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  • 6
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  • 13
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  • 8
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  • Radical Honesty: How to Transform Your Life by Telling the Truth

  • By: Brad Blanton
  • Narrated by: Brad Blanton
  • Length: 8 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 58
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 54
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 52

In Radical Honesty, Dr. Blanton coaches us on how to have lives that work, how to have relationships that are alive and passionate, and how to create intimacy where none exists. As we have been taught by the philosophical and spiritual sources of our culture for thousands of years, from Plato to Nietzsche, from the Bible to Emerson, the truth shall set you free.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Monotone

  • By james anning on 11-10-17

Great insights, poorly narrated, too long, don’t miss it

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 22-10-17

Although there is some immensely valuable content in this book that I am so glad to have received, Brad Blanton’s voice is like monotonous gravel and as appealing as a dead man talking. The quality of the recording is very poor with frequent breaks and changes in level like an amateur’s first attempt at laying a brick wall. It’s hard to fathom why the author allowed himself to be the reader because he fullness of facility for the former is as great as his lack of competence for the latter. The book is also far too long and I was pleased when I got the end. I couldn’t help but speculate that Brad must have received some helpful advice on editing that he firmly ignored. I need to reflect further on his approach, but I am not persuaded at least of the radical approach he advocates to honesty. For one, when others misinterpret what you honestly tell them, they then respond to that misinterpretation, which is not fruitful and makes it appropriate at times to be less open; if recipients react not to what you have shared but their distorted mis-perception. None the less, there were some understandings I gained of matters that I had been struggling to make sense of for some years and some challenges to how I live my life. And at times he conjured some magical phrases and reflections, although with his pen rather than his voice. The book points us our inner being in a powerful way, but in my opinion failing to deeply see our connection to one another, lacked the warmth of a deep goodwill towards the other, seeming at times in its concern to cut through ‘bullshit’ to bathe in offering gratuitous offence.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

The Idiot
    
    
        By:
        












    





    





    
        
            
            
                
            
        
        Fyodor Dostoevsky
    
    


    
    
        Narrated by:
        












    





    





    
        
            
            
                
            
        
        Robert Whitfield
    
    


    
    Length: 22 hrs and 27 mins
    67 ratings
    Overall 4.1
  • The Idiot

  • By: Fyodor Dostoevsky
  • Narrated by: Robert Whitfield
  • Length: 22 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 67
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 46
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 45

In The Idiot, a saintly man, Prince Myshkin, is thrust into the heart of a society more concerned with wealth, power, and sexual conquest than the ideals of Christianity. Myshkin soon finds himself at the center of a violent love triangle in which a notorious woman and a beautiful young girl become rivals for his affections. Extortion, scandal, and murder follow, testing the wreckage left by human misery to find "man in man."

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • A great story but a mixed experience

  • By P on 11-11-14

A great story but a mixed experience

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-11-14

What made the experience of listening to The Idiot the most enjoyable?

It is a shame Audible often do not indicate which translation they use of foreign books or which publisher if no translator is names. I like to have the text as well as the book and it took me some time to establish this version is from Wordsworth Classics.
I know no Russian but the translation seemed to be literal at times at the expense of flowing. It also would be better to have a translation with more contemporary use of language that felt more natural. For example, opening the book at random I read: "Learned daughters,in the first place.." It is hard to imagine anyone saying this today. A more natural version might be: "First of all you clever girls.."
It is also unfortunate that part of a very insightful psychological vignette regarding a hedgehog at pages 477-478 in my copy has been accidentally overlooked and missed out in the reading.
As to the audio this was in many respects very good but suffered from the principal limitation of audio books - that of opposite sex rendition. Robert Whitfield was not that good with the female voices. I don't know why Audio book publishers don't try using two readers of opposite gender - one to be the gender of the story teller and all speech in that gender and an opposite gender person to do all the speech belonging to the opposite gender. So a male story teller would do all the male parts and a woman just the female speech or alternatively a female story teller would do all the female parts and a man just the male speech.
Not with standing this - a great story.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Secret Scripture

  • By: Sebastian Barry
  • Narrated by: Stephen Hogan
  • Length: 9 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 498
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 297
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 297

Nearing her 100th birthday, Roseanne McNulty faces an uncertain future, as the Roscommon Regional Mental Hospital where's she spent most of her adult life prepares for closure. Over the weeks leading up to this upheaval, she talks with her psychiatrist, Dr. Greene, and their relationship intensifies and complicates. Told through their respective journals, the story that emerges is at once shocking and deeply beautiful.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Intriguing story with exceptional narration

