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Richard

Pembrokeshire, United Kingdom
  • 31
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  • 166
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  • 99
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  • The Ghosts of Altona

  • By: Craig Russell
  • Narrated by: Peter Noble
  • Length: 12 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 73
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 72
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 69

Jan Fabel is a haunted man. Head of the Polizei Hamburg's Murder Commission, Fabel has dealt with the dead for nearly two decades, but when a routine enquiry becomes a life-threatening - and life-changing - experience, he finds himself on much closer terms with death than ever before. Two years later Fabel's first case at the Murder Commission comes back to haunt him: Monika Krone's body is found at last, 15 years after she went missing.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • missed Sean Barrett

  • By lorried on 13-04-17

Spoiled By Narrator

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-09-15

When I purchased this book, I wrongly assumed that the narrator of the previous books, Sean Barrett, would also be narrating the latest offering from Craig Russell. Obviously I was wrong.
I really have to agree with many other reviewer's, the narrator of this title, Peter Noble, is pretty poor. This may not be Craig russell's finest book, but this is the first time that I have not thoroughly enjoyed listening to something written by the author. Peter Noble's narration simply sucked the life out of this audiobook. Ponderous, monotone, with an inability to differentiate the characters. I realise that I'm comparing Mr Noble with the superb, Sean Barrett,quite possibly Mr Noble does a fine job when narrating other genres, but he really is not suited to narrating what is after all,supposed to be a "thriller".

6 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • Watching You

  • By: Michael Robotham
  • Narrated by: Sean Barrett
  • Length: 12 hrs and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,427
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,296
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,301

Marnie Logan often feels like she's being watched. Nothing she can quite put her finger on - a whisper of breath on the back of her neck, or a shadow in the corner of her eye - and now her life is frozen. Her husband Daniel has been missing for more than a year. Depressed and increasingly desperate, she seeks the help of clinical psychologist Joe O'Loughlin. Joe is concerned by Marnie's reluctance to talk about the past, but then she discovers a book packed with pictures, interviews with friends, former teachers, old flames and workmates Daniel was preparing for her birthday.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • First class thriller

  • By Kirstine on 13-09-13

Top Notch Psychological Thriller

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 20-07-15

Michael Robotham has come up trumps once again with this superb psychological thriller.
Psychologist Joe O'lochlin and retired detective Vincent Ruiz become embroiled in the case, when one of O'lochlin's patients, who's husband has been missing for more than a year, becomes the main suspect in a murder case.
Michael Robotham has here crafted a multi layered tale, that deals with the psychological impact of childhood trauma and in particular, the way it affects the victims as adults.
Written with great precision, the author steadily builds the tension and managed to surprise me on several occasions.
Perhaps it is best to read the Joe O'lochlin books in order, but it is still a great stand alone novel. As usual Sean Barrett is superb. Very highly recommended.

6 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • Stalkers

  • By: Paul Finch
  • Narrated by: Paul Thornley
  • Length: 13 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 618
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 570
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 564

Time's up. You're Next. "All he had to do was name the woman he wanted. It was that easy. They would do all the hard work. "Detective Sergeant Mark 'Heck' Heckenburg is investigating the disappearance of 38 different women. Each one was happy and successful until they vanished without a trace. Desperate to find her missing sister, Lauren Wraxford seeks out Heck's help.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Cliffhanger to the end...

  • By wixey on 24-08-13

Disappointing.

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 28-07-14

At best this fast paced thriller is mediocre. The premise of the story is good, but the plot is totally unbelievable. The baddies are supposed to be experts in tracking people,but we are offered little explanation of how they achieve this,
Some of the dialogue is very poorly written and made me cringe. The one redeeming factor was that the narrator Paul Thornley, kept the book moving at a good pace.
If you are like me, a fan of crime thrillers, you will be aware that there are many fine examples of the genre available on Audible, unfortunately this book is not one of them.

3 of 8 people found this review helpful

  • The Silkworm

  • Cormoran Strike, Book 2
  • By: Robert Galbraith
  • Narrated by: Robert Glenister
  • Length: 17 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,787
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,299
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,282

When novelist Owen Quine goes missing, his wife calls in private detective Cormoran Strike. At first, she just thinks he has gone off by himself for a few days - as he has done before - and she wants Strike to find him and bring him home. But as Strike investigates, it becomes clear that there is more to Quine's disappearance than his wife realises. The novelist has just completed a manuscript featuring poisonous pen-portraits of almost everyone he knows. If the novel were published it would ruin lives - so there are a lot of people who might want to silence him.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 star rating based on quality not name

  • By Linda on 06-08-14

Disappointing.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 17-07-14

Sorry to say that I did not enjoy this book. The plot seemed contrived and some of the dialogue appeared to come from a Janet and John Book, a lot of "he said", "she said", (yes I am that old.
The one redeeming factor was the superb narration of Robert Glenister.
I did finish the book, but as for how the main character managed to solve the crime,is to me a mystery in itself).

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Apple Tree Yard

  • By: Louise Doughty
  • Narrated by: Juliet Stevenson
  • Length: 14 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,123
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,952
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,946

Yvonne Carmichael has a high-flying career, a beautiful home and a good marriage. But when she meets a stranger she is drawn into a passionate affair. Keeping the two halves of her life separate seems easy at first. But she can’t control what happens next.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliant Recommendation!

  • By Mrs. Helen M. Herbert on 09-02-14

A Gem, But Not Flawless.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 24-01-14

A middle aged female academic, an affair, two brutal crimes, a trial and a conclusion. Sound familiar, a typical thriller ?. Well no, this dark intimate look into the human psyche is so much more than that, disturbing revealing and totally absorbing. Author Louise Doughty is a truly gifted writer, her use of language is well judged, her characters are beautifully drawn, their flaws and idiosyncrasies are subtly weaved into the story.It is not a comfortable listen, as the story unfolds the author reveals small insights into future events, this works really well, however you are left to ponder, as to how the story will unfold.
The real strength of the book is Louise Doughty's superb dissection of how we perceive ourselves and how we are able to make the facts fit our version of events, and sometimes we are only fooling ourselves.
The scenes set in the courtroom at The Old Bailey are probably the finest description of a legal case that I have ever read, a great insight into the workings of the British legal system.
Narrator Juliet Stephenson is quite brilliant, I could listen to her reading the Great Western Railway timetable, every character is distinct and her tone and intonation are just perfect.
In my opinion the book has one very minor flaw, the book is written in the first person, through the eyes of the previously mentioned female academic. The story is told in a series of letters written to her lover, though never sent, The letters are in the form of monologs both telling the story and revealing the main characters feelings as she attempts to justify her actions. I felt that in some of the monologs the author dragged thins out a little too far, this made the story feel a little ponderous, thus my only real minor criticism is that the book lacked pace. The book did not quite make 5 stars for this reason, but it was a very near thing, a very good, thought provoking book, I can only recommend that you read it.


35 of 38 people found this review helpful

  • Stratton's War

  • By: Laura Wilson
  • Narrated by: Sean Barrett, Anna Bentinck
  • Length: 16 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 196
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 123
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 117

London, June 1940. When the body of silent screen star Mabel Morgan is found impaled on railings, the coroner rules her death as suicide, but DI Ted Stratton of CID is not convinced. As he starts asking questions, it becomes clear that Morgan's fatal fall may have been the work of one of Soho's most notorious gangsters. When Stratton's path crosses with MI5 agent Diana Calthrop, they uncover a criminal network and a secretive pro-Fascist organisation.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A surprising gem of a story

  • By J NEILL on 18-10-08

Good Book, Just lacked That Something Special.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 18-01-14

This crime novel is set in London at the beginning of the second World War. The story is told from the point of view of two people, an experienced police inspector and a young woman just recruited into M I 5. The plot is complex and the story is tightly plotted, author Laura Wilson does a fine job of recreating the feel of the capital, as it comes to terms with the imminent German bombing campaign. You get a real sense of how the gritty residents of London coped during the blitz. However the book does have a few small issues, many fine young women were recruited into the security services at this time and history shows us what a crucial role they played. From code breaking to risking their lives in France as part of the Special Operations Executive. My issue is that the main female character is so naive and gullible, would such a weak character have been recruited ?. I believe the author does a disservice to the brave young women who served with such distinction. That said, this story of murder, politics and national security is a fine book and may well work better when read as a paperback or as an ebook.
As an audiobook it has a problem, the use of two narrators. Both Sean Barrett and Anna Bentinck are first class narrators, but in this case two narrators makes the story feel somewhat disjointed. I felt the book worked much better when the two stories merged and the voice of Sean Barrett was used more frequently.
Having voiced my small issues with this novel, I did enjoy it and I have already purchased the second book in the series.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • London Calling

  • Inspector Carlyle, Novel 1
  • By: James Craig
  • Narrated by: Joe Jameson
  • Length: 10 hrs and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 85
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 73
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 70

Can you win an election and cover up murder at the same time? When Inspector John Carlyle finds a body in a luxury London hotel room he begins a journey through the murky world of the British ruling classes which leads all the way to the top. In the middle of a General Election, a murderer is stalking the man poised to be the next Prime Minister. With power almost in his grasp, Edgar Carlton will not stand idly by while his birthright is threatened.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • I couldn't finish it.

  • By Alison on 25-06-13

Please don't bother, awful.

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 17-01-14

Did not get past the first hour of this terrible book. I am a big crime thriller fan, this book brings the genre into disrepute. The quality of writing is pretty dire, some of the characterisation is just stereotypical and totally unbelievable. The violence and graphic sex scenes are so poorly written that I began to think the book was a very poor dark comedy.
The narrator would be fine narrating a children's book, but not a gritty thriller. There are so many fine crime thrillers available on Audible, I beg you not to consider this terrible offering.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Police

  • By: Jo Nesbo
  • Narrated by: Sean Barrett
  • Length: 17 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,324
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,192
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,191

The police urgently need Harry Hole. A killer is stalking Oslo’s streets. Police officers are being slain at the scenes of crimes they once investigated, but failed to solve. The murders are brutal, the media reaction hysterical. But this time, Harry can’t help anyone. For years, detective Harry Hole has been at the centre of every major criminal investigation in Oslo. His dedication to his job and his brilliant insights have saved the lives of countless people. But now, with those he loves most facing terrible danger, Harry can’t protect anyone. Least of all himself.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Not an easy book to review

  • By Scullywag on 20-09-13

Tense, dark, brilliant.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-11-13

Author Jo Nesbo's latest incarnation in the Harry Hole series, is I believe his best novel
since "The Snowman". To talk about the plot may give away too much information and spoil the book, so I will just stick to giving my impressions of the book as a whole.
I believe to fully appreciate the story you have to have read the previous novel in the series The "Phantom", so much of the plot only really makes sense if you already know what happened in the previous book.

Nesbo weaves many familiar characters from earlier novels into the plot and as usual he orchestrates his cast with aplomb. As with all the authors books the plot is complex and gripped me right from the opening chapter. The gruesome murders of Oslo police officers provides the backdrop for what is the dark and claustrophobic hunt for a clever and sadistic serial killer.
There are so many sub plots and red herrings, you never really feel comfortable, even in the the most innocuous of situations or in the presence of what appear to be the most benign of characters. This is not a criticism, it is the authors style and one of Nesbo's great strengths, as he is always able to keep you guessing. Narrator Sean Barrett is as usual absolutely superb. Jo Nesbo is at his best in this book, I thoroughly enjoyed reading the book and highly recommend it to you all.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Broken Harbour

  • By: Tana French
  • Narrated by: Hugh Lee
  • Length: 22 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 659
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 458
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 455

In Broken Harbour, a ghost estate outside Dublin - half-built, half-inhabited, half-abandoned - two children and their father are dead. The mother is on her way to intensive care. Scorcher Kennedy is given the case because he is the Murder squad's star detective. At first he and his rookie partner, Richie, think this is a simple one: Pat Spain was a casualty of the recession, so he killed his children, tried to kill his wife Jenny, and finished off with himself.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Not A Run of the Mill Murder Mystery

  • By Linda on 27-08-12

Loved and hated this book.

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 23-10-13

Tana French is obviously a gifted writer, some of her prose is quite brilliant. However, in my opinion this book has a number of problems. As in the previous novels by the author , the book is written in the first person, in this instance a murder detective looking for the big case that will get his career back on track. The story is set in Ireland, post the economic crash of 2008. The book deals with the fall out of the slump and the effect it has on a number of the characters in the book.
The detective gets his case when a young family are found brutally murdered. The author brings the ghosts of the detectives past into the present when his case brings back a host of memories from his childhood. The book attempts to deal with the effects of trauma on the psychology of victims of both violence and the sudden downturn in the Irish economy.
The problem is that almost every major character in the story appears to have issues with their mental health, "a dream for any shrink" ! however I thought this issue was overdone by the author.
The plot is the books real downfall, pretty unbelievable, the plot gets so thick that it ultimately solidifies and brings the story crashing down. As the book ddraws to a close I felt a real sense of anti climax and the ending was pretty unsatisfactory. At times I found this book mesmorizing, and at times it felt as if I were pulling teeth. The saving grace was the excellent narration of Hugh Lee. I did manage to finish the book but I just felt it could have been so much better.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Black Dahlia

  • By: James Ellroy
  • Narrated by: Tom Stechschulte
  • Length: 13 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 144
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 106
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 104

Los Angeles, 11th January 1947. A beautiful young woman walked into the night and met her horrific destiny. Five days later, her tortured body was found drained of blood. The newspapers called her "The Black Dahlia". Two cops are caught up in the investigation and embark on a hellish journey that takes them to the core of the dead girl's twisted life.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A dark and grippping tale

  • By Tom on 29-07-07

Atmospheric thriller

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-09-13

James Ellroy brings his readers back in time, to the L A of the 1940s, atmospherically written in the "noir" style" of Raymond Chandler at his best. The language is a little fruity, however there is no doubt that it comes from that era when Hollywood was in it's "golden age". Great plot, with plenty of twists and turns, complex, well defined characters, Ellroy is able to delve into the darkest recesses of the human psyche. The ability of the author to bring true human emotion onto the page, left me caring about the fate of some of the more dubious players in the piece.
I felt drawn into the LA of the time, with the people and places feeling very familiar, this maybe because I am a huge fan of the movie LA Confidential, which I believe is based on a James Ellroy novel. If you've seen and enjoyed the movie, then definately read this book, if you've not seen the movie, I would still recommend listening to the wonderful narration of Tom Stechschulte, his relaxed style makes listening very easy. Overall a very good thriller.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful