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Ok

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 17-01-20

I enjoyed Eat, Drink, Run and downloaded Mad Girl because of the favourable reviews. It's ok. Bryony is an entertaining author but this Mad Girl just trundle along with nothing untoward, shocking, surprising or out of the ordinary.

it's a time filler and ok if you like Bridget Jones' Diary.

Narration was too monotonous

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 27-12-19

Having tried to listen to the first chapter 3 times, I've given up and returned the title.
The narrator has a lovely voice but his over dramatic whispering is difficult to listen to. The book is read by tte author and his passion for the story is evident but over-emphysis means that at times it becomes a bit William Shatner's 'Captain Kirk', where Every. Word. Is. It's. Own. Sentence.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

Tedious.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 24-12-19

I.liked the film and was keen to hear how the book compares. It doesn't. I've tried with this book but it is so difficult to care about. The narcissistic attention to detail that is amusing in the film becomes endless lists of waffle, suffocating the storyline into obscurity. The loathsome sinister aspect of Bateman's personality in the film comes across in the book as nothing more than yet another obnoxious financier. As this is the POV for the whole book, it is like being cornered at the office party by the company wideboy salesman.

I've made it to chapter 20. It's been an effort but I'm admitting defeat with American Psycho. 2 dimensional and boring.

Ok satire on Brexit

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 27-09-19

During an interview, Ian McEwan stated that he wrote this book to let off steam at Brexit and that is possibly the best way to sum up The Cockroach. The book is excellently written and narrated The story doesn't pretend to be breaking boundaries but is enjoyable none the less and makes more sense than what is going on in the UK.

6 of 6 people found this review helpful

Just not that interesting

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 21-07-19

I like David Mitchell as a performer, I like his quirky outlook and wit but I can't get into this book at all. It lends to the feeling of being stuck in the window seat of an airplane beside a friendly but tedious pensioner, entertaining themself by forcing their life story onto you.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

Some good points but sensationalized

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 21-07-19

This book does highlights the concerning issues with chiropractic as the majority of chiropractic is a money making scam but it ruined itself with factual inaccuracies and skewed perspective.

As an osteopath and myofascial therapist , I am not a fan of chiropractic and cannot see any way that adjusting the spine can cure much except a solitary facet restriction but this book is at times unfair.

Morrison twists the truth like a gutter press tabloid to suit his agenda rather than letting the facts speak for themselves.

In one instance, the report of potential appendix pain was addressed entirely correctly by the chiropractor, including telling the uninsured patient to consult his MD (a costly process in the US) if the situation did not resolve in a a couple of days. I am pretty sure that Morrison may have omitted the rest of the standard phrase 'or if the pain gets worse' to glitter his rant.
Nor does Morrison does give credit to the fact the reporter did not have any of the symptoms he was claiming so would show hegative in testing for appendicitis.

I wanted to love this book but Morrison has shown himself to have no credibility.



1 of 1 people found this review helpful

Ok bit repetitive.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 15-06-19

The first Jack Nightingale was pretty good,, not on par with Dan Shepherd, in my opinion but good enough to see what happens next.
The story was predictable, a little ludicrous at times but it's an ok story.
The characters aren't that strong. Jack, the hard smoking, cool headed ex-cop with issues and chinks of vulnerability. Jenny, the uber-efficient sidekick and moral compass. The hint of sexual tension... Midnight doesn't really bring much that hasn't been done before but it's listenable and I quite enjoyed it even though I didn't care that much about the characters.
I couldn't really see why he's so bothered about finding and saving a half sister he's never known about when the odds were so high. Other characters became irritating so I won't be moving on to book 3.

Fast paced and gripping

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-02-19

I had this book on pre-order and was not disappointed. The character of John Carr has lost any vestigial vulnerability but it fits as he's not fighting a personal battle this time. I'm looking forward to James Deegan's book #3.

Glad I persevered

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 28-01-19

It took countless attempts to get into this book but I'm so glad I finally read it. There's two story lines running in alternate sections, a love story and a war story. The love story is the reason It's taken so long to read this book because I couldn't engage or care less about any of the characters. I'd have preferred those parts to have been reduced to a couple of chapters each rather than sections.

But then the war story.

I would have given this story two stars for the love story but Faulks depiction of the madness, bravery, abandonment, futility, honour, grief and fear experienced by the soldiers in the French trenches deserves full marks.

It's impossible to imagine what it was like to have been in the trenches but this book left me stunned with compassion, not necessarilyfor the characters but for all those who experienced the Hell.

Lest we forget.

Interesting but factually flawed

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-12-18

Once an accusation of witchcraft has been made, the trial is nothing more than a public entertainment spectacle terminatingin the death of the accused.
An 80 year old blind women in the 1600s would have enough sense to agree to anything straight off the bat rather than face strip searches, implement, needling, branding and any other torture the sadistic 'witchfinder' could dream up.

This topic is dramatic enough without the context being skewed to spice the book up.