  • By Trixie on 26-07-15

Beautifully written

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 30-07-13

Set in Southern Ireland, Roseanne has lived in the psychiatric hospital for decades and is very, very old. The institution is closing and a much smaller unit it being built. Is she ill? How did she come to live there? Can she move to the new unit or will she be put into the community? This is explored in parallel by Roseanne and the hospital psychiatrist, Dr Grene. How much can he find out and can Roseanne's memory be trusted. What will she share and for what reason? Why is the psychiatrist so interested in her? How do we know the past and how does it define us?
This is a beautifully written book crafted in a way that is much less simple than first appears. Full of poignancy and rich, juicy sentences it slowly, beguilingly unravels its' secrets. Float on the words as they ease by.
No wonder it won the Costa Book Award in 2008.

  • In His Own Words

  • Conversations with Meister Eckhart
  • By: Meister Eckhart, Simon Parke
  • Narrated by: Andy Harrison, Simon Parke
  • Length: 3 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 25
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 6

Conversations with Meister Eckhart is an imagined conversation with this 13th-century mystic, around such themes as detachment, which he famously placed above love; spirituality; God; the soul; and suffering. But while the conversation is imagined, Eckhart's words are not; they are authentically his own.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Saying the unsayable

  • By P on 26-08-10

Saying the unsayable

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 26-08-10

This short audio book, which I am now listening to for the fouth time, imagines an inteview with Eckhart using Eckhart's own words. This allows some explanation of his meaning and although it sometimes feels a rather self conscious format it is effective in its purpose. Eckhart's words are delivered well and it would be hard to read them as effectively to oneself as they are offered here. Eckhart is not deliberately obscure but simply seeking to say what cannot be said in words, to express truths that cannot be expressed. These are words to ponder, words to contemplate, words to help anyone who is seeking.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

Memoirs of a Geisha
    
    
        By:
        












    





    





    
        
            
            
                
            
        
        Arthur Golden
    
    


    
    
        Narrated by:
        












    





    





    
        
            
            
                
            
        
        Bernadette Dunne
    
    


    
    Length: 17 hrs and 54 mins
    628 ratings
    Overall 4.6
  • Memoirs of a Geisha

  • By: Arthur Golden
  • Narrated by: Bernadette Dunne
  • Length: 17 hrs and 54 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 628
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 413
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 412

In a voice both haunting and startlingly immediate, Nitta Sayuri describes her life as a geisha. Taken from her home at the age of nine, she is sold into slavery to a renowned geisha house. Witness her transformation as you enter a world where appearances are paramount, virginity is auctioned to the highest bidder, women beguile powerful men, and love is scorned as illusion.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Didn't want it to end..................

  • By Coleen on 09-01-06

A book to savour

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-08-10

This is a lovely book charting the journey of a impoverished Japenese village girl into becoming a geisha showing us the beauty, privilige and oppression central to this unusual life. A book about longing, love and destiny read at just the right pace in tune with the text, the language is replete with simple zen type images that are full of originality, for example, 'she had a cough a part of her as a song is part of a bird': 'I wasn't really thinking so much as struggling to put my thoughts into some kind of order. They felt to me like rice pouring from a torn sack'. A great story, a window on a disappearing world, a magical journey of pain and hope.

  • Wives and Daughters

  • By: Elizabeth Gaskell
  • Narrated by: Prunella Scales
  • Length: 25 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 333
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 264
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 261

Molly Gibson, the only daughter of a widowed doctor in the small provincial town of Hollingford, lost her mother when she was a child. Her father remarries wanting to give Molly the woman's presence he feels she lacks. To Molly, any stepmother would have been a shock, but the new Mrs. Gibson is a self-absorbed, petty widow, and Molly's unhappiness is compounded by the realisation that her father has come to regret his second marriage.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Superb characterisation by a first class reader

  • By Philadelphus on 01-06-07

A pleasure

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-04-09

A very enjoyable audio book. Skillfully read by Prunella Scales only to be faulted in that occasionally she delivers some of the dialogue rather quickly. Her reading is responsive to the affect of the text and distinguishes well the differing characters. It is a long book which also makes it a treat to listen to. Recommeded.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful