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Nicola Watkinson

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  • 6
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  • Black Wave

  • By: Michelle Tea
  • Narrated by: Michelle Tea
  • Length: 10 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 4
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 4

Desperate to quell her addiction to drugs, disastrous romance, and '90s San Francisco, Michelle heads south for LA. But soon it's officially announced that the world will end in one year, and life in the sprawling metropolis becomes increasingly weird. While living in an abandoned bookstore, dating Matt Dillon, and keeping an eye on the encroaching apocalypse, Michelle begins a new novel, a sprawling and metatextual exploration to complement her promises of maturity and responsibility.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Postmodern apocalypse tale

  • By Nicola Watkinson on 18-10-18

Postmodern apocalypse tale

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 18-10-18

When I first read (listened to) BW I wasn't sure about it, but on re-visiting it I'm absolutely converted. I disliked Tea's narration at first, but it grew on me after a while, and eventually seemed to fit well with the form and plot of the story. The novel itself is about lesbians, the apocalypse, love, sex, drugs, death, books, and the West Coast; I love it, but if you're not into lots of drugs and sex you might not. Also if you're not interested in experimental fiction -- the form unspools as the novel goes on, author Michelle separating from fictional Michelle in interesting and compelling ways, but maybe not for everyone. But for me it's a gorgeous and powerful novel about love and identity at the end of the world, and I would recommend this reading of it if you have the time to get lost in it and let Tea's voice wash over you.

  • Toward a Cognitive Theory of Narrative Acts

  • Cognitive Approaches to Literature and Culture Series
  • By: Frederick Luis Aldama (editor)
  • Narrated by: Kellie Fitzgerald
  • Length: 11 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    2.5 out of 5 stars 5
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars 4
  • Story
    2.5 out of 5 stars 4

Toward a Cognitive Theory of Narrative Acts brings together in one volume cutting-edge research that turns to recent findings in cognitive and neurobiological sciences, psychology, linguistics, philosophy, and evolutionary biology, among other disciplines, to explore and understand more deeply various cultural phenomena, including art, music, literature, and film. The essays fulfilling this task for the general listener as well as the specialist are written by renowned authors.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • awesomeness and seamlessly well read.

  • By Indana on 28-07-16

interesting concept but grating narration

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 27-05-17

i was fascinated by the concept of this book, and wanted badly to enjoy it. i persevered for as long as i could, but the robotic narrator is impossible for me to listen to - it sounds like it's being narrated by a computer programme. i also found the material in one of the essays objectionable, as the author took a very reductive and antiquated approach to autism spectrum disorders, which really put me off.