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Nigel

Presteigne, Powys, United Kingdom
  • 10
  • reviews
  • 61
  • helpful votes
  • 23
  • ratings
  • A Prisoner of Birth

  • By: Jeffrey Archer
  • Narrated by: Roger Allam
  • Length: 16 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,423
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 863
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 858

Danny Cartwright and Spencer Craig were born on different sides of the track. Danny is an East End Cockney mechanic, Spencer is a West End barrister. When they meet, their lives will never be the same again.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Prisoner of Birth (Unabridged

  • By Jean on 15-04-08

first Archer, but not my last

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 20-03-09

This was my first Archer, as I, like other reviewers, thought it would be pulp fiction. How wrong could I be? the story grips fom the start, and develops apparently endlessly, but I just wanted it to carry on. the story has layer upon layer, never bores and always entertains.

6 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • Black Diamonds

  • The Rise and Fall of an English Dynasty
  • By: Catherine Bailey
  • Narrated by: Gareth Armstrong
  • Length: 15 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 678
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 472
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 471

Wentworth is today a crumbling and forgotten palace in Yorkshire. Yet just 100 years ago it was the ancestral pile of the Fitzwilliams' - an aristocratic clan whose home and life were fuelled by coal mining. This is the story of their spectacular decline: of inheritance fights; rumours of a changeling and of lunacy; philandering earls; illicit love; war heroism: a tragic connection to the Kennedys'; violent deaths: mining poverty and squalor; and a class war that literally ripped apart the local landscape.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliant!

  • By Colin on 19-02-09

GREAT STORY BEAUTIFULLY READ, BUT IS IT FICTION?

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-03-09

I bouht this book because it sounded like an interesting story. It turns out it is true, so I wondred why it is in the fiction section. A book about mining sounds uninspiring, but the book truely is fantastic. It follows the lives of the inhabitants of one of the most stately homes in England (google it to get some idea of it's majesty) along with the intertwined lives of the mining villages. It interweaves stories beautifully but always clearly giving an insight into how lives and history are inevitably tangled. Don't like history...don't be put off. If history was always this interesting we'd all have done it at university! The book is also beautifully read by a voice you could listen to all day.

31 of 38 people found this review helpful

  • Adrian Mole and the Weapons of Mass Destruction

  • By: Sue Townsend
  • Narrated by: Paul Daintry
  • Length: 14 hrs and 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 164
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 112
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 114

Adrian Mole is 34 and three quarters, almost officially middle-aged, when Mr. Blair tells Parliament that Weapons of Mass Destruction can be deployed in 45 minutes and can reach Cyprus. Adrian is worried that he might not get a refund on his holiday. But that's not all that is bothering him. There's his odd girlfriend Marigold who has become distressingly New Age. And his son Glenn who is in Deepcut Barracks. Would Mr. Blair have been quite so keen if it had been his son manning a roadblock?

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Moley

  • By Martin on 19-04-08

good light entertainment

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 22-02-09

I downloaded this book as I enjoyed the tv series years ago. I was not disapointed. The story was enguaging (although not thrilling) as one would expect. I was born in Derby, and wasn't over convinced by the Leicester accent, which sounded more Salford at times. It was however well, and etertainingly read. If you want some light entertainment this fits the bill.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

Dead Simple cover art
  • Dead Simple

  • DS Roy Grace Mystery, Book 1
  • By: Peter James
  • Narrated by: Tim Bruce
  • Length: 11 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 771
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 500
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 501

Dead simple. It was a harmless stag-night prank. But a few hours later, the groom is left buried in a coffin and the four friends who know where he is are dead.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliant!

  • By Keziah on 17-07-08

brilliant

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 27-11-08

I use my Audible on my morning commute. This was so good I couldn't wait that long and had to listen on the way home as well! Read with passion it was brilliant from start to finish.

11 of 11 people found this review helpful

  • Tales of the City

  • By: Armistead Maupin
  • Narrated by: Armistead Maupin
  • Length: 18 hrs and 19 mins
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 92
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 32
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 33

Armistead Maupin's Tales of the City has blazed a singular trail through popular culture, from a groundbreaking newspaper serial to a classic novel, to a television event that entranced millions around the world. The first of six novels about the denizens of the mythic apartment house at 28 Barbary Lane, Tales is both a wry comedy of manners and a deeply involving portrait of a vanished era.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Barbary

  • By Rhiannon on 15-02-07

two dimensional charachters and poor reading

Overall
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 17-11-08

I thought this title was an interesting proposition, but unfortunately after giving a fair trial, I gave up. The characters lacked depth and as far as I was concerned were just names. The story chopped and changed between characters without warning. The plot was highly contrived and highly improbable. It read like a cheap daytime soap opera.

2 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • A History of Modern Britain

  • By: Andrew Marr
  • Narrated by: Andrew Marr
  • Length: 7 hrs and 10 mins
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 379
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 197
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 199

Shortlisted for the Audiobook Download of the Year, 2007.
A History of Modern Britain confronts head-on the victory of shopping over politics. It tells the story of how the great political visions of New Jerusalem or a second Elizabethan Age - rival idealisms - came to be defeated by a culture of consumerism, celebrity, and self-gratification. In each decade, political leaders have thought they knew what they were doing, but found themselves confounded. Every time, the British people turn out to be stroppier and harder to herd than predicted.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A History of Modern British Politicians...

  • By Francis on 20-07-07

how we got here!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-09-08

Far from being a dry chronological history, the book is delivered in Andrews normal lively and enthusiastic style. I now undrstand the complexaties which make today, today. It also shakes your belief in those you think know better. On the whole a wonderfully entertaining and skillfully told history. If you like Andrew, you'll love this.

Harlequin cover art
  • Harlequin

  • By: Bernard Cornwell
  • Narrated by: Sean Barrett
  • Length: 12 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 87
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 19
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 19

Harlequin is what the French called the English archers who came across the Channel to lay waste the towns and countryside. Thomas of Hookton is one of these archers. When raiders sack his village, he escapes and becomes an archer in the army of King Edward III. The King and his son, the Black Prince, are going to France with a great force of knights and men-at-arms, led by great lords.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • An Immersive Experience

  • By Conphused on 30-12-05

addictive

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 23-08-08

My first Bernard Cornwell novel. Brilliantly read with good (not embarassing)characterisation. He gave the feeling of what it must have REALLY have been like standing in the battle line waiting for the knights to charge. Life was really brought to the characters and by the end I was convinced to buy the next book to see what happened.

  • The Night Watch

  • By: Sarah Waters
  • Narrated by: Juanita McMahon
  • Length: 19 hrs and 25 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 541
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 200
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 204

Shortlisted for the British Book Awards, Book of the Year, 2007.
Shortlisted for Audible's Listen of the Year, 2006.
Shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize, 2006.
Shortlisted for the Orange Prize for Fiction, 2006.

Moving back through the 1940s, through air raids, blacked out streets, illicit liaisons, sexual adventure, to end with its beginning in 1941...

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Atmospheric and gripping

  • By Karen on 26-03-06

Atmospheric and thought provoking

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-02-08

The book was very enjoyable. In the style of the great kitchen sink dramas of the 1960s. The backdrop is skillfully painted, with interesting characters and a mysteries which are only gradually revealed throughout the book.The narration is excellent, and the reader gives believable depth to the characters, both male and female in a way that makes you feel you are listening to a multi actor play.
I felt that the majority of the book took place in wartime and fleshed out the horrors of living through it, which made me think of how it affected my parents, something no other book, either fiction or non-fiction has done.
I was unsure about listening to some 'gay' literature, but found it gave me an insight into another world, and gave me real empathy.
All in all, a good thought provoking listen about the everyday lives of people in the mid 20th century. Don't miss the interview with the author at the end!

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Boys of Everest

  • By: Clint Willis
  • Narrated by: James Adams
  • Length: 15 hrs and 59 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 40
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 21
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 22

This gripping story of courage, achievement, and heartbreaking loss tells of Bonington's Boys, a band of climbers who reinvented mountaineering during the three decades after Everest's first ascent. Chris Bonington's inner circle included a dozen of the most renowned climbers, who took increasingly terrible risks on now legendary expeditions to the world's most fearsome peaks, and paid an enormous price. Most of them died in the mountains, leaving behind the hardest question of all: was it worth it?

  • out of 5 stars
  • great book, shame about the reading

  • By Anonymous User on 24-12-07

so good it gives you vertigo

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 15-12-07

As a non-climber I wondered if I would enjoy this book, but I really really did. Well written, some of it in prose style, rather than just a dry factual account, it transports you to the cold, dangerous and wind bitten faces of the worlds great mountains. It makes you wonder why they do it!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Children of War

  • The Second World War Through the Eyes of a Generation
  • By: Susan Goodman
  • Narrated by: Anne Dover
  • Length: 13 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 15
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 6
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5

The novelist Susan Goodman, herself a child of the Second World War, wanted to commemorate and celebrate the experiences of a special generation before they were lost to history. When she appealed for stories, she was overwhelmed by the response. This remarkable book is the result, a rich tapestry of the dramatic, amusing, poignant and everyday during the 20th century's greatest conflict, through a child's eyes.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Social history in the raw

  • By Nigel on 02-11-07

Social history in the raw

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-11-07

Clearly read accessable and expansive in its' depth, this book is well worth listening to. It explores the social history of the 1930s and contrasts this with the experiences, tragic and funny, of children during the war. Most of the book is a reading of transcripts from the children who were there. The reader adds some variety to these by adding appropriate, (though occasionally unconvincing) regional accents. It makes you realise how lucky you've been. If you have an interest in British social history it is recommended

7 of 7 people found this review helpful