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Louisa

United Kingdom
  • 6
  • reviews
  • 9
  • helpful votes
  • 36
  • ratings
  • Walking

  • By: Henry David Thoreau
  • Narrated by: Deaver Brown
  • Length: 1 hr and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 8
  • Performance
    2.5 out of 5 stars 6
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6

> Walking is not as well known as Thoreau's other works Walden, The Maine Woods, and Civil Disobedience. But it is a good place to start exploring his writing because it was his last book, in 1862, published by the Atlantic Monthly shortly after his death. It is less well known because it is general, as opposed to singular, in focus. It is his summing up of his thoughts on life: One should saunter through life and take notice; one need not go far.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Beautiful reflection on Walking and life

  • By Tools26 on 24-07-17

The narrator can't read. He's struggling

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 13-06-18

Really interested in the writing but the performance is unbearable. was it recorded in a cassette tape?

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • A Fraction of the Whole

  • By: Steve Toltz
  • Narrated by: Colin McPhillamy, Craig Baldwin
  • Length: 25 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 87
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 39
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 40

Martin Dean spent his entire life analyzing absolutely everything - from the benefits of suicide to the virtues of strip clubs - and passing on his self-taught knowledge to his son, Jasper. But now that his father's dead, Jasper can fully reflect on the man who raised him in intellectual captivity, and the irony is this: theirs was a great adventure. From his prison cell, Jasper Dean tells the unlikely story of his scheming father Martin, his crazy Uncle Terry and how the three of them upset - mostly unintentionally - an entire continent.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Fathers and Sons

  • By sarahmoose2000 on 02-08-09

The great Australian novel, a treasure-trove

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 18-04-18

I’ve read/heard this three times now. It’s gonna become my bible at this rate.

Profound, funny as f, poignant, wry.

  • Surfaces and Essences

  • Analogy as the Fuel and Fire of Thinking
  • By: Douglas Hofstadter, Emmanuel Sander
  • Narrated by: Sean Pratt
  • Length: 33 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 12
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 10
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 9

Analogy is the core of all thinking. This is the simple but unorthodox premise that Pulitzer Prize-winning author Douglas Hofstadter and French psychologist Emmanuel Sander defend in their new work. Hofstadter has been grappling with the mysteries of human thought for over 30 years. Now, with his trademark wit and special talent for making complex ideas vivid, he has partnered with Sander to put forth a highly novel perspective on cognition.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Trivial and laboured

  • By Louisa on 13-09-17

Trivial and laboured

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 13-09-17

I love Hofstadter, but this book shouldn't have been written. First chapter is good example of my problem with this book. It labours painfully and embarrassingly over an idea that I (and I imagine most people) have had, and understood completely and utterly, in the past, namely that some words have different levels of granularity and that some languages have more granularity than others. Yes, we could use different verbs for when a man *eats* to when a woman *eats* or even different words depending on what is being eaten. But we just use "eat". So what?! But there's not even a discrete set of categories and it's in fact fluid? So what! Not interesting.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • One Hundred Years of Solitude

  • By: Gabriel García Márquez, Gregory Rabassa - translator
  • Narrated by: John Lee
  • Length: 14 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 432
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 388
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 388

One of the 20th century's enduring works, One Hundred Years of Solitude is a widely beloved and acclaimed novel known throughout the world and the ultimate achievement in a Nobel Prize-winning career. The novel tells the story of the rise and fall of the mythical town of Macondo through the history of the Buendía family. Rich and brilliant, it is a chronicle of life, death, and the tragicomedy of humankind. In the beautiful, ridiculous, and tawdry story of the Buendía family, one sees all of humanity, just as in the history, myths, growth, and decay of Macondo, one sees all of Latin America.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Awful reader, especially of women.

  • By alex on 25-02-14

In all formats, this book is dreary bleating

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 18-03-17

I tried the physical form of this book years ago and couldn't stay awake for more than two pages. The audio version the same. Nothing profound, no wisdom, no psychology, no depth, just a stream of unremitting, monotone, trivial observations about things, stuff, events. I can only imagine that the fame of the book and its author come from a delicate balance of timing, a good title, and an exotic-sounding author. It's the crappest book I've read since I tried the equally facile and long-winded LOTR.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Ardennes 1944

  • Hitler's Last Gamble
  • By: Antony Beevor
  • Narrated by: Sean Barrett
  • Length: 14 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 406
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 364
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 356

Penguin presents the unabridged, downloadable audiobook edition of Ardennes 1944 by Antony Beever, read by Sean Barrett. On 16 December 1944, Hitler launched his last gamble in the snow-covered forests and gorges of the Ardennes on the Belgian/German border. Although Hitler's generals were doubtful of success, younger officers and NCOs were desperate to believe that their homes and families could be saved from the vengeful Red Army approaching from the east.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Very good indeed.

  • By Mr. on 06-07-15

Great

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 27-05-16

Classic - excellent and compelling Beevor. He really knows how to build momentum and suspense (without any pretentious quotes or other distractions). Like a Bruckner symphony.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Snuff

  • By: Terry Pratchett
  • Narrated by: Stephen Briggs
  • Length: 11 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 2,586
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1,846
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 1,840

It is a truth universally acknowledged that a policeman taking a holiday would barely have had time to open his suitcase before he finds his first corpse. And Commander Sam Vimes of the Ankh-Morpork City Watch is on holiday in the pleasant and innocent countryside, but not for him a mere body in the wardrobe. There are many, many bodies and an ancient crime more terrible than murder. He is out of his jurisdiction, out of his depth, out of bacon sandwiches, and occasionally snookered and out of his mind, but never out of guile. They say that in the end all sins are forgiven.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • More true to life than fantasy should be!

  • By Mr. C. Horsfall on 31-03-12

Classic Pratchett joy

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 25-01-12

Wonderful blend of the dark, the magical and the poignant and witty, this was a great treat to listen to. Lovely narration. Don't doubt- just buy it. You'll love it.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful