LISTENER

Rose

  • 155
  • reviews
  • 135
  • helpful votes
  • 156
  • ratings
  • Haunted House

  • By: Jack Kilborn
  • Narrated by: Rob Shapiro
  • Length: 8 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 58
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 54
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 54

At Butler House a series of grisly murders over a century have led many to believe it's haunted. To one scientist it's the perfect place for an experiment in fear. Eight people, each chosen because they lived through a terrifying experience, are offered a million dollars to spend one night at Butler House. They can take whatever they want with them - religious items, survival gear, and weapons. All they need to do is last the night.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Terrifying!!!

  • By Sue Jackson on 20-09-15

one word, pathetic

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-10-18

First of all let me get this out of the way and then I’ll review this book. Words tumble from mouth ergo they are spoken and therefore said so why oh why oh why do authors have to always state the obvious by stating that ‘he said’ and ‘she said’? this we already know. What we need to know is the manner in which dialogue is spoken. was it shouted? Screamed? Repeated and so on. that we hardly ever find out and this book is pretty much no exception to the laziness which afflicts authors the whole world over and more often than not it masquerades as ‘good writing’. Okay then rant over. Now for the review. I liked this book in the beginning. Plenty of fear and suspense but then close to the end it became lame and predictable so where once it might have been worth three stars it has only one because it is pathetic and lame. The naration is pretty good though except for the really bad English accent but i can live with that. Will I keep this book? Well i read it so what’s the point in returning it now I ask sorry I mean, I said.

  • The Child Next Door: An unputdownable psychological thriller with a brilliant twist

  • By: Shalini Boland
  • Narrated by: Katie Villa
  • Length: 8 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 227
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 211
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 213

Kirstie Rawlings is jolted awake by a child crying. Racing upstairs to check on her newborn, she is plunged into every parents’ worst nightmare. She hears an unknown voice in the baby monitor saying, "Let’s take the child - and go." Is someone trying to steal her little girl?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Loved it

  • By Tabs S on 20-05-18

what an awful bunch of characters

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 24-09-18

I really wanted to give this book a better star rating and so you might say well, why not then and there are one or two reasons for it. First of all let’s say that Kirsty is probably the most awful woman I have read about this year. she’s selfish, annoying and she just loves a pity party and all that moralizing at the end well, it’s not for me. Also i found it slightly predictable and though I can believe in the story ine and that there’s still more hiding beneath the surface I did nevertheless find some of it not to my taste. that said I did finish the book in one sitting so it’s not all bad hence the middle rating and the performance was pretty well flawless. Mind you, I’m not surprised at the eppilogue and I could guess at the reason for so much air freshener but that’ll do for now, don’t want to spoil it for anyone else wanting to read it do I?

  • High Sobriety

  • My Year Without Booze
  • By: Jill Stark
  • Narrated by: Vannessa Coffey
  • Length: 9 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 40
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 35
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 36

I'm the binge-drinking health reporter. During the week, I write about Australia's booze-soaked culture. At the weekends, I write myself off. Born and raised in Scotland, the home of whisky, Jill Stark had booze in the blood. Alcohol had dominated her social life ever since she had her first sip of lager, at 13. She thought nothing could curb her love of big nights. Then came the hangover that changed everything. In the shadow of her 35th year, Jill made a decision: she would give up alcohol.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Eye opening

  • By Kim on 26-05-16

Not really me at all

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-09-18

Wel, the book is interesting. it does a lot of things around research which are scary and very informative as well as interesting. it quotes a lot of statistics about alcohol and what it can do to people, how much we absulutely depend on it and not just by its hold over us from a drinking point of view but how it fundamentally is the root of who and what we are or have become. However, that said I found its style boring. Too journalistic, too documentary and come April too boastful. I guess some people will like it, it depends on if that style suits you or not. it doesn’t suit me. I’ll keep the book, there are some good facts in it but definitely I will not finish it. Too corny as well though it is also fun in places.

  • The Accident

  • By: C.L. Taylor
  • Narrated by: Jenny Funnell
  • Length: 9 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 329
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 296
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 295

Fast paced and suspenseful, The Accident is perfect for fans of Before I Go to Sleep, Gone Girl, and Sophie Hannah. A gripping psychological thriller about the deadly secrets your children can keep.... Sue Jackson has the perfect family, but when her teenage daughter, Charlotte, deliberately steps in front of a bus and ends up in a coma she is forced to face a very dark reality. Retracing her daughter's steps, she finds a horrifying entry in Charlotte's diary and is forced to head deep into Charlotte's private world.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • tense!!!

  • By MR on 03-05-15

a different kind of grooming

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 22-08-18

I wanted to give this book more than a three star rating I really did and i would have done if I’d reviewed it prematurely but luckily i didn’t because there were faults with it though they didn’t creep in until nearly the end. The book itself well, it’s pacey and with a good plot. the central characters are believable if in one case weak and yet determined and who can say how we’d behave in a similar situation to that in which Sue finds herself? However the writing is poor really overall and the footballer bit is ust corny as is the ending. If you’re not too fussy though then you might enjoy this book. I certainly did until almost the end then I didn’t.

  • Poets of the Great War

  • By: Wilfred Owen, Siegfried Sassoon, Isaac Rosenberg
  • Narrated by: Michael Maloney, Jasper Britton
  • Length: 2 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 25
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10

Here are the extraordinary writings of a generation who fought through a war of unprecedented destructive power, and who had to find new voices to express the horror of what they discovered. The great names - Owen, Sassoon - are fully represented, but there are also many poems by lesser-known or unexpected figures, ranging from serving soldiers like Isaac Rosenberg and Richard Aldington to women such as Edith Nesbit and Vera Brittain.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • What passing bells for these who die as cattle?

  • By Rose on 29-07-18

What passing bells for these who die as cattle?

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 29-07-18

So, this is what war is all about. These poems are some of the best ever written about conflict I think and yet, i wonder if they’d have been so well known if war ahd not intervened or their poetry so poignant and full of emotion. I wonder too if the other side had its poets as well. However, this is a review and not a thesis so I’ll speak no more of what I think concerning poets and war and concentrate instead on the point of the book which is to bring together some of the finest work of those that in some cases never lived to see its publication. It has everything. it is emotional, angry and cynical as well plus a lot of other things besides. In some parts of the performance the telling tends to beer towards the melodramatic when more emotion might habe enhanced the reading so that it becomes a bit formulaic but otherwise it would go a very long way in making the point regarding the futility of war though war is, on one level, a necessary evil of mankind but that’s a topic for another day.

  • Bought and Sold

  • By: Megan Stephens
  • Narrated by: Josie Dunn
  • Length: 6 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 108
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 95
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 96

A heart-stopping story of lies, brutality, and fear. British girl Megan Stephens tells the true story of how an idyllic Mediterranean holiday turned into an unimaginable nightmare when she was tricked into becoming a victim of human trafficking and held captive for six years through deception, threats, and violence.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliant

  • By Rosa-Lynn Bruce on 23-08-15

Stupid, stupid, stupid girl

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 27-07-18

Not a bad book. Not well written unfortunately but a good story about a very stupid girl and it’s not me saying it, it’s Megan herself and she’s right but then who am i to judge? The one thing about this book is just how scary it is. It seems to me that all of us are just a step away from making the same mistake as she did. The story is harrowing and to some shocking. Not to me though. I’ve seen and read enough not to be shocked by anything this dustbin of a world might throw up to stab us in the back. This book is not one for bleeding hearted sentimentalists but an honest account of the advantages men take of women and girls sometimes. The naration isn’t great but for the kind of book it is it works pretty well. The usual mistake is made concerning a ‘mental hospiral’ of which there is no such thing when you think about it. there are hospitals for the mentally ill but not mental hospitals. Anyway, if you want to read a story about the real horrors of human trafficking you could do worse than read this. If hou’re a female you might cry. I didn’t. I am female but made of sterner stuff than that.

  • Helga's Diary

  • A Young Girl's Account of Life in a Concentration Camp
  • By: Helga Weiss
  • Narrated by: Emily Bevan
  • Length: 5 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 50
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 46
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 44

In 1938, when her diary begins, Helga is eight years old. Alongside her father and mother and the 45,000 Jews who live in Prague, she endures the Nazi invasion and regime: Her father is denied work, schools are closed to her, she and her parents are confined to their flat. Then deportations begin, and her friends and family start to disappear. In 1941, Helga and her parents are sent to the concentration camp of Terezn, where they live for three years. Here Helga documents their daily life - the harsh conditions, disease, and suffering, as well as moments of friendship, creativity, and hope - until, in 1944, they are sent to Auschwitz.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • sadly compelling listening.

  • By sue on 29-03-13

Who says you can’t live without the internet?

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 22-07-18

There are vain people who scream that they can’t live without social media, mobile phones, make-up and so on. Well there people managed for five years to live without even the word freedom to sustain them so this book is yet more proof that vanity is something we’d all be better off without. On the book itself well, I never feel quite comfortable about judging a personal account of something that really happened but for once here’s an account which is harrowing of course but also upbeat and full of the thoughts and genuine feelings of a mere child forced to grow up before her time. It pulls no punches and at first you think of it as just a good whinge but actually it’s not. It’s a decent first hand account of all the emotions involved in being in prison and making the best of it. The optimism and the despair are here and it’s really well read too capturing all the emotions that Helga really felt and I’m glad there are people around that wanted to publish their accounts though I wonder where she got the paper from and the time to write this diary which I will admit at first seems a bit disjointed but then diaries often do. I enjoyed it though but it might have been nice to learn whether her parents survived or not. I think they may not have done, I hope though that they did.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • How I Lost You

  • By: Jenny Blackhurst
  • Narrated by: Jennifer Ness
  • Length: 10 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 363
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 335
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 338

My name is Emma Cartwright. Three years ago I was Susan Webster, and I murdered my 12-week-old son Dylan. I have no memory of what happened but you believe what your loved ones, your doctor and the police are telling you, don't you? But if you can't remember what happened, how can you be sure that they are telling the truth? And if there was the smallest chance your son was alive, wouldn't you do anything to get him back? A fantastic debut from an outstanding talent. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • brilliant but quite dark

  • By mjays on 23-10-15

What you don’t know about your relations

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 16-07-18

Well what is it you think you know about your relations? that’s essentially what this book asks and if you read nothing else this year you simply have to read this book. Well written and full of genuine observations about the characters. It’s kind of like ‘Lord of the flies’ adult style in a way though you’d have to read pretty deeply in to it to see the resemblance. This book is full of selfishness, weakness, cowardice and strength. Yes, some might see it as predictable but yet not in a bad way. I don’t want to reveal too much about plot because that would spoil it but I can truthfully declare that this has been the best book I’ve read this year so much so taht I couldn’t do any work today, I just wanted to finish it. I can only hope that whoever else reads this enjoys it as much as I did. Mind you, some of what goes on here is beastly and gross and yet, it happens which is truly scary if you want to contemplate the depravity of mankind and the lengths some people will go to in order to protect their past and the dirty secrets they keep there.

  • Woodsman

  • By: Ben Law
  • Narrated by: Ben Law
  • Length: 4 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 50
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 47
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 47

Ben Law has lived as a woodsman in Prickly Nut Wood for over 20 years. His authentic, incredible sense of the land and the wildlife, and his respect for age-old traditions and how to sustain them offers a wonderful, inviting insight into the life and character of Prickly Nut Wood. Having travelled to Papua New Guinea and the Amazon, observing age-old techniques for living in, working in and preserving forests and woodland, Ben Law felt compelled to return home and apply his learning to a 400-year-old plot of woodland near where he grew up.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Might not be what you expect but a great listen

  • By Big Ayd on 13-04-13

How can a book be so fascinating and yet so awful at the same time?

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 15-07-18

First of all the positives if there are any to report on when I’m barely ten minutes in to a book and yet I feel already I can review it with some certainty of purpose. Well it’s short and I’m sure it will be fascinating but, and there is a but, there are two things about naration which are irritating. First of all a flat expresionless voice which sounds utterly boring. The second thing is this, the word is through not as the narator pronounces it, fru or other not uver. In other words there’s a clearly audible speech imprdiment which is very off-putting to any listener. I’ll read this book if only to learn for myself and not because I expect to enjoy it. Thank goodness it’s short.

  • Printer's Devil Court

  • By: Susan Hill
  • Narrated by: Steven Pacey
  • Length: 1 hr and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 84
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 73
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 73

Ideally spooky Halloween listening.... A chilling ghost story by the author of The Woman in Black. One murky November evening, after a satisfying meal in their Fleet Street lodgings, a conversation between four medical students takes a curious turn, and Hugh is initiated into a dark secret. In the cellar of their narrow lodgings in Printer's Devil Court and a little used mortuary in a subterranean annex of the hospital, they have begun to interfere with death itself, in shadowy experiments beyond the realms of medical ethics.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Victoria sponge...

  • By FictionFan on 17-06-15

Interesting but implausible I hope

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 13-07-18

This was short but interesting. the idea though I hope is implausible since it’s pretty scary if it could actually be done. Other than that I enjoyed it a lot. It’s not an original style of writing and I’m not sure it quite matches ‘The woman in black’ but then what does? It’s not bad though and the naration is very good. Just because it is such an unlikely plot I gave it four stars only but really? if you only have an hour to spare or just a bit more then it’s a good read.