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Dee

Halifax, United Kingdom
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  • 4
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  • 10
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  • A Morbid Taste For Bones

  • By: Ellis Peters
  • Narrated by: Stephen Thorne
  • Length: 7 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 200
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 165
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 164

In 1137 the ambitious head of Shrewsbury Abbey has decided to acquire the remains of Saint Winifred for his Benedictine order. Brother Cadfael is part of the expedition sent to her final resting place in Wales, where they find the villagers passionately divided by the Benedictines' offer for the saint's relics. Canny, wise and all too worldly, Cadfael isn't surprised when this taste for bones leads to bloody murder. The leading opponent to moving the grave has been shot dead with a mysterious arrow, and some say Winifred herself dealt the blow.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Morbid Taste For Bones

  • By Dee on 14-04-13

A Morbid Taste For Bones

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 14-04-13

This is my first taste of Ellis Peters, and I have to say I'm enjoying it very much. It is an excellent story and the narrator, Stephen Thorne, gives a rich variety of voices to the characters.

The first of her Brother Cadfael murder mysteries, set in the 12th Century, is based on a true story of the removal of a saint’s relics from a Welsh village to the Benedictine Abbey at Shrewsbury. It might not be a strictly realistic representation of the period, but that doesn’t matter in a novel of this style. It is easy and enjoyable to listen to, and I would recommend it without hesitation.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • North and South

  • By: Elizabeth Gaskell
  • Narrated by: Juliet Stevenson
  • Length: 18 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,152
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 972
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 971

Written at the request of Charles Dickens, North and South is a book about rebellion that poses fundamental questions about the nature of social authority and obedience. Gaskell expertly blends individual feeling with social concern and her heroine, Margaret Hale, is one of the most original creations of Victorian literature. When Margaret Hale's father leaves the Church in a crisis of conscience she is forced to leave her comfortable home in the tranquil countryside of Hampshire....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • an interesting novel made special by the reading

  • By Margaret on 27-12-10

Superb Classic

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 23-12-12

Against the background of 19th century social divisions, Elizabeth Gaskell adds the extra twist of the great industrial North – rural South divide. It’s a tale of morals, a clergyman giving up his position when he begins to question his faith, and a wealthy industrialist who loses everything when he refuses to take a risky investment gamble. And running through it all, the fragile blossoming romance between Margaret Hale and John Thornton. Superbly read by Juliet Stevenson, this gets five stars from me.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful