • By: David Wallace-Wells
  • Narrated by: David Wallace-Wells
  • Length: 8 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 183
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 164
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 162

It is worse, much worse, than you think. The slowness of climate change is a fairy tale, perhaps as pernicious as the one that says it isn't happening at all, and if your anxiety about it is dominated by fears of sea-level rise, you are barely scratching the surface of what terrors are possible, even within the lifetime of a teenager today.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Serves a purpose, but flawed delivery

  • By Chris Anderson on 04-04-19

Serves a purpose, but flawed delivery

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-04-19

The book clearly has a purpose, to shock the reader/listener into realising just how serious the climate change threat is to the world and how much action is required quickly to slow or stop the damage. In this purpose, the book is very successful. I have finished it in no doubt that climate change is a serious and impending issue.

However, there are two large problems with the book which meant I couldn’t bring myself to give it 5 stars. Firstly, the relentless depressing statistics, whilst serving the overall purpose above, become tiresome after a while. It’s an endless stream of fact and figure about how terrible things could be with very little additional narrative to puncture the onslaught - the message would have been more digestible had there really been some “human” element to it e.g. stories of individual exposure to the effects of a changing climate, rather than blanket global statistics.

Secondly, the later parts of the book, after the statistics, are scattered and without a clear message or structure. He seems to jump from religion, to extra terrestrial life, to politics. I found the end very difficult to follow and found myself looking forward to the last couple of chapters being over.

I think the book will add the cause and inform and encourage activity on climate change, but a 2nd version would do well to improve on the items above to make it even more compelling.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • The Emperor of All Maladies

  • By: Siddhartha Mukherjee
  • Narrated by: Stephen Hoye
  • Length: 20 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 289
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 236
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 233

A comprehensive history of cancer – one of the greatest enemies of medical progress – and an insight into its effects and potential cures, by a leading expert on the illness. In The Emperor of All Maladies, Siddhartha Mukherjee, doctor, researcher and award-winning science writer, examines cancer with a cellular biologist’s precision, a historian’s perspective, and a biographer’s passion. The result is an astonishingly lucid and eloquent chronicle of a disease humans have lived with - and perished from - for more than five thousand years.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I had no idea how little I knew about Cancer

  • By Judy Corstjens on 15-09-11

Painfully, deliberately honest

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 15-08-16

Mukherjee writes from the front lines of the war against cancer. He is clearly both passionate and knowledgeable about his subject, and is a great story teller, weaving patient tales in amongst his historic account of progress in understanding and tackling the disease.

  • Parliament Ltd

  • A journey to the dark heart of British politics
  • By: Martin Williams
  • Narrated by: Esther Wane, Luke Thompson
  • Length: 9 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 224
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 205
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 206

In Parliament Ltd, investigative journalist Martin Williams reveals the true extent of greed and corruption in Westminster. Containing explosive new revelations about the activities of those at the top, this is a shocking untold tale that goes to the rotten heart of British politics.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • painfully exposing the Parliament

  • By Amazon Customer on 03-09-16

Very good journalism, effect is reduced by ideology

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 31-07-16

The journalism here is excellent, strong investigation into parts of the Westminster regime to expose the excesses of politicians which carry on to this day. Some of the information in here is truly unique, such as the detailed summary of company directorships. If you are looking for evidence and fuel to be angry at the political system, look no further.

However, the author does somewhat detract from his main message in places by letting his ideology slip into the book, rather than remaining completely objective. For example, he assumes in one chapter that privatisation of the NHS is bad, without providing any evidence to back up this assertion. But if you can ignore these minor references, it definitely doesn't ruin the books message.

Final point which is audiobook related: the author has clearly added a lot of footnotes in the book to try to absolve himself of libel e.g. "This section does not imply that X has done anything illegal", etc. The narrator has read each of these out, which becomes irritating and ruins the flow of the book.

19 of 23 people found this review helpful

  • In Order to Live

  • A North Korean Girl's Journey to Freedom
  • By: Yeonmi Park
  • Narrated by: Eji Kim
  • Length: 9 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 270
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 248
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 245

Yeonmi Park was not dreaming of freedom when she escaped from North Korea. She didn't even know what it meant to be free. All she knew was that she was running for her life, that if she and her family stayed behind they would die - from starvation or disease or even execution.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fantastic

  • By Eleanor on 29-10-15

An amazing story let down in parts by flat delivery

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 18-03-16

The story is excellent, and a real eye opener into the workings of North Korea. It's harrowing, gripping and very difficult to stop listening to. However, the narration of the story is in a very monotonous manner, with very little emotion in the speakers voice. While this does, in places, reflect the story well, it is very difficult to concentrate on a story being told this way for long periods of time. I found myself drifting on several occasions and it was difficult to keep focuses. A more emotive delivery from a similar speaker would improve the overall result vastly.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful